Czech euros, Hungarian euros and possibly Polish euros?

Czech euros, Hungarian euros and possibly Polish euros?

Post by Nicholas Cheu » Wed, 20 Mar 2002 17:41:41



With all this euro talk, let's put this one with an interesting twist.

Since the Czech Republic is very likely to be accepted into the EU
soon, and probably the first Eastern European country to enter, with
possibly Poland and maybe Hungary close behind, my guess is that Czech
euros will likely appear before UK, Danish and Swedish euros.

I also think Polish euros would follow Czech euros soon after.

My guess is that the next countries which will enter the Eurozone are
as follows in order:

Andorra (My guess is between 75,000 to 100,000 of each of the 8
denominations would be made per year, and very likely that Andorran 1
and 2 euro cent coins are mint-set only. )
Czech Republic
Poland
Denmark
Sweden
Hungary
UK (If you include Guernsey, Gibraltar, et al., there can exist some
really rare Euros. Falkland euros, anyone? Falkland euros likely to be
10,000 mintage or lower)

Nick

 
 
 

Czech euros, Hungarian euros and possibly Polish euros?

Post by ELur » Thu, 21 Mar 2002 12:27:52


<< Andorra (My guess is between 75,000 to 100,000 of each of the 8
denominations would be made per year, and very likely that Andorran 1
and 2 euro cent coins are mint-set only. ) >>

Andorra is already in the Eurozone. It just doesn't issue coins under it's own
name. The country produces some dinars, but they are worthless. Nobody ever
spends them.

<< Czech Republic
Poland
Denmark
Sweden
Hungary >>

The Czech republic isn't going to be let in anytime soon. Neither is Poland.
The reason is that Ireland thinks there are enough countries in there already.

<< UK (If you include Guernsey, Gibraltar, et al., there can exist some
really rare Euros. Falkland euros, anyone? Falkland euros likely to be
10,000 mintage or lower) >>

If the UK has the Euro, then I doubt that Gib or the Falklands are going to
have them. They'll have the UK's or in the case of Gib, Spain's.

But then again, the Brits hate the Euro.....

Also, we have the example of the French, who don't have "special" euros for
their overseas departments like Tahiti or San Pierre. They didn't even have
"New Francs" when the money changed back home in 1960. [well, San Pierre did,
but I have a Tahitian francs dated 1997 and they're the same design from the
1940s]

eric l.

 
 
 

Czech euros, Hungarian euros and possibly Polish euros?

Post by Dik T. Winte » Thu, 21 Mar 2002 23:32:23


 > << Andorra (My guess is between 75,000 to 100,000 of each of the 8
 > denominations would be made per year, and very likely that Andorran 1
 > and 2 euro cent coins are mint-set only. ) >>
 >
 > Andorra is already in the Eurozone.

Andorra is *not* in the Eurozone.  They are not even a member of the EU, so
how could they be in the Eurozone?  Formally also Monaco, Vatican City and
San Marino are not in the Eurozone, but they are allowed to issue Euro
coins by a special agreement.

 >                                   It just doesn't issue coins under it's own
 > name.

It is not allowed to either.

 > << UK (If you include Guernsey, Gibraltar, et al., there can exist some
 > really rare Euros. Falkland euros, anyone? Falkland euros likely to be
 > 10,000 mintage or lower) >>
 >
 > If the UK has the Euro, then I doubt that Gib or the Falklands are going to
 > have them. They'll have the UK's or in the case of Gib, Spain's.

Gibraltar has its own coins now, as have the Falklands.  The Gibraltar
coins are issued by the Government of Gibraltar.  But as Gibraltar is
a colony of the UK, I do not know whether it will come into Eurozone.
I am not even sure whether it fully falls under the EU (tax rules are
quite different and contrary to EU requirements).  Guernsey, Jersey and
the Isle of Man have their own coins (and notes) and are *not* member
of the EU, so they will not come in the Eurozone.  But the Isle of Man
has a customs agreement with the EU.  When Jersey, Guernsey and the
Isle of Man want to issue Eurocoins (after the UK steps in), they need
a special agreement like the three current ministates that issue them.

The question of the Scottish and Northern Irish banknotes will also
get interesting.

 > Also, we have the example of the French, who don't have "special" euros for
 > their overseas departments like Tahiti or San Pierre.

But those are overseas departments and fall directly under Parisian rule.
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj  amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn  amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/

 
 
 

Czech euros, Hungarian euros and possibly Polish euros?

Post by Brian Harmo » Fri, 22 Mar 2002 20:47:10



Quote:

> But then again, the Brits hate the Euro.....

Indeed!

Certainly some of the most entertaining political rhetoric
I've read in years came from some british anti-euro sites.

I have very little knowledge of the specific issues involved,
so I've no idea if it's insightful as well as fun.

--

=============================================
"Quiet you numbskulls, I'm broadcasting!
       - Moe Howard

Remove SPAMMERSDIE to send me email.

 
 
 

Czech euros, Hungarian euros and possibly Polish euros?

Post by Christian Feldha » Sun, 24 Mar 2002 03:42:56


Quote:

> Andorra is already in the Eurozone. It just doesn't issue coins under it's own
> name. The country produces some dinars, but they are worthless. Nobody ever
> spends them.

Andorra is not part of Euroland. They simply used the French franc and
the Spanish peseta for most transactions, and now use the euro cash.
Since Andorra is not an EU member, and does not have any bilateral
currency agreement with France or Spain either, it would not be possible
for the country to issue EUR coins.

(Guess that an agreement similar to the ones that apply to Monaco or San
Marino should not be difficult to come to, but currently there is no
such agreement.)

Quote:
> The Czech republic isn't going to be let in anytime soon. Neither is Poland.

These countries will, however, be EU members in a few years, possibly in
2004, possibly a little bit later. Now if or rather when they can join
the currency union, is a different question. Among the EU enlargement
"candidates", countries like Cyprus, Slovenia and Malta might be in
Euroland sooner than, say, Poland. But that doesn't have much to do with
the EU membership of these countries.

Christian

 
 
 

Czech euros, Hungarian euros and possibly Polish euros?

Post by Nicholas Cheu » Sun, 24 Mar 2002 05:08:51



Quote:

>> The Czech republic isn't going to be let in anytime soon. Neither is Poland.

>These countries will, however, be EU members in a few years, possibly in
>2004, possibly a little bit later. Now if or rather when they can join
>the currency union, is a different question. Among the EU enlargement
>"candidates", countries like Cyprus, Slovenia and Malta might be in
>Euroland sooner than, say, Poland. But that doesn't have much to do with
>the EU membership of these countries.

>Christian

Christian,

        Greece was initially not allowed into the Eurozone because I
think they were still having inflation above something like 2 or 3% a
year. I believe one of the requirements to be accepted into the
Eurozone is that the national currency has to be fairly stable. Out of
those soon to be entering the EU, the Czech Republic is the only one
likely to qualify under that rule.

        Cyprus and Malta, both have fairly stable national currencies
as well, and the Slovenian tolar is loosely linked to the Euro now.
(was loosely linked to the German DM at the rate of 100 tolar to 1 DM,
prior to the Euro takeover)

Nick