need help with curved hems -- PLEASE HELP!!!

need help with curved hems -- PLEASE HELP!!!

Post by Phlo » Sun, 18 Apr 2004 10:08:46



        Whenever I try to make any sort of a bodice, the hems always curl out. I've
tried everything i know, and am at my wits end. PLEASE HELP!

Thanks Much
- Birdy

 
 
 

need help with curved hems -- PLEASE HELP!!!

Post by sewingbythe.. » Sun, 18 Apr 2004 23:19:22


need help with curved hems -- PLEASE HELP!!!  


??<?Whenever I try to make any sort of a bodice, the hems always
curl out. I've tried everything i know, and am at my wits end. PLEASE
HELP!
Thanks Much
- Birdy  
---
   What type of bodice, with what fabrics? tricot for nightgown bodices?
Lined, boned formal or costume bodices? Reproduction type bodices?
   Short answers: tricot will curl to the right side. Some folks starch
the tricot for easier handling.
  On lined, boned bodices, I always trim about 1/8 inch off of the
lining fabric before mating outer to inner. This is usually enough to
exert a subtle pull on the outer fabric, forcing it to roll to the
inside minutely, just ever-so-slightly. (This t*** works well for
other applications, too, such as lined vests.)
  On bodices where you might have a shaped lower seam, you will need to
trim and grade the seam allowances close to the finished seam. I've not
had to clip this sort of seam allowance yet to get it to lie flat, but
there's always a first time for everything.  
   And a reminder: fabric has to be cut very carefully, or you may find
you've cut the lining larger than the outer (fashion) fabric. HTH.
                              Cea

 
 
 

need help with curved hems -- PLEASE HELP!!!

Post by Phlo » Tue, 20 Apr 2004 12:21:21


Quote:

> need help with curved hems -- PLEASE HELP!!!


> < Whenever I try to make any sort of a bodice, the hems always
> curl out. I've tried everything i know, and am at my wits end. PLEASE
> HELP!
> Thanks Much
> - Birdy
> ---
>    What type of bodice, with what fabrics? tricot for nightgown bodices?
> Lined, boned formal or costume bodices? Reproduction type bodices?
>    Short answers: tricot will curl to the right side. Some folks starch
> the tricot for easier handling.
>   On lined, boned bodices, I always trim about 1/8 inch off of the
> lining fabric before mating outer to inner. This is usually enough to
> exert a subtle pull on the outer fabric, forcing it to roll to the
> inside minutely, just ever-so-slightly. (This t*** works well for
> other applications, too, such as lined vests.)
>   On bodices where you might have a shaped lower seam, you will need to
> trim and grade the seam allowances close to the finished seam. I've not
> had to clip this sort of seam allowance yet to get it to lie flat, but
> there's always a first time for everything.
>    And a reminder: fabric has to be cut very carefully, or you may find
> you've cut the lining larger than the outer (fashion) fabric. HTH.
>                               Cea

I'm working with cotton muslin. It is unlined. Just hemmed.

thanks much,
- birdy

 
 
 

need help with curved hems -- PLEASE HELP!!!

Post by Me » Thu, 22 Apr 2004 13:58:23


It sounds like your curved edges are being slightly stretched during
construction. This would be easy because they are not on the straight of
grain, more toward bias. In addition to the suggestion below, making the
lining very slightly shorter than the fashion fabric so it will roll to the
inside, you may want to stay the curved edge with either stitching or twill
tape. If the bodice hem is very curved, you may want to use very large
stitches to slightly draw in the seam allowance so it will not stretch.
Patti in New Orleans

need help with curved hems -- PLEASE HELP!!!


< Whenever I try to make any sort of a bodice, the hems always
curl out. I've tried everything i know, and am at my wits end. PLEASE
HELP!
Thanks Much
- Birdy
---
   What type of bodice, with what fabrics? tricot for nightgown bodices?
Lined, boned formal or costume bodices? Reproduction type bodices?
   Short answers: tricot will curl to the right side. Some folks starch
the tricot for easier handling.
  On lined, boned bodices, I always trim about 1/8 inch off of the
lining fabric before mating outer to inner. This is usually enough to
exert a subtle pull on the outer fabric, forcing it to roll to the
inside minutely, just ever-so-slightly. (This t*** works well for
other applications, too, such as lined vests.)
  On bodices where you might have a shaped lower seam, you will need to
trim and grade the seam allowances close to the finished seam. I've not
had to clip this sort of seam allowance yet to get it to lie flat, but
there's always a first time for everything.
   And a reminder: fabric has to be cut very carefully, or you may find
you've cut the lining larger than the outer (fashion) fabric. HTH.
                              Cea