please somebody help me ....please

please somebody help me ....please

Post by froggie love » Mon, 18 Dec 2006 22:13:21



Hi , iam one of those attatched at the hip with their sewing machine
girls. i married a french guy and now i live here in france. my sewing
machine came with me , it is a few ( maybe 5 years old)  non-electronic
 singer scholastic machine. i need some help figuring out what i need
to convert the electricity, the mister at the singer store here in town
was saying i need to convert the cycles? do i really, he didn't
actually see  my machine ? i have seen next to nothing online except 2
people saying A) they never had a problem with using an transformer
                                  B) they always had a problem using an
transformer
please take pity on me someone and if you have any info to add to the
only 2 pieces of info i could find    please add it , thank you so much
 
 
 

please somebody help me ....please

Post by re.. » Tue, 19 Dec 2006 00:35:45




Quote:

>Newsgroups: rec.crafts.textiles.sewing
>Subject: please somebody help me ....please
>Date: 17 Dec 2006 05:13:21 -0800

>Hi , iam one of those attatched at the hip with their sewing machine
>girls. i married a french guy and now i live here in france. my sewing
>machine came with me , it is a few ( maybe 5 years old)  non-electronic
> singer scholastic machine. i need some help figuring out what i need
>to convert the electricity, the mister at the singer store here in town
>was saying i need to convert the cycles? do i really, he didn't
>actually see  my machine ? i have seen next to nothing online except 2
>people saying A) they never had a problem with using an transformer
>                                  B) they always had a problem using an
>transformer
>please take pity on me someone and if you have any info to add to the
>only 2 pieces of info i could find    please add it , thank you so much

Have you aksed about replacing the motor itself?

 
 
 

please somebody help me ....please

Post by Ron Anderso » Tue, 19 Dec 2006 01:51:07


The transformer should work fine for the short term. The cycles will make
the motor run a bit slower than in the US. Over the long term, if you will
be staying in France I would suggest a new machine made for that countries
electric.

--
Ron Anderson A1 Sewing Machine
PO Box 60, Sand Lake, NY 12153
518-469-5133
http://www.singera1sewing.com
http://www.a1sewingmachine.com

Quote:
> Hi , iam one of those attatched at the hip with their sewing machine
> girls. i married a french guy and now i live here in france. my sewing
> machine came with me , it is a few ( maybe 5 years old)  non-electronic
> singer scholastic machine. i need some help figuring out what i need
> to convert the electricity, the mister at the singer store here in town
> was saying i need to convert the cycles? do i really, he didn't
> actually see  my machine ? i have seen next to nothing online except 2
> people saying A) they never had a problem with using an transformer
>                                  B) they always had a problem using an
> transformer
> please take pity on me someone and if you have any info to add to the
> only 2 pieces of info i could find    please add it , thank you so much

 
 
 

please somebody help me ....please

Post by Sarah Dal » Tue, 19 Dec 2006 08:02:00


Quote:

> Hi , iam one of those attatched at the hip with their sewing machine
> girls. i married a french guy and now i live here in france. my sewing
> machine came with me , it is a few ( maybe 5 years old)  non-electronic
>  singer scholastic machine. i need some help figuring out what i need
> to convert the electricity, the mister at the singer store here in town

OK, I'm going to assume you started life in the USA, because if you were
anywhere else in EU before moving to France you wouldn't be having this
problem.

Electricity in America is 110V (volts), 60Hz (frequency)(cycles/second).
Electricity in France is 220V, 50Hz

So, there are two problems - the voltage and the frequency.

The major problem is the voltage - you need to get a step-down
transformer to derive the lower voltage to run your machine safely. You
will fry it if you plug it in without a transformer.

The frequency difference will cause your machine to run more slowly, and
could cause problems in terms of wear, tear, vibrations etc. etc.

When you purchase the transformer, make sure it is sufficiently rated to
give you enough power to run your machine. If your machine requires 400W
(watts), and the transformer is only rated for 300W, then you'll only be
getting 3/4 of the required power.

You may want to consider buying a sewing machine in France. There is at
least one lady who posts here who lives in France, if not two, and
she/they might be able to help.

HTH

Sarah

 
 
 

please somebody help me ....please

Post by froggie love » Thu, 21 Dec 2006 02:03:20


Thanks so much for the clear help ! I was finding contradicting info on
the net, i ended up buying an fairly inexpensive Toyota machine to be
my workhorse and later i will buy a transformer to attach to my other
machine for more detailed stuff. And yeah I started life in the US,with
its annoying SAE measurements and funky currency. Anyway, i am new to
this group and appreciate the help thanks.
Quote:


> > Hi , iam one of those attatched at the hip with their sewing machine
> > girls. i married a french guy and now i live here in france. my sewing
> > machine came with me , it is a few ( maybe 5 years old)  non-electronic
> >  singer scholastic machine. i need some help figuring out what i need
> > to convert the electricity, the mister at the singer store here in town

> OK, I'm going to assume you started life in the USA, because if you were
> anywhere else in EU before moving to France you wouldn't be having this
> problem.

> Electricity in America is 110V (volts), 60Hz (frequency)(cycles/second).
> Electricity in France is 220V, 50Hz

> So, there are two problems - the voltage and the frequency.

> The major problem is the voltage - you need to get a step-down
> transformer to derive the lower voltage to run your machine safely. You
> will fry it if you plug it in without a transformer.

> The frequency difference will cause your machine to run more slowly, and
> could cause problems in terms of wear, tear, vibrations etc. etc.

> When you purchase the transformer, make sure it is sufficiently rated to
> give you enough power to run your machine. If your machine requires 400W
> (watts), and the transformer is only rated for 300W, then you'll only be
> getting 3/4 of the required power.

> You may want to consider buying a sewing machine in France. There is at
> least one lady who posts here who lives in France, if not two, and
> she/they might be able to help.

> HTH

> Sarah

 
 
 

please somebody help me ....please

Post by Judith Umbri » Mon, 25 Dec 2006 04:45:07


Quote:

> Hi , iam one of those attatched at the hip with their sewing machine
> girls. i married a french guy and now i live here in france. my sewing
> machine came with me , it is a few ( maybe 5 years old)  non-electronic
>  singer scholastic machine. i need some help figuring out what i need
> to convert the electricity, the mister at the singer store here in town
> was saying i need to convert the cycles? do i really, he didn't
> actually see  my machine ? i have seen next to nothing online except 2
> people saying A) they never had a problem with using an transformer
>                                   B) they always had a problem using an
> transformer
> please take pity on me someone and if you have any info to add to the
> only 2 pieces of info i could find    please add it , thank you so much

Listen to him.  If you don't change the cycles, the motor will burn
out.  Many things can do with just the voltage change, but nothing with
brushes will last.
 
 
 

please somebody help me ....please

Post by Anna Sherida » Mon, 15 Jan 2007 21:34:54



 i need some help figuring out what i need

Quote:
> to convert the electricity, the mister at the singer store here in town
> was saying i need to convert the cycles?

I went through something similar when I 'imported' an American husband here
to Australia. I had an old old Singer sewing machine that I loved, but was
falling to pieces. When my hubby came over he brought with him all his
belongings, and these included his mother's old sewing machine built into a
lovely table! And it was the same model as mine, only hardly ever used. But
of course I could not use it here in Australia without a transformer. But
what I did I removed the motor from my old machine and put it into his. And
it worked! So if you are used to your machine perhaps you can buy the same
model somewhere in a junk shop - all you need is a motor, and have it
swapped.

We had some equipment running on transformers, and these transformers were
always buzzing and overheating, I was constantly worried about that.

Anna

 
 
 

please somebody help me ....please

Post by Pogoni » Tue, 16 Jan 2007 05:28:57


Quote:



>  i need some help figuring out what i need

>>to convert the electricity, the mister at the singer store here in town
>>was saying i need to convert the cycles?

> I went through something similar when I 'imported' an American husband here
> to Australia. I had an old old Singer sewing machine that I loved, but was
> falling to pieces. When my hubby came over he brought with him all his
> belongings, and these included his mother's old sewing machine built into a
> lovely table! And it was the same model as mine, only hardly ever used. But
> of course I could not use it here in Australia without a transformer. But
> what I did I removed the motor from my old machine and put it into his. And
> it worked! So if you are used to your machine perhaps you can buy the same
> model somewhere in a junk shop - all you need is a motor, and have it
> swapped.

> We had some equipment running on transformers, and these transformers were
> always buzzing and overheating, I was constantly worried about that.

> Anna

If the motor is external, such as with the Singer 128, 129, 15 (except
-91), 66, 115, 221 - you can swap out the motor.  If the motor is
internal, such as with the 15-91, 101, 201, 301, 401, etc., you can't.

As many people will tell you, when they started putting the motors
inside the machine housing, they created problems for us in later years,
since the motors stopped being available, and you can't just pop any
motor into the space.

--
Joanne

http://members.tripod.com/~bernardschopen/

 
 
 

please somebody help me ....please

Post by Kate XXXXX » Tue, 16 Jan 2007 08:08:06


Quote:




>>  i need some help figuring out what i need

>>> to convert the electricity, the mister at the singer store here in town
>>> was saying i need to convert the cycles?

>> I went through something similar when I 'imported' an American husband
>> here to Australia. I had an old old Singer sewing machine that I
>> loved, but was falling to pieces. When my hubby came over he brought
>> with him all his belongings, and these included his mother's old
>> sewing machine built into a lovely table! And it was the same model as
>> mine, only hardly ever used. But of course I could not use it here in
>> Australia without a transformer. But what I did I removed the motor
>> from my old machine and put it into his. And it worked! So if you are
>> used to your machine perhaps you can buy the same model somewhere in a
>> junk shop - all you need is a motor, and have it swapped.

>> We had some equipment running on transformers, and these transformers
>> were always buzzing and overheating, I was constantly worried about that.

>> Anna

> If the motor is external, such as with the Singer 128, 129, 15 (except
> -91), 66, 115, 221 - you can swap out the motor.  If the motor is
> internal, such as with the 15-91, 101, 201, 301, 401, etc., you can't.

> As many people will tell you, when they started putting the motors
> inside the machine housing, they created problems for us in later years,
> since the motors stopped being available, and you can't just pop any
> motor into the space.

Look carefully inside the motor housing, especially on earlier models:
you will sometimes find that they are the exact same motor as used in
the external housing but not in the pretty case!  Well, not that those
external motors were pretty, exactly...

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe *** of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!