Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

Post by sewingbythe.. » Sun, 11 Apr 2004 00:59:06



NAYY, but I know how we all like to accumulate good stash at reasonable
prices:
   I have this 'thing' about exploring new sites and fabric sources, and
recently I stumbled across this one. Shared it over at RCTQ, but I know
some of us do charity sewing/quilting also, so here it is:
http://www.textilecollection.com/
   They are having a whole-bolt sale on quilting ('name'
cottons,((MM/Debbie Mumm/Bernatex/Marcus Bros./Theresa Kogut etc.))
which, as we know, makes up into wonderful shirts. :) Minimum order, 2
bolts. (If I was ordering, I'd ask them to ship without the cardboard
bolt to reduce costs.) 12-18 yds per bolt, avg. $30.00 a bolt, works out
to about $2.00 yd on most of the sale items. Can't beat that with a big
stick. VIP/Cranston run about $3.50 a yd./ on a bolt purchase.
   NAYY, but this is just such a good deal, I had to share, as I am on
their mailing list. Usual per yd on quilting cottons is $8.00 a yd and
up---or $120.00 for 15 yards, to give you a comparison.
                    Cea <resisting>

 
 
 

Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

Post by Edgar » Mon, 12 Apr 2004 13:11:04


Go everywhere to find fabrics for your stash. Hit all the garage sales
u can find. Walk or drive down alleys, especially on trash day.
WONDERFUL fabrics can be found in trash piles, or free boxes.

Go to flea markets, church rummage sales, charity sales. Go to
goodwill and other thrift shops. Buy from e-bay.

Get used items. If they need cleaning, wash them regardless of how bad
it looks.  Check it more carefully when the fabric is clean and dry.

Old or worn vintage fabric usually has a lot of still very good strong
material to work with.

 
 
 

Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

Post by FtForge » Mon, 12 Apr 2004 22:29:46


So I was doing a more than just minimally acceptable thing when I went
to a local thrift shop, and bought a couple of very nice looking slips
for $.50 each and made them into some panties for my wife! The stuff
they offer for sale these days is all too cheaply made, crummy
quality and for the most part not made for people of "normal"
proportions. I actually saw JB take a pair out to show off to one of
her friends! (I was originally mortified, but felt pretty good after the
fact).

Mike (FtForger, the blacksmith)

Quote:

> Go everywhere to find fabrics for your stash. Hit all the garage sales
> u can find. Walk or drive down alleys, especially on trash day.
> WONDERFUL fabrics can be found in trash piles, or free boxes.

> Go to flea markets, church rummage sales, charity sales. Go to
> goodwill and other thrift shops. Buy from e-bay.

> Get used items. If they need cleaning, wash them regardless of how bad
> it looks.  Check it more carefully when the fabric is clean and dry.

> Old or worn vintage fabric usually has a lot of still very good strong
> material to work with.

 
 
 

Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

Post by Edgar » Tue, 13 Apr 2004 14:32:11


Quote:

> So I was doing a more than just minimally acceptable thing when I went
> to a local thrift shop, and bought a couple of very nice looking slips
> for $.50 each and made them into some panties for my wife!

Cool!  Very good use of reclaimed vintage fabric.
 
 
 

Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

Post by sewingbythe.. » Wed, 14 Apr 2004 00:57:41


Re: Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY  

Edgar,    
   Wonder if you meant this to be posted under apr. 10th post; 'Buttons,
Bows and Trims'?
   I am also a devotee of thrift shops, but I posted the fabric source
because most folks who sew for fund-raisers and charity like to use
fresh, new fabrics, for obvious reasons.
                       Cea <revelling in her thrift shop finds-- just
located an in-book pattern for turning the beaded knit sweater into an
evening bag.>
---

<Go everywhere to find fabrics for your stash. Hit all the garage sales
u can find. Walk or drive down alleys, especially on trash day.
WONDERFUL fabrics can be found in trash piles, or free boxes.
Go to flea markets, church rummage sales, charity sales. Go to goodwill
and other thrift shops. Buy from e-bay.
Get used items. If they need cleaning, wash them regardless of how bad
it looks. Check it more carefully when the fabric is clean and dry.
Old or worn vintage fabric usually has a lot of still very good strong
material to work with.

 
 
 

Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

Post by Edgar » Thu, 15 Apr 2004 09:52:58


Quote:

> Re: Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY  

> Edgar,    
>    Wonder if you meant this to be posted under apr. 10th post; 'Buttons,
> Bows and Trims'?
>    I am also a devotee of thrift shops, but I posted the fabric source
> because most folks who sew for fund-raisers and charity like to use
> fresh, new fabrics, for obvious reasons.

uhm...the reasons are not exactly obvious to me. :)

There is something to be said for brand new fabrics. Colors are
generally more vivid. However... modern fabrics are more often
polyester blends now. Plus they will have sizing that should be
removed prior to sewing.

So...as with vintage fabrics, one will be washing the cloth before use
anyway.

Anyway... it takes all sorts. I am also very into frugality, ecology,
and creative use of existing materials. It is MORE exciting to find a
new way to use existing items than getting brand new shiny stuff.

Quote:
>                        Cea <revelling in her thrift shop finds-- just
> located an in-book pattern for turning the beaded knit sweater into an
> evening bag.>

Great! the bag sounds really pretty. U should post a picture of the
finished item.

I like bags as well. My most recent creation was a bag for storing
wool fiber. The bag is made from two old pairs of jeans sewn together
lengthwise. Sort of like the old hippie skirts made of levi's.

 
 
 

Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

Post by sewingbythe.. » Thu, 15 Apr 2004 12:44:26


Re: Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY  


<snippity-do-dah>
<There is something to be said for brand new fabrics. Colors are
generally more vivid. However... modern fabrics are more often polyester
blends now.
---
<<   No, quilting cottons are more often than not, 100% cotton, and
lovely stuff it is, too, with a nice hand. I'm fond or it for making
shirts.  You're right about the colors--wonderful, bright colors/prints.
---
< Plus they will have sizing that should be removed prior to sewing.
So...as with vintage fabrics, one will be washing the cloth before use
anyway.
---
<<   Better tell that to the folks over ar RCTQ. They love those long,
arcane discussions over 'To wash, or not to wash: whether 'tis nobler to
use straight from the bolt...' <L--hey, it's late, and I'm giddy>
---
<Anyway... it takes all sorts. I am also very into frugality, ecology,
and creative use of existing materials. It is MORE exciting to find a
new way to use existing items than getting brand new shiny stuff.
---
<<  Well, yeah!! That extends, for many of us here, to machine buying,
also, but, Hey! new fabric is all good, too.
   Hmm...sorry, I wasn't real clear--when I said 'obvious', referring to
the use of new fabric, I was thinking about fabric for charity/gift
quilts; most makers favor using new cloth for donating and gifting,
whereas they might make a family quilt from saved scraps of fav dresses.
I mentioned in another post that when my dad died, DM gave me his
flannel shirts, which I plan to incorporate into quilts for each of my
sisters.   ??
---
<I like bags as well. My most recent creation was a bag for storing wool
fiber. The bag is made from two old pairs of jeans sewn together
lengthwise. Sort of like the old hippie skirts made of levi's.  
---
<<What kind of wool fiber are you stashing in your bags? The vision of
wads of freshly sheared wool is in my mind, having just read an article
about a fellow who shears sheep on the Eastern Shore. Are you storing
yarn? Strips/squares of wool fabric? Projects in mind?
   Are you Edgar, or Edgarina? <G>
                        Cea

 
 
 

Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

Post by Cynthia Spilste » Mon, 26 Apr 2004 16:29:24


Actually, for fund-raisers, charity or even sewing for 'sale' (as in the
costuming that I do) the most important thing to me is the right colour,
fabric and feel rather than where the stuff came from!
Last year my eldest daughter danced as a reindeer - and the costume was made
from old blankets bought at the thrift store!  The only rule of thumb that I
use is that the item is always cleaned before I snip and sew it - and that
is mainly to protect my machines from dirt, etc.!
Cynthia



Quote:
> > Re: Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

> > Edgar,
> >    Wonder if you meant this to be posted under apr. 10th post; 'Buttons,
> > Bows and Trims'?
> >    I am also a devotee of thrift shops, but I posted the fabric source
> > because most folks who sew for fund-raisers and charity like to use
> > fresh, new fabrics, for obvious reasons.

> uhm...the reasons are not exactly obvious to me. :)

> There is something to be said for brand new fabrics. Colors are
> generally more vivid. However... modern fabrics are more often
> polyester blends now. Plus they will have sizing that should be
> removed prior to sewing.

> So...as with vintage fabrics, one will be washing the cloth before use
> anyway.

> Anyway... it takes all sorts. I am also very into frugality, ecology,
> and creative use of existing materials. It is MORE exciting to find a
> new way to use existing items than getting brand new shiny stuff.

> >                        Cea <revelling in her thrift shop finds-- just
> > located an in-book pattern for turning the beaded knit sweater into an
> > evening bag.>

> Great! the bag sounds really pretty. U should post a picture of the
> finished item.

> I like bags as well. My most recent creation was a bag for storing
> wool fiber. The bag is made from two old pairs of jeans sewn together
> lengthwise. Sort of like the old hippie skirts made of levi's.

 
 
 

Sharing Sources/Good Deals/NAYY

Post by Edgar » Mon, 03 May 2004 13:05:28


Quote:

> What kind of wool fiber are you stashing in your bags? The vision of
> wads of freshly sheared wool is in my mind, having just read an article
> about a fellow who shears sheep on the Eastern Shore. Are you storing
> yarn? Strips/squares of wool fabric.

Right now, it's mohair fiber from our goats. We also have shetland sheep.