Newbie needs tatting advise

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Anna Carlss » Fri, 28 Mar 1997 04:00:00



I know there are some keen tatters on the group, so I hope someone will be
able to help me.

Yesterday, I decided to teach myself tatting. I borrow the only book about
tatting in the library and bought two shuttles. The book has many patterns but
the instructions are very short and a little vague. So far, I've done about
10cm of a simple edging, and it's FUN! I'm quite satisfied with the result,
but I do have a few questions that book doesn't answer.

The books says to use DMC Cordonnet nr 30, but I didn't have that at home, so
I used nr 60 instead. What type of thread to you use? Can I use fine linen
thread or even thinner DMC thread like nr 100. I would like to have the final
work as "lacey" as possible.

How hard should I pull the knots? I try to keep a similar tension to the one I
have when I'm crocheting with the same thread. Should I pull harder?

The book shows how to hold the work between the thumb and the index finger of
the left hand, and adjust the loop with the middle and ring finger. For some
reason, it much easier for me to hold the work with my thumb and middle finger
and adjust the loop with my index and ring finger. Is there any good reason
why I shouldn't do like this?

I'm grateful for any tips or tricks. It seems to great fun, and I like the
look of it.

Anna, in Lund, Sweden, where a bout of rain and strong winds arrived just in
time for the Easter break. I'd better stay inside and tat.
--
Anna Carlsson
National Centre for High Resolution Electron Microscopy
Centre of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University
Lund, Sweden http://www.oorg2.lth.se

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by AJ Bennet » Fri, 28 Mar 1997 04:00:00


I teach tatting and am always pleased to see another convert.  I hate to
see any needlework die out and want to see this one kept alive.

You can used whatever thread you choose.  However, I find threads that
are rather loosely twisted like Pearl Cotton can be a pain.  I have used
everything from Knit-Cro-Sheen to sewing thread for some of my projects.

As long as you can close your rings and tighten your chains (not much
but enough to make sure they are curved in a nice arc), you should be
fine.  The one thing, unless specified, that you want to do is to keep
your picots as close to the same size as possible.  Mine are usually a
little different but quite close.

A lady in my class brought in a piece that her mother had started.  Her
picots were identical.  Made me so jealous.

I, too, hold my thread between my thumb and middle finger.  One of the
things I tell my students is to find a way that is comfortable for you.
Experiment and try different ways and go back to the one that feels most
comfortable.

Good luck on your endeavors.  If you have anymore questions, please feel
free to email me.  Ann

Quote:

> I know there are some keen tatters on the group, so I hope someone will be
> able to help me.

> Yesterday, I decided to teach myself tatting. I borrow the only book about
> tatting in the library and bought two shuttles. The book has many patterns but
> the instructions are very short and a little vague. So far, I've done about
> 10cm of a simple edging, and it's FUN! I'm quite satisfied with the result,
> but I do have a few questions that book doesn't answer.

> The books says to use DMC Cordonnet nr 30, but I didn't have that at home, so
> I used nr 60 instead. What type of thread to you use? Can I use fine linen
> thread or even thinner DMC thread like nr 100. I would like to have the final
> work as "lacey" as possible.

> How hard should I pull the knots? I try to keep a similar tension to the one I
> have when I'm crocheting with the same thread. Should I pull harder?

> The book shows how to hold the work between the thumb and the index finger of
> the left hand, and adjust the loop with the middle and ring finger. For some
> reason, it much easier for me to hold the work with my thumb and middle finger
> and adjust the loop with my index and ring finger. Is there any good reason
> why I shouldn't do like this?

> I'm grateful for any tips or tricks. It seems to great fun, and I like the
> look of it.

> Anna, in Lund, Sweden, where a bout of rain and strong winds arrived just in
> time for the Easter break. I'd better stay inside and tat.
> --
> Anna Carlsson
> National Centre for High Resolution Electron Microscopy
> Centre of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University
> Lund, Sweden http://www.oorg2.lth.se


 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by jcjc » Sat, 29 Mar 1997 04:00:00


My mother is 94 and has been tatting since she was a ***ager. BTW,
she still crochets, tats, knits and works in my craft shop 6 days a
week.  

Here are her suggestions:

: The books says to use DMC Cordonnet nr 30, but I didn't have that
at home, so
: I used nr 60 instead. What type of thread to you use? Can I use
fine linen
: thread or even thinner DMC thread like nr 100. I would like to have
the final
: work as "lacey" as possible.

If you can work with thread as small as size 100 then, by all means,
do so.  Size 70 is considered regular tatting size.  Of course, the
smaller the thread the lacier the look.  Experiment with samples and
keep a journal of swatches.

:
: How hard should I pull the knots? I try to keep a similar tension
to the one I
: have when I'm crocheting with the same thread. Should I pull
harder?

If you can't get the knot to slip and pull into a ring then your
tension is too tight.  As long as you can keep the thread moving then
it is ok.

: The book shows how to hold the work between the thumb and the index
finger of
: the left hand, and adjust the loop with the middle and ring finger.
For some
: reason, it much easier for me to hold the work with my thumb and
middle finger
: and adjust the loop with my index and ring finger. Is there any
good reason
: why I shouldn't do like this?

If this is the handiest way for you then it is ok.  Whatever is
easiest as long as the results are the same.  Everyone has to develop
their own method variation and what is awkward for me might be
perfect for you.

:
: I'm grateful for any tips or tricks. It seems to great fun, and I
like the
: look of it.

I am happy to know that young women are carrying on the old crafts.
Many traditional crafts are being lost and the few who still preserve
them and admire them are precious indeed.  If you need clarification
or have any more questions, just email me at my daughter's email
address.

Good luck.

Imo (from the greening fields of North Central Missouri, USA)

Well Anna, I hope mother was of some help.  I wish you could sit with
her and tat, she is a feisty lady, you would enjoy her.  Let us know
if we can be of help.        Janice
:

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Carol Morg » Sun, 30 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Way to go Imo!!!! I also am blessed with a very active grandmother who
is nearing 90 and although she is not as active as she was a few years
ago, she is still more than holding her own. She's a quilter - maybe
the needlework gene is connected to the feisty gene! I hope so!

Carol


Quote:

>My mother is 94 and has been tatting since she was a ***ager. BTW,
>she still crochets, tats, knits and works in my craft shop 6 days a
>week.  

>Here are her suggestions:

(edited)
Quote:
>I am happy to know that young women are carrying on the old crafts.
>Many traditional crafts are being lost and the few who still preserve
>them and admire them are precious indeed.  If you need clarification
>or have any more questions, just email me at my daughter's email
>address.

>Good luck.

>Imo (from the greening fields of North Central Missouri, USA)

>Well Anna, I hope mother was of some help.  I wish you could sit with
>her and tat, she is a feisty lady, you would enjoy her.  Let us know
>if we can be of help.        Janice
>:

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Anna Carlss » Wed, 02 Apr 1997 04:00:00


I would like to thank all those of you who helped me with my tatting
questions. During the weekend I've done some more edgings and a small doily,
and it's going better and better. I think I'm hooked. The most difficult
question now, is how to convince my cat that those tempting, dangling shuttles
are my toys, not hers. :-)

Anna, in Lund, Sweden
--
Anna Carlsson
National Centre for High Resolution Electron Microscopy
Centre of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University
Lund, Sweden http://www.oorg2.lth.se

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Kelli » Wed, 02 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I would like to thank all those of you who helped me with my tatting
> questions. During the weekend I've done some more edgings and a small doily,
> and it's going better and better. I think I'm hooked. The most difficult
> question now, is how to convince my cat that those tempting, dangling shuttles
> are my toys, not hers. :-)

> Anna, in Lund, Sweden
> --
> Anna Carlsson
> National Centre for High Resolution Electron Microscopy
> Centre of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University
> Lund, Sweden http://www.oorg2.lth.se

Anna,
     I am also interested in tatting.  However, I haven't been brave
enough to try yet.  What kind of information did you receive that helped
you?  Also, for those that do tat--is the shuttle method or the needle
method easier to learn?  

Thanks for your help,
Kellie

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Marci » Thu, 03 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Another newbie tatter here..... I am overwhelmed by the variety of
shuttles available on the 'net! What is a good shuttle that I will like
using even after I am experienced? I would rather spend a little up
front on a great tool than struggle with a bargain (it ain't no
bargain!)...but not $100 ;)

Marcie

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Lesa & Mark Steel » Fri, 04 Apr 1997 04:00:00


I also have had a shuttle (rather than a needle) in my hand for the
past two weeks.  I learned how to needle tat about two years ago.
Shuttle tatting has always alluded me however.  I *finally* (after
several hours!) understand transferring the stitch.  WoW did *that* take
practice.  Im trying to figure out two shuttles now---with little luck.

Quote:
> A lady in my class brought in a piece that her mother had started.  Her > picots were identical.  Made me so jealous.

I thought about (or maybe read somewhere in the past) about using
stilleto's to keep the picots even when learning--does this work?

Quote:

> I, too, hold my thread between my thumb and middle finger.  One of the
> things I tell my students is to find a way that is comfortable for you.

Hahahahahah--I still havent found what is comfortable to me.  Some areas
go easily--others are frustrating.  I still can't figure out the correct
tension for my ball thread .  Oh well, I guess it will come in time.
But in the interim , I too, find that holding the thread /B/ my thumb
and middle is proves the best for me.

I love the look of tatting. Lately I have acquired two pieces (a dresser
scarf and a 30" doily).  These give me my inspiration to continue.  What
lovely work went into these!  Reminds me of how I loved the smell of
linen when I first started stitching on linen :->

Lesa

---------------------------
Lesa & Mark Steele
http://nj5.injersey.com/~cs

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Val Gro » Fri, 04 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>Another newbie tatter here..... I am overwhelmed by the variety of
>shuttles available on the 'net! What is a good shuttle that I will like
>using even after I am experienced? I would rather spend a little up
>front on a great tool than struggle with a bargain (it ain't no
>bargain!)...but not $100 ;)

I'm itching to give this a go myself, can anyone direct me in the
right direction as regards to web pages on this craft.

Val
Cambridge, England

Quote:
>Marcie

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Carrie & John Carlso » Sat, 05 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Hi, Marcie.  I put some pictures of my shuttles on my web site at
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~carlson/index.html
I'm not selling, only telling.  The three pictured are my favorites.
I have had one of the three since I was in my early '***s -Shudder
that was over 20 years ago!  I don't recomend any particular brand.  
You have to try one for a while (not at $100 though)  what is comfortable
for me to use may be agony for you to use.
-Carrie


Quote:
>snip<

|What is a good shuttle that I will like
| using even after I am experienced? I would rather spend a little up
| front on a great tool than struggle with a bargain (it ain't no
| bargain!)...but not $100 ;)
 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Stephanie Pete » Sat, 05 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>Another newbie tatter here..... I am overwhelmed by the variety of
>shuttles available on the 'net! What is a good shuttle that I will like
>using even after I am experienced? I would rather spend a little up
>front on a great tool than struggle with a bargain (it ain't no
>bargain!)...but not $100 ;)

Unless you intend to buy antiques, or sterling silver, shuttles don't
get that expensive.  Shuttles are one of those personal taste things,
the tatting looks the same whichever you used, so it's a matter of
finding one that feels good to you.  Some have a hook attached so you
don't have to put it down to get a crochet hook for joins, some have a
pick for the same purpose.  Most you fill with thread by clicking it
through the points, but a few have a removable bobbin which is easier to
fill, and when you are working provides fine control over the length of
working thread.  

My suggestion is buy four, use each one, then you will find if you are a
with or without hook person, with or without bobbin, and small or larger
suit your hands.  Try these:
1) Aero grey plastic- has hook and bobbin.  You may see a red plastic
version, these aren't as good.
2) The smallest you can find without hook or pick - possibly Susan
Bates.  If so check the metal carefully before use and sand down any
rough edges or you will have a Norman Bates!
3) A huge plastic one called a Tatsy.  Every tatter needs one of these
for working with thick threads or on pieces which take a lot of thread
to avoid joins.
4) Something with a pick.
There is also an older design called Lady Hoare where the thread goes
round the centre of a flat piece with some prongs on.  These are tricky
to hold without touching the thread, also not widely available.

Good luck

Steph Peters, Manchester, England

Tatting, lace & stitching page http://www.cityscape.co.uk/users/bj64/

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Stephanie Pete » Sat, 05 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>I'm itching to give this a go myself, can anyone direct me in the
>right direction as regards to web pages on this craft.

A good starting point is Tattered at
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/5082/
Or  
http://192.216.191.90/Heartland/5082/

This has lots of links to other places and some good pictures.  There is
tatting to look at on my page and some patterns, but they are definitely
not intended for beginners.  See signature for URL.

Steph Peters, Manchester, England

Tatting, lace & stitching page http://www.cityscape.co.uk/users/bj64/

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Beth Gra » Sat, 05 Apr 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

> Hi, Marcie.  I put some pictures of my shuttles on my web site at
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/~carlson/index.html
> I'm not selling, only telling.  The three pictured are my favorites.
> I have had one of the three since I was in my early '***s -Shudder
> that was over 20 years ago!  I don't recomend any particular brand.
> You have to try one for a while (not at $100 though)  what is comfortable
> for me to use may be agony for you to use.
> -Carrie


> >snip<
> |What is a good shuttle that I will like
> | using even after I am experienced? I would rather spend a little up
> | front on a great tool than struggle with a bargain (it ain't no
> | bargain!)...but not $100 ;)

Carrie,

Your white one looks kind of like an old one I inherited from my maiden
great-grandaunt.  It is so smooth and is the one I liked to work with
the most.  Now if only I could get my hands fixed so I could use it
again.

Beth G

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Carrie & John Carlso » Sun, 06 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Hi, Marcie.  I put some pictures of my shuttles on my web site at
http://www.FoundCollection.com/~carlson/index.html
I'm not selling, only telling.  The three pictured are my favorites.
I have had one of the three since I was in my early '***s -Shudder
that was over 20 years ago!  I don't recomend any particular brand.  
You have to try one for a while (not at $100 though)  what is comfortable
for me to use may be agony for you to use.
-Carrie


Quote:
>snip<

|What is a good shuttle that I will like
| using even after I am experienced? I would rather spend a little up
| front on a great tool than struggle with a bargain (it ain't no
| bargain!)...but not $100 ;)

--

(anti-spam reply address just take out the extra s)
The library at Alexanderia should have had a mirror site.

 
 
 

Newbie needs tatting advise

Post by Martha Beth Lew » Wed, 09 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Haha!  My advice is one word:  chocolate.
Martha Beth