Making my own silk boxers

Making my own silk boxers

Post by limey.. » Mon, 21 Feb 2005 05:41:28



I'm interested in trying to make myself some SILK boxers.

The searches I have tried on this topic haven't told me if I need
'special' needles (my machine is an older STYLIST model 416), if
'polyester' thread will work and whether I need to use a specific type
of stitch.

My only real sewing project, so far, has been to make a couple of work
aprons from 'blue jean' material but my girlfriend is going to help me
get started, when I have some information to work from.

_SO_, if you could tell me about needles, thread, or whether silk is
just plain 'silk', or are there different types of silk material, I
would really appreciate it.

Thanks.

Lewis.

*****************

 
 
 

Making my own silk boxers

Post by Cynthia Spilste » Mon, 21 Feb 2005 06:28:54


Hi Lewis:
There are varying types and grades of silk, but I imagine that you are
wanting to use the soft 'drapey' kind of finished silk (as opposed to raw
silk which makes lovely blouses or the heavy Chinese silk used for jackets
and dresses).
Use either polyester thread or silk thread - your choice.  A fine needle (I
would use a size 70 sharp or universal) and because silk frays so much
finish each seam as you go!  You might want to do a bit of practise and use
French seams for the garment.
Good luck - I'm sure they'll turn out great!
Cynthia

Quote:
> I'm interested in trying to make myself some SILK boxers.

> The searches I have tried on this topic haven't told me if I need
> 'special' needles (my machine is an older STYLIST model 416), if
> 'polyester' thread will work and whether I need to use a specific type
> of stitch.

> My only real sewing project, so far, has been to make a couple of work
> aprons from 'blue jean' material but my girlfriend is going to help me
> get started, when I have some information to work from.

> _SO_, if you could tell me about needles, thread, or whether silk is
> just plain 'silk', or are there different types of silk material, I
> would really appreciate it.

> Thanks.

> Lewis.

> *****************


 
 
 

Making my own silk boxers

Post by Fran?oi » Mon, 21 Feb 2005 13:25:06


Quote:

> Hi Lewis:
> There are varying types and grades of silk, but I imagine that you
are
> wanting to use the soft 'drapey' kind of finished silk (as opposed to
raw
> silk which makes lovely blouses or the heavy Chinese silk used for
jackets
> and dresses).
> Use either polyester thread or silk thread - your choice.  A fine
needle (I
> would use a size 70 sharp or universal) and because silk frays so
much
> finish each seam as you go!  You might want to do a bit of practise
and use
> French seams for the garment.
> Good luck - I'm sure they'll turn out great!
> Cynthia


> > I'm interested in trying to make myself some SILK boxers.

> > The searches I have tried on this topic haven't told me if I need
> > 'special' needles (my machine is an older STYLIST model 416), if
> > 'polyester' thread will work and whether I need to use a specific
type
> > of stitch.

> > My only real sewing project, so far, has been to make a couple of
work
> > aprons from 'blue jean' material but my girlfriend is going to help
me
> > get started, when I have some information to work from.

> > _SO_, if you could tell me about needles, thread, or whether silk
is
> > just plain 'silk', or are there different types of silk material, I
> > would really appreciate it.

> > Thanks.

> > Lewis.

> > *****************

 
 
 

Making my own silk boxers

Post by Sally Holme » Mon, 21 Feb 2005 19:53:09


Quote:

> I'm interested in trying to make myself some SILK boxers.
[...]
> _SO_, if you could tell me about needles, thread, or whether silk is
> just plain 'silk', or are there different types of silk material, I
> would really appreciate it.

There are many, many types of silk material, from whispy fine gauze to
tweeds. It can be knitted, too, to make a stretchy fabric like T-shirting
that's great for thermal undies among other things. If you want to handle
various types you can go to
http://www.whaleys-bradford.ltd.uk/products.cfm?catID=13 and request
samples. They sell fabrics for printing and dyeing so they're plain cream or
white.

You probably want something like a medium silk twill, satin, crepe or a
heavy habotai. They're woven, so you should use a sharp or Universal needle,
size 80. A sharp needle is meant for sewing woven fabrics and it has a sharp
point to pierce the fabric. A stretch needle is for sewing stretch fabrics
(duh) and it has a rounded tip so that it pushes the threads aside rather
than breaking them and causing runs. A universal needle is a compromise and
is fine for most things.

Opinions differ over which thread you should use. Some say that you should
use silk thread on silk, and some say that silk thread is too strong and if
the seam is put under stress the fabric will tear before the thread does.

Whichever you use, make sure it's good quality. I use Gutterman thread and
Schmetz Universal needles for just about everything except jeans hems. For
those I use a jeans needle, which is a fairly strong sharp.

HTH

--
Sally Holmes
Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England

 
 
 

Making my own silk boxers

Post by limey.. » Tue, 22 Feb 2005 20:46:03


Thanks to all of you for the helpful replies, I appreciate it.

Lewis.

***************

 
 
 

Making my own silk boxers

Post by joy beeso » Wed, 23 Feb 2005 02:51:55


Commenting on other comments:

In underwear, I find flat-felled seams more comfortable than
french seams.  

In the U.S., Dharma < http://www.dharmatrading.com/ > fills
the same function as the british company mentioned
downthread.  (And even if you don't want to buy from them,
the web site is informative enough to reward a visit.)

Crepe-back satin (with the crepe side outside) would be
lovely for your *second* pair of boxers.   For the first,
something like Dharma's silk twill would be easier to
handle.  I wouldn't start with a sheer silk, either.
Phoenix Textiles < fabric.com > sometimes has a great
bargain on silk prints, if you aren't too fussy about the
print, and happen to want to buy just after some factory or
distributor got rid of leftovers.  

I find fabric much easier to handle when heavily starched,
but I've never tried it on silk -- has anybody here starched
silk?  I starch cotton knits without distorting them by
laying them out flat and square -- in knits, this requires
folding the fabric in half and basting all around to keep
the edges from curling -- then spraying thoroughly with
diluted starch in a plant mister.  When it's dry enough to
handle without risk of distortion, I flip it over and wet
the other side.

Joy Beeson
--
http://home.earthlink.net/~joybeeson/ -- needlework
http://home.earthlink.net/~dbeeson594/ROUGHSEW/ROUGH.HTM
http://home.earthlink.net/~beeson_n3f/ -- Writers' Exchange
joy beeson at earthlink dot net

 
 
 

Making my own silk boxers

Post by Karen Maslowsk » Wed, 23 Feb 2005 03:05:48


Joy, I once made something of silk charmeuse, and as an experiment I
used some kind of liquid stiffener meant for stiffening embroidery
fields to make it handle better. That worked, but it was the devil's own
job trying to get the stiffener out afterwards, and I never liked the
results after washing the garment. Spray starch wouldn't really be
enough, and the heavy, liquid starch would just be a pain, IMO.

Karen Maslowski in Ohio

Quote:

> I find fabric much easier to handle when heavily starched,
> but I've never tried it on silk -- has anybody here starched
> silk?  

 
 
 

Making my own silk boxers

Post by Kay Lancaste » Wed, 23 Feb 2005 12:42:06


Quote:
> I find fabric much easier to handle when heavily starched,
> but I've never tried it on silk -- has anybody here starched
> silk?  I starch cotton knits without distorting them by

Avoid the hassle of starching. Cut your fabric on paper -- much much easier,
faster, and more accurate.

Kay

 
 
 

Making my own silk boxers

Post by Circ » Wed, 23 Feb 2005 19:10:13


Thank you, Sally , for the most sensible, memorable explaination of
needle types. I shall never forget it as you put it so well. :-)
 
 
 

Making my own silk boxers

Post by Circ » Wed, 23 Feb 2005 19:10:07


Thank you, Sally , for the most sensible, memorable explaination of
needle types. I shall never forget it as you put it so well. :-)