Indian Head Pennies (1894-1907): Value/Restore?

Indian Head Pennies (1894-1907): Value/Restore?

Post by Grumble » Mon, 24 Jul 2000 04:00:00



We've 7 Indian Head Pennies dated...
1894
1900
1901
1902
1904
1906
1907
...and were wondering about the value
and rarity should anyone know.

Also, these coins are dark and need to
be spiffed up. How does one go about
doing that without ruining them?

Sure would appreciate any feedback be
it on this NG or via private e-mail (remove
"block" from my e-mail address to reply).

Cheers,
-G

 
 
 

Indian Head Pennies (1894-1907): Value/Restore?

Post by Longnin » Mon, 24 Jul 2000 04:00:00


One does not "spiff up" copper. You'll only make it worse.
  ****My coins are all rogues of no lofty height, but I like 'em, 'cause
they heckle the Rainmans hype.


Quote:
> We've 7 Indian Head Pennies dated...
> 1894
> 1900
> 1901
> 1902
> 1904
> 1906
> 1907
> ...and were wondering about the value
> and rarity should anyone know.

> Also, these coins are dark and need to
> be spiffed up. How does one go about
> doing that without ruining them?

> Sure would appreciate any feedback be
> it on this NG or via private e-mail (remove
> "block" from my e-mail address to reply).

> Cheers,
> -G


 
 
 

Indian Head Pennies (1894-1907): Value/Restore?

Post by John Much » Mon, 24 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>>We've 7 Indian Head Pennies dated...
>>1894
>>1900
>>1901
>>1902
>>1904
>>1906
>>1907
>>...and were wondering about the value
>>and rarity should anyone know.

The value of these coins depends heavily on their condition ("grade").
Coins magazine has a very rough guide to grading near the back of each
issue along with a price guide you can use once you determine the
grade.  A better guide would be the "Red Book" ("A Guide Book of
United States Coins", by R.S. Yeoman).  This should be available at
your library.

I can give you rough ideas of their possible range of values though.
None are especially rare but the 1894 is worth more than the others.
Anywhere from $3 to $300 depending on the condition, with a value of
$10 or so for "typical" nice circulated condition (a VERY subjective
term but a starting point nonetheless).

The others could be worth from $1 to $135 or so, depending on the
condition, probably a few couple dollars or so.

Quote:
>>Also, these coins are dark and need to
>>be spiffed up. How does one go about
>>doing that without ruining them?

Ack!!!  There is no way to "spiff them up" and remove the toning
(darkening) without ruining their value.  Don't rub them, clean them,
or even touch them with tissue paper in any way.  You'll be amazed at
how soft the metal actually is, and any scratches, even fine hairline
scratches, will significantly lower their value.

The color and patina they have acquired over the years is a sign that
they haven't been harshly cleaned and is quite desirable.  If they are
mottled or spotted or have dark deposits on them, that can lower the
value though.  I would leave them as is.

John Muchow

 
 
 

Indian Head Pennies (1894-1907): Value/Restore?

Post by Tim Irvi » Mon, 24 Jul 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

> We've 7 Indian Head Pennies dated...
> 1894
> 1900
> 1901
> 1902
> 1904
> 1906
> 1907
> ...and were wondering about the value
> and rarity should anyone know.

On the low end (if they are heavily worn), figure a buck a piece for
the 20th century dates and maybe $3 for 1894.  These are all relatively
common dates, though 1894 commands a small premium over the most common
dates because it's somewhat less common than the others (note that I
did *not* say "scarce" or "rare" because it isn't).

If you can see the full "LIBERTY" on the headband of these coins,
they're worth a bit more -- maybe $3 or so (maybe $5 or more for the
1894).  If the coins have very little wear on them, but aren't
uncirculated, you might double the values listed immediately above for
a ballpark figure.  To know for sure, you might want to learn about how
to grade these coins if you're really interested in them and not just
interested in "what's it worth."

Quote:
> Also, these coins are dark and need to
> be spiffed up. How does one go about
> doing that without ruining them?

You probably would ruin them if you tried.  Sometimes it might be
possible for a knowledgeable professional to "spiff up" cruddy nickel,
silver or gold coins, but not copper.

--

"Trouble no one about their religion; respect others in their view, and
demand that they respect yours...Abuse no one and nothing, for abuse
turns the wise ones to fools and robs the spirit of its vision."
                -- Tecumseh (1768-1813), Shawnee chief and statesman

 
 
 

Indian Head Pennies (1894-1907): Value/Restore?

Post by Teel Adam » Mon, 24 Jul 2000 04:00:00


BTW,  just on the very rare chance.  Look at the date on the 1894 very closely,
on some there is a "repunched" date with a bold repunch on the "94" to the North
East.

If you have this variety, the value would quickly go up into the hundreds.

Quote:



> > We've 7 Indian Head Pennies dated...
> > 1894
> > 1900
> > 1901
> > 1902
> > 1904
> > 1906
> > 1907
> > ...and were wondering about the value
> > and rarity should anyone know.

> On the low end (if they are heavily worn), figure a buck a piece for
> the 20th century dates and maybe $3 for 1894.  These are all relatively
> common dates, though 1894 commands a small premium over the most common
> dates because it's somewhat less common than the others (note that I
> did *not* say "scarce" or "rare" because it isn't).

> If you can see the full "LIBERTY" on the headband of these coins,
> they're worth a bit more -- maybe $3 or so (maybe $5 or more for the
> 1894).  If the coins have very little wear on them, but aren't
> uncirculated, you might double the values listed immediately above for
> a ballpark figure.  To know for sure, you might want to learn about how
> to grade these coins if you're really interested in them and not just
> interested in "what's it worth."

> > Also, these coins are dark and need to
> > be spiffed up. How does one go about
> > doing that without ruining them?

> You probably would ruin them if you tried.  Sometimes it might be
> possible for a knowledgeable professional to "spiff up" cruddy nickel,
> silver or gold coins, but not copper.

> --

> "Trouble no one about their religion; respect others in their view, and
> demand that they respect yours...Abuse no one and nothing, for abuse
> turns the wise ones to fools and robs the spirit of its vision."
>                 -- Tecumseh (1768-1813), Shawnee chief and statesman

 
 
 

Indian Head Pennies (1894-1907): Value/Restore?

Post by Chri » Sat, 05 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>BTW,  just on the very rare chance.  Look at the date on the 1894 very closely,
>on some there is a "repunched" date with a bold repunch on the "94" to the
> North
>East.

What does "repunched" mean? Did the mint run the finished coins through a
second time for some reason? What is the definition and reason for this
"repunch" I keep seeing mentioned in this group?

thanks,
Chris

 
 
 

Indian Head Pennies (1894-1907): Value/Restore?

Post by Sam Morg » Sat, 05 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>What does "repunched" mean? Did the mint run the finished coins through a
>second time for some reason? What is the definition and reason for this
>"repunch" I keep seeing mentioned in this group?

>thanks,
>Chris

Coins are not run through the minting process a second time on purpose. When a
coin is struck twice by accident, it is called "strike doubling". (Proof coins
are struck twice or more, but that is by design, to bring up all the detail.)
Coins are made by striking a blank with a die. The dies were made without a
date or mintmark. The date and mintmark were "punched" into the die seperately.
Sometimes the punch was not done properly (incorrect placement or not deep
enough, etc.) and had to be redone with the same date or MM. Repunched means
that you can tell it has been punched more than once.
Compare to overdate/overMM: This is where a die had one date or MM and was
changed by the repunch. This was done because one mint used the die originally
made for another mint (in the case of overMM) or because the mint needed dies
to continue production and merely changed the year and kept on striking coins.
HTH Sam

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice. I do wish you
well. :-)