thanks to the doctor

thanks to the doctor

Post by Steve Maltma » Fri, 06 Apr 2001 23:54:41



Thanks to Dr Richard Hall.  I used the pencil and popsicle stick scale
to separate my '82 Lincolns.  It worked like a charm.  Thanks for the
tip.

Steve

 
 
 

thanks to the doctor

Post by Steve Maltma » Fri, 06 Apr 2001 23:56:41


that would be the zincs and non zincs....

Steve

Quote:

> Thanks to Dr Richard Hall.  I used the pencil and popsicle stick scale
> to separate my '82 Lincolns.  It worked like a charm.  Thanks for the
> tip.

> Steve


 
 
 

thanks to the doctor

Post by Dr. Richard L. Hal » Sat, 07 Apr 2001 00:30:49


That's teh fun part of this.  you often get to help people.

   Richard


Quote:
> Thanks to Dr Richard Hall.  I used the pencil and popsicle stick scale
> to separate my '82 Lincolns.  It worked like a charm.  Thanks for the
> tip.

> Steve

 
 
 

thanks to the doctor

Post by Adam Tigno » Sat, 07 Apr 2001 11:42:05


I think if the person has gone through that many years of school to get
their PhD then they deserve to have the title called.. I am in college
and I call my professors that have a PhD. Dr. so and so.   They deserve
the title!  HOwever, they should not mislead people to believe they are
a medical doctor, and should tell the person what they have there degree
in.



Quote:
>Nope PhD. in Physics

I've always been curious about this when it happens. I'm not trying to
be intrusive here. And this really is off topic for this newsgroup.
But since this thread has as its name "Thanks to the doctor," I
thought I'd ask why you use a Dr. in front of your name. Our society
regards Dr.'s as medical doctors. If everybody who earned a Ph.D.
starting calling themselves Dr., there'd be all kinds of confusion.
Actually, there is all kinds of confusion already with radio call-in
shows about topics such as sports medicine, nutrition, and psychology
where the host calls himself Dr. So and So and he's no M.D. but has a
Ph.D. is some unrelated subject such as art history. People are misled
(one of my pet peeves). And if Ph.D.s call themselves Dr., should
those who have earned Master degrees call themselves Master So and So
and those with Bachelor degrees Bachelor So and So? I've never really
discussed this with someone who did this. The couple of times I've
seen the question asked the person just got insulted and huffed I
earned my doctorate.
 
 
 

thanks to the doctor

Post by David T. Wan » Sat, 07 Apr 2001 11:55:57



:>Nope PhD. in Physics

: I've always been curious about this when it happens. I'm not trying to
: be intrusive here. And this really is off topic for this newsgroup.
: But since this thread has as its name "Thanks to the doctor," I
: thought I'd ask why you use a Dr. in front of your name. Our society
: regards Dr.'s as medical doctors. If everybody who earned a Ph.D.
: starting calling themselves Dr., there'd be all kinds of confusion.

PhD stands for Philisophical Doctorate.  IIRC, the PhD kind of doctor
came before the *** thirsty barbers with their jars of leeches
started calling themselves "doctors".  :)

Sometimes people distinguish the kind of doctorate they have with
"subtitles", but you are NOT to assume that all doctors are medical
one's.

Dr. Hall is not trying to confuse anyone.  His usage of his title is
perfectly normal.  

: Actually, there is all kinds of confusion already with radio call-in
: shows about topics such as sports medicine, nutrition, and psychology
: where the host calls himself Dr. So and So and he's no M.D. but has a
: Ph.D. is some unrelated subject such as art history. People are misled
: (one of my pet peeves). And if Ph.D.s call themselves Dr., should
: those who have earned Master degrees call themselves Master So and So
: and those with Bachelor degrees Bachelor So and So? I've never really
: discussed this with someone who did this. The couple of times I've
: seen the question asked the person just got insulted and huffed I
: earned my doctorate.

No, a PhD is a Doctor.  Who do you think, Dr Who is a medical doctor?

:)

--

 
 
 

thanks to the doctor

Post by Anka » Sat, 07 Apr 2001 12:10:59


school
to get their PhD then they deserve to have the title called.. I am in
college
and I call my professors that have a PhD. Dr. so and so.   They deserve
the title!  HOwever, they should not mislead people to believe they are
a medical doctor, and should tell the person what they have there degree
in."

I agree.  It's a sign of respect.

In the U.S., calling someone who has earned their PhD "Doctor" is SOP.  Be
glad you don't have to abide by the unwritten rules of "title etiquette"
prevalent in some areas of Europe.  Some titles prefixing names border on
the
ridiculous. For example, it is not uncommon to hear "Castiti Gospod Inzinir
Doktor Medved."  (The Honorable Mister Engineer Doctor Medved!!  No
kidding!)

Anka Z, BA
(But also BS on occasion)
;-)

------------------------------------------------------------
Former co-president of the once thriving, but now defunct, Tommy John Fan
Club.

 
 
 

thanks to the doctor

Post by Fred A. Murph » Sat, 07 Apr 2001 12:41:11



Quote:


> >Nope PhD. in Physics

> I've always been curious about this when it happens. I'm not trying to
> be intrusive here. And this really is off topic for this newsgroup.
> But since this thread has as its name "Thanks to the doctor," I
> thought I'd ask why you use a Dr. in front of your name. Our society
> regards Dr.'s as medical doctors. If everybody who earned a Ph.D.
> starting calling themselves Dr., there'd be all kinds of confusion.

Actually, Dr. refers to a PhD, a Doctor of Philosophy.  Many attorneys can
call themselves Dr (Juris Doctrate)., although they generally prefer Esq.
The medical field Doctors almost "stole" the Dr. honorarium, when they would
more appropriately be labelled by their specific degrees:  MD, DO, DVM, DC,
etc.

Quote:
> Actually, there is all kinds of confusion already with radio call-in
> shows about topics such as sports medicine, nutrition, and psychology
> where the host calls himself Dr. So and So and he's no M.D. but has a
> Ph.D. is some unrelated subject such as art history.

The confusion, as above, is caused by the MD, not the holder of the
Doctorate degree.

Quote:
> People are misled
> (one of my pet peeves). And if Ph.D.s call themselves Dr., should
> those who have earned Master degrees call themselves Master So and So
> and those with Bachelor degrees Bachelor So and So?

No, but they could legitimately label themselves, as they do in college
alumni bulletins, as Joe Blow, MA, or John Doe, BBA.

Quote:
>  I've never really
> discussed this with someone who did this. The couple of times I've
> seen the question asked the person just got insulted and huffed I
> earned my doctorate.

People who have earned their doct***degrees are certainly entitled to use
the honorarium.  What I have always wondered is why people use "Dr.
So-and-so" as their Usenet name, when the doct***degree, as in your art
history example, has nothing to do with the topic they're posting on.

For example, if someone is talking about the legal ramifications of a
transaction, a post by Dr. A. Tourney means something because it can be
assumed that someone with a degree in law will have a better understanding
of the topic than a layman.  However, Dr. Art History doesn't really mean
anything in the context of the discussion, and seems like puffery to me.

--
We have all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million
typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of
Shakespeare...Thanks to AOL, we know this is not possible.