E-Sylum, bargaining

E-Sylum, bargaining

Post by joecoi » Thu, 30 Sep 2004 21:04:22




Quote:

> (Snip)

>> OK, I'll keep guessing at his intent:

>> He really meant " Books are interesting, but
>>  so is other  NUMISMATIC literature. "

> I'd be more willing to believe that had he not based Ankaaz on the same
> day for pointing to two catalogs as references.  Surely they are
> 'numismatic literature', but he seemed to think them fatally flawed.

> Alan
> 'consistency counts'

Maybe he has different standards for himself. You know, in this world
there are all kinds of people. Why, there are even differences among
commercial coin grading services!!! Can you believe it? Perhaps Mr.
Goldsborugh is the Alan Hager of the numismatic literary world?

--
Joecoin

Copper is as copper does.

 
 
 

E-Sylum, bargaining

Post by Bruce Hickmot » Thu, 30 Sep 2004 21:31:29



to have written:

Quote:



>> (Snip)

>>> OK, I'll keep guessing at his intent:

>>> He really meant " Books are interesting, but
>>>  so is other  NUMISMATIC literature. "

>> I'd be more willing to believe that had he not based Ankaaz on the same
>> day for pointing to two catalogs as references.  Surely they are
>> 'numismatic literature', but he seemed to think them fatally flawed.

>> Alan
>> 'consistency counts'

>Maybe he has different standards for himself. You know, in this world
>there are all kinds of people. Why, there are even differences among
>commercial coin grading services!!! Can you believe it? Perhaps Mr.
>Goldsborugh is the Alan Hager of the numismatic literary world?

One of the two of them should sue you for that...but I'm not sure which!

Bruce

 
 
 

E-Sylum, bargaining

Post by joecoi » Fri, 01 Oct 2004 10:35:13




Quote:

> is alleged to have written:




>>> (Snip)

>>>> OK, I'll keep guessing at his intent:

>>>> He really meant " Books are interesting, but
>>>>  so is other  NUMISMATIC literature. "

>>> I'd be more willing to believe that had he not based Ankaaz on the
>>> same day for pointing to two catalogs as references.  Surely they
>>> are 'numismatic literature', but he seemed to think them fatally
>>> flawed.

>>> Alan
>>> 'consistency counts'

>>Maybe he has different standards for himself. You know, in this world
>>there are all kinds of people. Why, there are even differences among
>>commercial coin grading services!!! Can you believe it? Perhaps Mr.
>>Goldsborugh is the Alan Hager of the numismatic literary world?

> One of the two of them should sue you for that...but I'm not sure
> which!

> Bruce

Well, maybe they should both thank me for the compliment, it's sort of
like saying, "you're the Shaquille O'neal of RCC!"

--
Joecoin

Copper is as copper does.

 
 
 

E-Sylum, bargaining

Post by Aram H. Haroutunia » Sun, 03 Oct 2004 18:38:17


I had an exciting experience some time ago at one of the Long Beach
shows.  I saw a nice 1932 D Quarter in the case priced at $17.  I
asked the dealer if he would take $15.  He looked at me, paused, and
replied, "No, ....but I'll take $10."
I not only bought several other coins from him, I brought friends to
his table.  I thought to myself, "How clever.  Loss leaders at a coin
show."  True story.
Aram.
============================
On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 00:33:06 -0400, Reid Goldsborough
Quote:

>E-Sylum is a weekly email newsletter for numismatic bibliophiles
>(lovers of literature), from Wayne Homren, and is very well done. You
>can read more about it and subscribe here:

>http://www.coinbooks.org

>One of the shorts in this week's issue is about bargaining. Some truly
>bizarre things were said about this subject recently in this
>newsgroup. Here's something, on the other hand, that's truly funny
>about it, a true story from a dealer, again from E-Sylum. I'm
>paraphrasing:

>A collector comes to the dealer's table at a coin show and asks about
>a particular coin. The dealer says it's $8 and indicates that the
>price is firm. The collector tries to bargain but to no avail. The
>same collector tries the same thing with the same coin at the same
>price at the following month's coin show, also with the same result.
>The month after that, at the same show, the same collector asks for
>the price of the same coin. This time the dealer says $12. The
>collector offers $10. Deal!

 
 
 

E-Sylum, bargaining

Post by JSTONE93 » Sun, 03 Oct 2004 18:58:12


A number of times I have asked to
see a coin in a case at a show and
the dealer will take it out and before
I say anything they will say "I can let
you have it for....".  A discount from
the listed price is practically a given
for many of them.
 
 
 

E-Sylum, bargaining

Post by Reid Goldsboroug » Mon, 04 Oct 2004 03:52:09


On Sat, 02 Oct 2004 02:38:17 -0700, Aram H. Haroutunian

Quote:

>I had an exciting experience some time ago at one of the Long Beach
>shows.  I saw a nice 1932 D Quarter in the case priced at $17.  I
>asked the dealer if he would take $15.  He looked at me, paused, and
>replied, "No, ....but I'll take $10."
>I not only bought several other coins from him, I brought friends to
>his table.  I thought to myself, "How clever.  Loss leaders at a coin
>show."  True story.

Great story. I can see how you'd feel good about this dealer from then
on. And this "reverse negotiating" was a smart goodwill-generating
move on his part. It's true of course that bargaining is an integral
part of numismatics. I mentioned that story told by a dealer in
E-Sylum. That dealer also wrote, "Numismatists MUST bargain. It seems
con***."

All this is in stark contrast to the loony statements offered here
likening bargaining to begging and stealing and saying that bargaining
belongs in the Arab world, not in America. Boggles the mind, stuff
like this. All part of Usenet, where people can say virtually anything
they want, no matter how ignorant ... and DO. <g>

To each his own, again. I like bargaining, as do many others. Part of
the fun. Others, dealers and collectors, don't. But it's very much an
American practice, a long-established part of numismatics and many
other fields as well (house buying, car buying, most business deals,
etc., etc.). This of course is not to say that you'll get a favorable
response if you try negotiating prices next time you go grocery
shopping. <g>

--


Consumer: http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Connoisseur: http://www.FoundCollection.com/
Counterfeit: http://www.FoundCollection.com/

 
 
 

E-Sylum, bargaining

Post by Phil DeMa » Mon, 04 Oct 2004 04:11:48


Quote:

>All part of Usenet, where people can say virtually anything
>they want, no matter how ignorant ... and DO.

Soemthing you've proven over and over again.

++++++++++
Phil DeMayo - always here for my fellow Stooge
When bidding online always sit on your helmet
Just say NO to counterfeits

 
 
 

E-Sylum, bargaining

Post by Jeff R » Mon, 04 Oct 2004 08:19:06



Quote:
> On Sat, 02 Oct 2004 02:38:17 -0700, Aram H. Haroutunian

> >I had an exciting experience some time ago at one of the Long Beach
> >shows.  I saw a nice 1932 D Quarter in the case priced at $17.  I
> >asked the dealer if he would take $15.  He looked at me, paused, and
> >replied, "No, ....but I'll take $10."

> Great story. I can see how you'd feel good about this dealer from then
> on. And this "reverse negotiating" was a smart goodwill-generating
> move on his part. It's true of course that bargaining is an integral
> part of numismatics. I mentioned that story told by a dealer in
> E-Sylum. That dealer also wrote, "Numismatists MUST bargain. It seems
> con***."

> All this is in stark contrast to the loony statements offered here
> likening bargaining to begging and stealing and saying that bargaining
> belongs in the Arab world, not in America.

*Your* words, Reid.
You posted this.
You extrapolated the "Arab", "anti-American" connection.
YOU!

Quote:
>...Boggles the mind, stuff
> like this. All part of Usenet, where people can say virtually anything
> they want, no matter how ignorant ... and DO. <g>

Don't get it, do you!
Why did the abovementioned dealer list a price of $17 in the first place?
If a coin newbie had offered $17 for the coin, would the dealer have happily
taken it?

No problems there?

Fine.

You don't understand my point then, and probably never will.
I give up trying to explain it to you.

I can't explain morality to the immoral.

--
Jeff R.
(no-one can)