I-Cord?

I-Cord?

Post by Dawn Owens-Nichols » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00



Hi All,

I have a pattern which says to cast on 3 stitches and work I-cord for
12 inches.  How do you do I-cord?

When I make cord, I use a little spool that has 4 nails in it.
I am not sure how to make cord by casting on...

I checked my Mary Thomas knitting book...but there is nothing called
I-cord there.  

Any help out there?

-Dawn

 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by JAS » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00


I had a pattern that said something similar. I got a new pattern. Not that
I'm suggesting that you give up so easily or anything, but I always figure
that if I can't understand the first instructions I come to, its not going
to get any better and half way through the pattern, I'm going to come to
something I really can't figure out and be really out a lot of time. That
was before I discovered this group, though - the people here will
undoubtedly be able to help.

J.

Quote:

> Hi All,

> I have a pattern which says to cast on 3 stitches and work I-cord for
> 12 inches.  How do you do I-cord?

> When I make cord, I use a little spool that has 4 nails in it.
> I am not sure how to make cord by casting on...

> I checked my Mary Thomas knitting book...but there is nothing called
> I-cord there.  

> Any help out there?

> -Dawn

--

            http://www.FoundCollection.com/
    Now including all the boring,***details of my life!

 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Clifford E William » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00


I think that I-cord started with Elizabeth Zimmermann (EZ) and most
knitters would just assume that you _must_ be familiar with her work.

That said, I-cord is deliberately twisted knitting.  It is easiest to do
on dp needles.  But can be done on sp.

K those three stitches and then take the dp needle in your right hand
and place it in your left *WITHOUT* turning it.  The last stitch that
you knitted is on the *LEFT* of the the needle in your left hand.  Now K
those three stitches again.  That's right start right in on the first
stitch that you knitted instead of the last.

If you are using sp needles just slip the stitches back to the left
needle instead of trading needles at all.

If that isn't clear enough maybe someone else can explain it better.

Quote:

> Hi All,

> I have a pattern which says to cast on 3 stitches and work I-cord for
> 12 inches.  How do you do I-cord?

> When I make cord, I use a little spool that has 4 nails in it.
> I am not sure how to make cord by casting on...

> I checked my Mary Thomas knitting book...but there is nothing called
> I-cord there.

> Any help out there?

> -Dawn

--
Clifford E. Williams  Southern Adventist U.  Collegedale, TN, USA

"Progress is to go forward.
 Regress is to go backward.
 Congress is to go around in circles."
                the Imperial Salamander

 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Dawn Owens-Nichols » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00


On Tue, 11 Jan 2000 16:49:51 -0500,

Quote:
> I think that I-cord started with Elizabeth Zimmermann (EZ) and most
> knitters would just assume that you _must_ be familiar with her work.

> That said, I-cord is deliberately twisted knitting.  It is easiest to do
> on dp needles.  But can be done on sp.

<instructions snipped>

Thanks for the info Clifford.  I just tried it and it is pretty easy to do.
I've been knitting for years but I've never heard of this Eliz. Zimmerman.
I must be knittingly isolated.

Thank you,
Dawn

 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Mary-Lo » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00


something similar can also be done on a knitting machine - cast on from
3 to 5 stitches,and set carriage to knit only in one direction. make
sure the knitting is well weighted, as cord of this type has a tendency
to spring off the needles, and also move the weights up periodically,
as the knitting grows.  bind off in the normal way.

what you get is a strip of knitting with curling edges and long
"floats" across the back, to get rid of the floats, just pull the
knitting vertically, which causes the floats to "disappear", or rather
to be taken up by the stitches in the strip.

on this same subject, i wonder if anyone can help with some
information?  many years ago, i think i saw a mechanical knitting nancy
in a (german?) magazine. you clamped it to a table-top, wrapped the
wool round the "pins" in the normal way, and then by turning a handle,
the device would knit cords for you (presumably quicker than the manual
version, and less fiddly).  so, does anyone recognise this description,
or know who might manufacture such a device ??

thanks

Mary-Lou

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I-Cord?

Post by Kris Benso » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
> On Tue, 11 Jan 2000 16:49:51 -0500,

> > I think that I-cord started with Elizabeth Zimmermann (EZ) and most
> > knitters would just assume that you _must_ be familiar with her work.

> > That said, I-cord is deliberately twisted knitting.  It is easiest to do
> > on dp needles.  But can be done on sp.

> <instructions snipped>

> Thanks for the info Clifford.  I just tried it and it is pretty easy to

do.

Dawn,
That's why it's called I-cord:  the "I" stands for idiot.  E.Z. felt that
I-cord was a more polite term than idiot-cord.  You *must* see if you can
locate some of her books.  They are wonderful!  Between her sense of humor,
very dry, and her down to earth, very sensible approach to knitting, you're
in for a treat.  The first book of hers that I read is titled "Knitting
Without Tears".  There are several others, as well as a video or two.  If
your local library doesn't have them, I'm sure that you can check some of
the online knitting stores for them.  Her daughter, Meg Swansen, runs the
business they started together called Schoolhouse Press; of course, they
carry them.  They're not online, as far as I know, but any recent copy of a
current knitting magazine like Vogue Knitting, Knitters, or Interweave
Press's Knits will have an ad with their address and phone number.

Happy knitting,
Nanette

Quote:
> I've been knitting for years but I've never heard of this Eliz. Zimmerman.
> I must be knittingly isolated.

> Thank you,
> Dawn

 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Helen Fleische » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00


I-cord is short for "idiot cord" a term I think Elizabeth Zimmerman
coined. Usually you use 2 double pointed needles and knit the same
direction for every row, never purling, pulling the short tail up to
round the cord. In other words, you knit across, then without turning
the work, you knit across. The tail of the yarn won't be on that first
stitch you go to knit, but that's okay, so long as you don't let it get
wrapped around. Pulling that snug is what makes it a cord instead of a
narrow ribbon.


Quote:

>Hi All,

>I have a pattern which says to cast on 3 stitches and work I-cord for
>12 inches.  How do you do I-cord?

>When I make cord, I use a little spool that has 4 nails in it.
>I am not sure how to make cord by casting on...

>I checked my Mary Thomas knitting book...but there is nothing called
>I-cord there.  

>Any help out there?

>-Dawn


 Helen "Halla" Fleischer,
 Fantasy & Fiber Artist in Fairland, MD USA
 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Steph Thornt » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00


On Wed, 12 Jan 2000 02:08:23 -0800, Mary-Lou said...

Quote:
>on this same subject, i wonder if anyone can help with some
>information?  many years ago, i think i saw a mechanical knitting
>nancyin a (german?) magazine. you clamped it to a table-top,
>wrapped thewool round the "pins" in the normal way, and then by
>turning a handle,the device would knit cords for you (presumably
>quicker than the manualversion, and less fiddly).  so, does anyone
>recognise this description,or know who might manufacture such a
>device ??

Yes, I have one, although it doesn't clamp to a table. It's called
a Bond Magicord Machine and it's fantastic - makes I-cord in a
flash! I've just done a net search and found that you can buy them
online from Linda's Craftique at:
http://www.lindascraftique.com/bond/access.htm

Happy Shopping!
Steph :-)
------------------------------------------------------------------
Steph Thornton           Wolverhampton, England

UK Knitware agent - Pattern design software for hand
and machine knitters. Great value & easy to use.
For more details (without obligation) please contact:

------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Helen Fleische » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00


On Wed, 12 Jan 2000 02:08:23 -0800, Mary-Lou

Quote:

>on this same subject, i wonder if anyone can help with some
>information?  many years ago, i think i saw a mechanical knitting nancy
>in a (german?) magazine. you clamped it to a table-top, wrapped the
>wool round the "pins" in the normal way, and then by turning a handle,
>the device would knit cords for you (presumably quicker than the manual
>version, and less fiddly).  so, does anyone recognise this description,
>or know who might manufacture such a device ??

>thanks

>Mary-Lou

The 6-stitch all-metal cord knitter that clamps to a table top is called
a Hobby Knit and is still being made by a small company in NY that
bought the rights from Montello, the people that made mine. It's fairly
expensive and only available by direct order from the company, which
only advertises occasionally. However it is very sturdy & can even knit
fine art wire. I've made some fun jewelry on mine with the stuff.

I also own a plastic version that knits 4 stitches called the Magic
Cord, made by Bond and sold through many outlets, for much less money.
It is much less sturdy, though, and because the needles rotate rather
than the yarn feeder, the cord coming out the bottom twirls and twists
constantly, which I find extremely annoying.

Nicky Epstein reviewed several models of spool knitters, many no longer
in production, in Threads #59 on page 76, deftly hidden in the "Notes"
column. She says the Hobby-Knit is the only one that is capable of
making cord with non traditional materials like monofilament and wire,
and the only one that has replacement parts available. As I said, it's
main drawback is initial cost. As of the article it retailed for $79.95
plus $6. shipping and I think it's gone up since.

However it's been made since 1948 and there are some vintage ones out
there, still in use, so they may show up on Ebay or in second hand
shops. Yeah, tell me about it. Like anyone would part with one of these
things!  The Manufacturer/Supplier, still current  as of last year is:

Riverview Textile Studio
303 River Rd.
Grandview, NY 10960 (914)359-7829


 Helen "Halla" Fleischer,
 Fantasy & Fiber Artist in Fairland, MD USA

 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Mirjam Bruck Cohe » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Many years ago this 4 naiked spool that produced the [ straight] cord was
called all over West Europe FRENCH KNITTING , [ Do not ask me why !!!]
Knitting on Nails was quite common 2-3 centuries ago, one can produce
marvelous knits with it and even a double faced knit .
You also can make a FORK cord on a Fork with 2 tooth , you slip knot the
thread on one Tooth, roll your thread between the 2 teeth, around the
second , than crossing the former thread , over the first tooth , now slip
the loop that is on the 1st tooth over the thread, cross between the 2
teeth [ always be in X over last thread , around the 2nd tooth m slip the
under loop over the thread ,,,,,, this way you get a Flat ribbon or cord .
mirjam
 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Flor » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Hi all,

You made an I-cord using two dpn's. It's simply an stockinette st tube. Cast
on 3 sts. Knit 3. DO NOT turn work. Slide the sts to the other end of the
needle. Knit 3. Rep until length desired. Pull tightly the yarn before each
row to get a neat tube.

HTH

Flor

PS: It also works nicely onto 4 sts if using thin yarns.

Quote:
>> I have a pattern which says to cast on 3 stitches and work I-cord for
>> 12 inches.  How do you do I-cord?

>> -Dawn

 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Bob & Janet Marshal » Fri, 14 Jan 2000 04:00:00


In the old days when I was small (this side of the 1950s!) someone gave me
for Xmas another type of cordmaker.  This was a large plastic ring, quite
chunky and having small hands (I still do) this was quite difficult to hold.
All around the edges were little 'teeth' and these were for the same use as
nails on a cotton reel.  A pattern book and some yarn came with it.  However
I only used it once, as halfway along the first thing (a coat hanger cover,
wow) several of the teeth snapped off!!It was called......wait for
it.........the Knitting Ring.
Janet, Hove UK
 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Bob & Janet Marshal » Fri, 14 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Yes there is a mechanical device still available.  Try in the USA for anyone
who is a dealer for Hague Linking Machines (normally a machine knitting
shop) or for Bond machines.  It is Bond who actually make it.
For anyone in the UK, try Hague Linking Machines in Nottingham, again
machine knitting shops will help you here.
Janet, Hove, UK
Quote:

> on this same subject, i wonder if anyone can help with some
> information?  many years ago, i think i saw a mechanical knitting nancy
> in a (german?) magazine. you clamped it to a table-top, wrapped the
> wool round the "pins" in the normal way, and then by turning a handle,
> the device would knit cords for you (presumably quicker than the manual
> version, and less fiddly).  so, does anyone recognise this description,
> or know who might manufacture such a device ??

 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Mirjam Bruck Cohe » Sat, 15 Jan 2000 04:00:00


You are Right , it was A Plastic version of the older Knitting frames that
were made of Wood   mirjam


Quote:
> In the old days when I was small (this side of the 1950s!) someone gave me
> for Xmas another type of cordmaker.  This was a large plastic ring, quite
> chunky and having small hands (I still do) this was quite difficult to hold.
> All around the edges were little 'teeth' and these were for the same use as
> nails on a cotton reel.  A pattern book and some yarn came with it.  However
> I only used it once, as halfway along the first thing (a coat hanger cover,
> wow) several of the teeth snapped off!!It was called......wait for
> it.........the Knitting Ring.
> Janet, Hove UK

 
 
 

I-Cord?

Post by Mara » Mon, 24 Jan 2000 04:00:00


If you don't need to churn it out so fast, make a "Strickliesel" yourself
(this is how it is called in Germany) by hammering four nails in an empty
spool (or get one at a craft store) , loop the yarm around and always lift
the "old" loop over new yarn in front of it. Not the fastest, but surely
faster than knitting I-Cord and fun, it is a kids toy in Germany.
Mara