Finishing JCS Ornaments

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Nicol » Thu, 16 Sep 1999 04:00:00



Well, I got my JCS Ornaments issue yesterday and fell in love with all
of them!!  I'm wondering though how hard it would be for ME to finish
these off.  In the past whenever I've had an ornament to be finished, I
always paid someone to do it.  But how hard can it be?  Keep in mind
though that I XS and I can sew on a button BUT THAT'S IT.  I can't hem a
pair of pants and I don't "sew".  I do, however, want to attempt this.
I don't own a sewing maching either.  Wouldn't know what to do with
one.  Does anyone know of a website with pictures that explains how to
finish off ornaments/pillows such as these?  The instructions in the JCS
magazine are good, but a picture is worth a thousand words.  Some of the
terms I don't understand either such as seam allowance and a
blindstitch.  I have no idea what padded mounting board is nor a fabric
marking pencil.  Are these items I can get at Wal-Mart?  Do I have to
put some kind of backing onto my fabric before I stuff it and turn it
into an ornament/pillow?  I didn't know if the stuffing would come out
the holes.  

One more question, the hardanger ornament by Nordic Needle states you
should use a sewing maching to "stitch in the ditch" of the
buttonhole-stitch edge.  What does this mean and is it really
necessary?  I thought a buttonhole stitch secured the edges by itself?

Can you tell I'm overwhelmed and/or over my head?  Any advice or URL's
greatly appreciated.  TIA

Nicole

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Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Jill Spreenberg-Robins » Thu, 16 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> Well, I got my JCS Ornaments issue yesterday and fell in love with all
> of them!!  I'm wondering though how hard it would be for ME to finish
> these off.  In the past whenever I've had an ornament to be finished, I
> always paid someone to do it.  But how hard can it be?<...>

I haven't seen the magazine yet, but you might be able to find some
very basic sewing instructions  at the Mining Co. website:

<http://sewing.about.com/msub20.htm?pid=2731&cob=home>

I imagine you could finish them without a sewing machine.  Just turn
the edges under (this is also known as "seam allowance" - the extra
fabric allowed to make a seam) and whipstitch (sewing thru the folded
layers of fabric from top to bottom, top to bottom - harder to describe
than do) or glue a backing material onto the ornament.  Glue on
cording, braid or some other decorative trim to cover the edge.

Quote:
> I have no idea what padded mounting board is nor a fabric
> marking pencil.  Are these items I can get at Wal-Mart?

You can make padded mounting board by simply cutting a piece of fleece
(thinner) or quilt batting (thicker) and cardboard to the shape of the
ornament.  The fleece/batting is available at Wal Mart or any sewing
store (JoAnns, etc.).  Fabric marking pencils should be available there
too, but any #2 pencil will work - to make little marks.  USE LIGHTLY
tho - and sometimes the marks can be erased or washed out.

  Do I have to

Quote:
> put some kind of backing onto my fabric before I stuff it and turn it
> into an ornament/pillow?  I didn't know if the stuffing would come out
> the holes.

No, you can make a pillow shape and stuff it with polyester fiberfill
(also available at Wal Mart, Hobby Lobby, JoAnns etc) - the stuffing
will not come out of the holes.  

Quote:

> One more question, the hardanger ornament by Nordic Needle states you
> should use a sewing maching to "stitch in the ditch" of the
> buttonhole-stitch edge.  What does this mean and is it really
> necessary?  I thought a buttonhole stitch secured the edges by itself?

I've never done this and my ornaments hold together with buttonhole
just fine.  The 'ditch' is the area just behind the outside edge of the
buttonhole stitch - where it makes a ridge.  This would be equivalent
to one ground fabric thread in from the edge.  I've read that stitching
'in the ditch' will keep the ground fabric from unraveling, but I've
not had any problems with that so far...

Gosh, so many questions!  I hope I've not confused you further - I'm
sure you'll get lots of help here!

Jill in IL
----------------


 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by John & Liz Hampto » Thu, 16 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> snip Keep in mind
> though that I XS and I can sew on a button BUT THAT'S IT.  I can't hem a
> pair of pants and I don't "sew".  snipNicole

Anyone can hem a pair of pants!!!  All you need is masking tape or a
stapler. :-))))))
--
Liz from Humbug
Remove knots to reply
 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Nicol » Thu, 16 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
> Anyone can hem a pair of pants!!!  All you need is masking tape or a
> stapler. :-))))))

Welllll, when you put it like that, I guess I can.  I just like my XS to
look better than my pants.  
LOL

Nicole

===> remove "devnull" from my address to reply <===

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Barbara Foste » Thu, 16 Sep 1999 04:01:00


Quote:

> One more question, the hardanger ornament by Nordic Needle states you
> should use a sewing maching to "stitch in the ditch" of the
> buttonhole-stitch edge.  What does this mean and is it really
> necessary?  I thought a buttonhole stitch secured the edges by itself?

If anyone has advice on this, I'm currently stitching the Nordic Needle
ornament and would love to know the answer. :) I have similar "sewing"
experience to Nicole, which is to say, not much. :)

barbara :)

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by CPBrown » Fri, 17 Sep 1999 04:00:00



writes:

Quote:
>One more question, the hardanger ornament by Nordic Needle states you
>should use a sewing maching to "stitch in the ditch" of the
>buttonhole-stitch edge.  What does this mean and is it really
>necessary?  I thought a buttonhole stitch secured the edges by itself?

I have never done this, and have never had any problem either. I think that
unless your hardanger ornament is going to be handled alot or get alot of wear
and tear, it really wouldn't be necessary. I also wonder how this would look? I
wouldn't want to do it if the machine stitching would show.

Cindy Brown

    ____________________________________________________
   l___(_o_)_______l_l___O_o_O_O_)_o_o_O_O_O_l_9_O_O_O_l

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by JPag » Fri, 17 Sep 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

>I have never done this, and have never had any problem either. I think that
>unless your hardanger ornament is going to be handled alot or get alot of
>wear
>and tear, it really wouldn't be necessary. I also wonder how this would look?
>I
>wouldn't want to do it if the machine stitching would show.

I don't think I can really describe it, but to "stitch in the ditch" means to
stitch in the seam itself.  When done properly, it shouldn't show at all.
Having never done hardanger, I can't say if it would be necessary, but years of
sewing experience tell me to it may be a good technique for finishing a piece.

Jacqueline
Morgantown WV
Remove nospam
WIPs:  Christmas Eve Ornament and Golden Partridge & Pears (JCS 98); TW's
Fl***Bell Pull; An Afghan of Birds; DMC's Bluebird Peaches; Christmas
Gentlemen; Sudberry's Tea Set; Pharaoh's Pet

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Jill Spreenberg-Robins » Fri, 17 Sep 1999 04:00:00




Quote:
> This bit confused me, too. So you actually machine stitch over the top of
> the buttonhole stitches? Right next to the edge.

Yes, that's what it means.  And yes, unless the machine stitches were
really tiny, I'd think they'd show (and think they'd look odd, too).
If you're really concerned about ravelling, I suppose you could machine
stitch 2-3 stitches away from the raw edge _before_ doing the
buttonhole edge.  The buttonhole stitches would then cover the machine
stitching.

Quote:
> Sorry, I'm having a hard
> time grasping the concept. Having read a total of maybe 2 Hardanger books,
> and never having completed an actual piece yet, all I can think of is that
> Janice Love never told me to do that. Whimper. Is this a common instruction
> on Hardanger pieces?

There, there, no whimpering now <pat, pat>. :-)  No, I don't think it's
a common instruction at all.  I've never read it in either Janice
Love's or Emie Bishop's instructions.  I think Nordic Needle may be the
only ones recommending this.  FWIW, I really don't think it's necessary
unless your piece is going to get a _lot_ of handling.  Even then, I've
made 18 of Emie's heart ornaments, all finished w/buttonhole stitches,
and all ***d quite a bit, and not a one of them is showing signs of
ravelling.  

Jill in IL
----------------

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Josephine & Bruc » Sat, 18 Sep 1999 04:00:00



:

snip
: >
: > One more question, the hardanger ornament by Nordic Needle states you
: > should use a sewing maching to "stitch in the ditch" of the
: > buttonhole-stitch edge.  What does this mean and is it really
: > necessary?  I thought a buttonhole stitch secured the edges by itself?
:
: I've never done this and my ornaments hold together with buttonhole
: just fine.  The 'ditch' is the area just behind the outside edge of the
: buttonhole stitch - where it makes a ridge.  This would be equivalent
: to one ground fabric thread in from the edge.  I've read that stitching
: 'in the ditch' will keep the ground fabric from unraveling, but I've
: not had any problems with that so far...
:

This bit confused me, too. So you actually machine stitch over the top of
the buttonhole stitches? Right next to the edge. Sorry, I'm having a hard
time grasping the concept. Having read a total of maybe 2 Hardanger books,
and never having completed an actual piece yet, all I can think of is that
Janice Love never told me to do that. Whimper. Is this a common instruction
on Hardanger pieces?

Josephine
Brisbane, Australia

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Golf pa » Sun, 19 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>Well, I got my JCS Ornaments issue yesterday and fell in love with all
>of them!!  I'm wondering though how hard it would be for ME to finish
>these off.  

The part of finishing these ornaments that gets me nervous is the twisted
cording. I've never done this before. Can it be done without a drill and how
hard is it to make these cords? Are there any hints to make this easier?

Pat

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Josephine & Bruc » Sun, 19 Sep 1999 04:00:00



: > This bit confused me, too. So you actually machine stitch over the top
of
: > the buttonhole stitches? Right next to the edge.
:
: Yes, that's what it means.  And yes, unless the machine stitches were
: really tiny, I'd think they'd show (and think they'd look odd, too).
: If you're really concerned about ravelling, I suppose you could machine
: stitch 2-3 stitches away from the raw edge _before_ doing the
: buttonhole edge.  The buttonhole stitches would then cover the machine
: stitching.
:
snip

Thanks, Jill.

Feeling better now. The idea of machine stitching before the buttonhole
stitch sounds more like Janice Love's instructions. Actually, that's where I
abandoned my first Hardanger project. It was one of the projects in Basics
and Beyond and my sewing machine chose to spit the dummy just as I got to
this point. The machine's all fixed now, but somehow the Hardanger hasn't
seen the light of day since.

It isn't only the Nordic Needle ornament that has this instruction. Lesa
Steele's design has it too. I've been looking at that little bellpull
longingly, and convincing myself that it's only a matter of following
instructions. If I can finish the eleventy-six*** other items that just
have to be stitched right now, I'll be ready to start. I think I'll use
Mulberry Belfast for the bottom layer, though. Mostly because I already have
a piece, and because it's such a rich colour.

--
Josephine
Brisbane, Australia

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Pam Fur » Sun, 19 Sep 1999 04:00:00


"Spit the dummy"!!LOL What a great expression
from down under...does it have an origin that you know of? Ya learn
something every day here...I love it!

Pam in CA

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by sandro » Mon, 20 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Twisted cording is fun to make and really easy once you've done one or two.
 If you have access to the mini-drill that is sold in most LNS's, it will
be one of the best tools you've ever bought.  I noticed at HOCS this year
that the price had come down somewhat on them -- I saw them at one booth
for $7.95 and at another for $8.95.  

To calculate how long to cut your strands of fiber (I usually use #5 perle
coton), measure to see how long your finished cord needs to be and multiply
that number by three.  Cut the desired number of strands (e.g., four
strands will give you an 8-strand finished cord).  Tie a knot at each end
of the bundle of strands, and fasten one end to the hook on the drill (You
can also twist the cord by hand -- tie this end of the strands to a
pencil).  You can have DH or other handy person hold the other end; or you
can do like I did and***a cup hook into a block of wood which I then
set on the counter to fasten the other end onto while I'm twisting.  

Once both ends are secured, step back to take up the slack in the strands,
and start twisting.  You want to keep twisting until the cord starts to
kink up a little.  Carefully remove the cord from the drill end; and
(holding the end firmly) hook the drill (or some other weight, such as your
keys) onto the cording at the center point.  Now take the other end of the
cord and place the ends together, holding them high enough in the air so
that the weight dangles.  This will cause the cord to twist naturally into
a beautiful finished twisted cord (You can "help" it along by smoothing it
and continuing the twisting motion with your fingers).

Once you've mastered doing a one-color cord this way, you can make a
two-color cord by knotting the two colors together, then stretching them
out with one color at one end and the other color at the other end with the
joining knot in the center.  After twisting the strands, the weight will
hang where the colors are joined to make the final twist.

Sorry for the long post -- hope these directions are clear to you.



Quote:
> >Well, I got my JCS Ornaments issue yesterday and fell in love with all
> >of them!!  I'm wondering though how hard it would be for ME to finish
> >these off.  

> The part of finishing these ornaments that gets me nervous is the twisted
> cording. I've never done this before. Can it be done without a drill and
how
> hard is it to make these cords? Are there any hints to make this easier?

> Pat

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Josephine & Bruc » Tue, 21 Sep 1999 04:00:00



: "Spit the dummy"!!LOL What a great expression
: from down under...does it have an origin that you know of? Ya learn
: something every day here...I love it!
:
: Pam in CA

I can't remember when I started using this phrase. Not while I was growing
up...... I have a vague idea that I might have picked it up after reading
the Footrot Flats cartoons by Murray Ball (NZ origin), but I could be
completely wrong about that. It just seems so appropriate sometimes. :-D

--
Josephine
Brisbane, Australia

 
 
 

Finishing JCS Ornaments

Post by Aramanth Da » Wed, 22 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>"Spit the dummy"!!LOL What a great expression
>from down under...does it have an origin that you know of? Ya learn
>something every day here...I love it!
>Pam in CA

It basically means to have a tantrum.  A Dummy is that ***
fake-*** put into a baby's mouth to shut them up (ie: a pacifier).
So if you say someone spat the dummy, they are behaving just like a
thwarted 2yo!

Aramanth
--
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