Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by etre » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 00:02:34



Hi,

I'm thinking of selling a few coins on Ebay, but I've never done it before.
Because I've never done it before I have absolutely no reputation in the
place. Will the hugely adversely affect my selling power?

Some of my coins are also sitting loose in bags, rather than in specific
cases (they were purchased in auctions in the seventies). What should I sell
them in?

I also don't have my coins graded - I'm a compete novice - will this have to
be done before I can sell them? Would a high quality, high resolution image
of them suffice?

Does my geographical location affect anything? I'm in the UK - should I only
sell to UK based people? How do I get my coins to them, and payment from
them?

How good should I expect the prices to be? I have, for example, a few double
eagles from the early 1900s.

Thanks in advance for any help.

 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by Bob Flamini » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 01:32:41


Quote:

> I'm thinking of selling a few coins on Ebay, but I've never done it
> before. Because I've never done it before I have absolutely no
> reputation in the place. Will the hugely adversely affect my selling
> power?

How much feedback do you have as a buyer? If you're in the
high-double-digits, you should do OK -- 100+ and you're golden.

Quote:
> Some of my coins are also sitting loose in bags, rather than in
> specific cases (they were purchased in auctions in the seventies).
> What should I sell them in?

Depends entirely on the coin in question. However, "loose in a bag" is
generally an undesirable way to sell a coin. Put them in 2x2s at least.

Quote:
> I also don't have my coins graded - I'm a compete novice - will this
> have to be done before I can sell them?

It would help to have them graded. It doesn't need to be slabbed, but
having a knowledgable numismatist take a look at it and give you an
opinion is probably better than just proclaiming your ignorance.

Quote:
> Would a high quality, high resolution image of them suffice?

A high quality image is an absolute necessity for selling on eBay, IMHO.

Quote:
> Does my geographical location affect anything? I'm in the UK - should
> I only sell to UK based people?

Depends -- selling internationally is a bit more trouble, but also
broadens your base of bidders, and potentially increasing your final
values. That's a decision each person has to make for themselves. For
me, I sell internationally and have never had any trouble with it.

Quote:
> How do I get my coins to them,

Via air post gets coins to most places in the world in 7-10 days. Make
sure to insure it, of course.

Quote:
> and payment from them?

For international buyers, PayPal, international money orders, and
Western Union AuctionPayments (formerly BidPay) are easy ways to move
money across borders. Well-concealed cash is also an option, if you're
willing to accept other currencies besides UKP.

Quote:
> How good should I expect the prices to be? I have, for example, a few
> double eagles from the early 1900s.

Depends entirely on the grade. And now that you've given us a hint as to
what you have, might I suggest that you do take the time to get them
certified. Raw gold is especially difficult to sell on eBay. Get them
slabbed by either PCGS, NGC, or ANACS, and you will realize much better
prices.

--
Bob

 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by Bill Krumme » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 02:18:30



Quote:
> Hi,

> I'm thinking of selling a few coins on Ebay, but I've never done it
before.
> Because I've never done it before I have absolutely no reputation in the
> place. Will the hugely adversely affect my selling power?

I think it will affect your selling power, although I do not know to what
degree.  Everybody starts at zero and I try to keep that in mind when I come
across a zero fb seller, but I still go into high caution mode with an
unproven seller because of so many types of sellers on eBay, from the honest
but uninformed to the fraudulent to the expert.  If I bid on a zero fb
seller, it may be because the seller has sold himself a little in the
description, as well as his item.  But that is just instincts kicking in,
and instincts are not always correct.  Keep in mind that as a low or zero fb
seller, you will attract less bids and the bidders will generally be less
trusting of your abilities to accurately describe your item, thus lower
final bids.  Be prepared to not do well with the final bids until you have
built a small reputation.

If you feel you have to have a specific minimum for an item, set that
minimum as the starting minimum bid, or start at GBP 0.50 with a reserve
(you can always reveal the reserve in your description, and I recommend
doing so).  If you are prepared to let some coins go at whatever the price
brings, sell them first and start at a give-away low with no reserve.  Offer
the best image you possibly can, and add anything pertinent in your verbal
description.  Be reasonable with your shipping and handling charges.  Offer
a liberal "no questions asked" return policy.  Communicate quickly with the
winning bidder.  Ship quickly with payments with guaranteed funds (money
order, e.g.) and when paid by less safe means (personal check), ship
promptly after the necessary hold period.  Ship a coin in secure packaging.
Leave fb either after receiving payment or after the transaction has sucessf
ully concluded, depending upon your personal choice.

As you start the process of being an eBay seller, check back to rcc with
your questions.  Many here have sold and are willing to be helpful.

Selling raw gold on eBay is tricky.  In honesty, I suspect that even if you
"know" the gold is authentic, there is a chance it is counterfeit.   Old US
gold coins have been counterfeited to a large extent, and many people think
their gold is real because it has been in the family for fifty years, but
that is not a guarantee that the coin is authentic.  It may be advantageous
to pay to have the gold authenticated, hopefully with no unpleasant
surprises when the coins come back.

Bill

Quote:

> Some of my coins are also sitting loose in bags, rather than in specific
> cases (they were purchased in auctions in the seventies). What should I
sell
> them in?

> I also don't have my coins graded - I'm a compete novice - will this have
to
> be done before I can sell them? Would a high quality, high resolution
image
> of them suffice?

> Does my geographical location affect anything? I'm in the UK - should I
only
> sell to UK based people? How do I get my coins to them, and payment from
> them?

> How good should I expect the prices to be? I have, for example, a few
double
> eagles from the early 1900s.

> Thanks in advance for any help.

 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by James Higb » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 03:12:43


In my book, a large, clear photo is most important.  A close second is that
you would accept PayPal.  A lot of sellers complain about the fees (around
3%), but from the point of view of a buyer, that saves me 1) time and
resources going to the post office, 2) time standing in line at the post
office for a money order, 3) the cost of the money order, 4) the cost of the
stamp, 5) the extra waiting time for payment to get to you, 6) the risk that
the payment won't get to you.  And, even though you are not allowed to put
on a surcharge for using PayPal, I'd still be happy to pay it in order to
avoid the hassle.  Finally, charge a fair price for shipping.  Some eBay
vendors go overboard on this and engender quite a bit of negative commentary
on this newsgroup and elsewhere.

Good luck on your endeavour (I spelled it the British way!) and we look
forward to seeing your wares on eBay.


Quote:
> Hi,

> I'm thinking of selling a few coins on Ebay, but I've never done it
before.
> Because I've never done it before I have absolutely no reputation in the
> place. Will the hugely adversely affect my selling power?

> Some of my coins are also sitting loose in bags, rather than in specific
> cases (they were purchased in auctions in the seventies). What should I
sell
> them in?

> I also don't have my coins graded - I'm a compete novice - will this have
to
> be done before I can sell them? Would a high quality, high resolution
image
> of them suffice?

> Does my geographical location affect anything? I'm in the UK - should I
only
> sell to UK based people? How do I get my coins to them, and payment from
> them?

> How good should I expect the prices to be? I have, for example, a few
double
> eagles from the early 1900s.

> Thanks in advance for any help.

 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by Gary Loveles » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 05:04:23




Quote:



>> Hi,

>> I'm thinking of selling a few coins on Ebay, but I've never done it
>before.
>> Because I've never done it before I have absolutely no reputation in the
>> place. Will the hugely adversely affect my selling power?

>I think it will affect your selling power, although I do not know to what
>degree.  Everybody starts at zero and I try to keep that in mind when I come
>across a zero fb seller, but I still go into high caution mode with an
>unproven seller because of so many types of sellers on eBay, from the honest
>but uninformed to the fraudulent to the expert.  If I bid on a zero fb
>seller, it may be because the seller has sold himself a little in the
>description, as well as his item.  But that is just instincts kicking in,
>and instincts are not always correct.  Keep in mind that as a low or zero fb
>seller, you will attract less bids and the bidders will generally be less
>trusting of your abilities to accurately describe your item, thus lower
>final bids.  Be prepared to not do well with the final bids until you have
>built a small reputation.

Bill -

        That is a huge leap of faith to bid on a zero feedback
seller!!!!  General rule of thumb is to avoid them at all
costs.........usually.

Gary

"no questions asked" return policy.  Communicate quickly with the

 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by PCamero » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 05:18:40



Quote:

> Bill -

> That is a huge leap of faith to bid on a zero feedback
> seller!!!!  General rule of thumb is to avoid them at all
> costs.........usually.

If everyone did that no one would ever get feedback because no one would
ever get bids!

I agree with you Gary it's just that it sounds like "Sorry we can't hire you
because you have no experience".

 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by Dale Hallmar » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 05:25:37



Quote:



> > Bill -

> > That is a huge leap of faith to bid on a zero feedback
> > seller!!!!  General rule of thumb is to avoid them at all
> > costs.........usually.

> If everyone did that no one would ever get feedback because no one would
> ever get bids!

You can also get feedback by buying.

Dale

 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by Clif » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 05:19:12


Quote:



>> Bill -

>> That is a huge leap of faith to bid on a zero feedback
>> seller!!!!  General rule of thumb is to avoid them at all
>> costs.........usually.

>If everyone did that no one would ever get feedback because no one would
>ever get bids!

>I agree with you Gary it's just that it sounds like "Sorry we can't hire you
>because you have no experience".

You can start off by selling lesser expensive items.  I'll buy
something for up to 10 to 20 dollars from a 0 to 10 feedback seller
but I won't buy something that goes for over 50 to 100 dollars unless
I see 40 or 50 positive feedback.  If the seller has some negative
feedback I'll read it and then decide if I'll bid.
You can build your feedback up by bidding on inexpensive items and
winning the.
You might end up with feedback like mine.  I have a few favorite
sellers and while I buy from other sellers I always bid on auctions
from those sellers and now I have about 1200 positive feedback but
only 482 unique feedback.  I've been buying on ebay for several years
but if you look at my unique feedback total you'll think I haven't
been at it that long.
Good luck selling your stuff but I would start off buying some
inexpensive things just to get used to the way ebay works and for gosh
sakes, take Paypal.  I, usually, won't bid on an auction I can't pay
for with paypal.
Cliff/ebay N5GWU
 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by Bob Flamini » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 05:44:46


Quote:

>> That is a huge leap of faith to bid on a zero feedback
>> seller!!!!  General rule of thumb is to avoid them at all
>> costs.........usually.

> If everyone did that no one would ever get feedback because no one
> would ever get bids!

True, everyone's gotta start somewhere, but a 0-feedback eBayer selling
double eagles does not raise one's confidence. Perhaps moreso than the
spectre of getting ripped off, you're still dealing with an
inexperienced person, and trouble might arise from the person just not
knowing how the system works. It wouldn't be enough to stop me from
bidding, but I would lower my bid accordingly.

The way to start is either through low value items, perhaps no more than
$20; and through buying. Get comfortable with the eBay way of doing
business. I would suggest waiting until you get to 50 feedbacks (blue
star) before starting in on selling high dollar items.

Of course, there are variables. Does the OP want to sell out quickly, or
does he have the luxury of time to build feedback? Is he looking for the
best price, or just looking to unload ASAP? Guidance can be provided,
but ultimately each newbie needs to answer those questions for
themselves.

--
Bob

 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by Clif » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 05:54:38


Quote:


>>> That is a huge leap of faith to bid on a zero feedback
>>> seller!!!!  General rule of thumb is to avoid them at all
>>> costs.........usually.

>> If everyone did that no one would ever get feedback because no one
>> would ever get bids!

>True, everyone's gotta start somewhere, but a 0-feedback eBayer selling
>double eagles does not raise one's confidence. Perhaps moreso than the
>spectre of getting ripped off, you're still dealing with an
>inexperienced person, and trouble might arise from the person just not
>knowing how the system works. It wouldn't be enough to stop me from
>bidding, but I would lower my bid accordingly.

>The way to start is either through low value items, perhaps no more than
>$20; and through buying. Get comfortable with the eBay way of doing
>business. I would suggest waiting until you get to 50 feedbacks (blue
>star) before starting in on selling high dollar items.

>Of course, there are variables. Does the OP want to sell out quickly, or
>does he have the luxury of time to build feedback? Is he looking for the
>best price, or just looking to unload ASAP? Guidance can be provided,
>but ultimately each newbie needs to answer those questions for
>themselves.

If the OP is in a big hurry to sell then perhaps he should investigate
using a coin trading assistant and letting that person do the selling.
Of course that involves a high level of trust in the seller.  YMMV
Cliff
 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by Gary Loveles » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 07:47:28




Quote:



>> Bill -

>> That is a huge leap of faith to bid on a zero feedback
>> seller!!!!  General rule of thumb is to avoid them at all
>> costs.........usually.

>If everyone did that no one would ever get feedback because no one would
>ever get bids!

>I agree with you Gary it's just that it sounds like "Sorry we can't hire you
>because you have no experience".

I started out buy building up my feedback by becoming a frenzied
buyer, after about 25 unique feedbacks, I started selling...had no
problems since......well i got one neutral.....but 133
positives........

Gary

'and has NO negatives...........'

 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by Marsellus Wallac » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 07:55:37



Quote:
> Hi,

> I'm thinking of selling a few coins on Ebay, but I've never done it
before.
> Because I've never done it before I have absolutely no reputation in the
> place. Will the hugely adversely affect my selling power?

Yes, it will adversely affect it tremendously. One quick method, before you
read the rest of my response, might be if you have a friend who is already
successfully selling coins on eBay, and knows all the ins and outs, is to
consign your coins to him (someone you can implicitly trust..) .. and let
him do all the listings and selling for you for a small percentage to
compensate him for his time. Say 15% of whatever it sells for is not
unreasonable. You'll lose a little bit of money that way, but you can also
sit by his side and watch what he does and learn the procedures yourself,
which is absolutely the best way to learn how to do anything. If you took
your coins to a dealer and toss them on the counter and say "How much will
you give me for these??" you will lose a LOT more than 15% of what the
"book" value of the coins are.

Quote:
> Some of my coins are also sitting loose in bags, rather than in specific
> cases (they were purchased in auctions in the seventies). What should I
sell
> them in?

Depends on what they are. Gold bruises very easily and should be in some
kind of holder. Any coin that is worth more than a few cents should at the
very least be in a Mylar plastic flip. The more valuable the coin, the
better it should be protected. If you have hundreds of old beat up Wheat
Cents that you have searched through for key dates and found none, then it's
quite common to put them in something like a Zip Lok bag, and roll it up
tightly and put a band of tape around it so the coins don't bang against
each other in transit. What you put the coins in, if they are all raw,
meaning not in Grading Company Slabs, is up to you, but you can get some
pretty pissed off buyers if they buy an expensive coin from you (and
everyone's definition of expensive is different..) .. you do something like
tape it to a 3x5 card and throw it in an envelope and stick a 37 cent stamp
on it..

At the very least, a Mylar plastic flip. If you want to get fancier, 2x2
plastic snap-shut two part holders made to fit that size coin. There are
also cardboard 2x2 holders with a plastic window that need to be stapled to
keep them closed. There is a whole art to stapling them closed. Believe it
or not, when it comes to buying and selling and storing and shipping coins,
technique is everything.

Quote:
> I also don't have my coins graded - I'm a compete novice - will this have
to
> be done before I can sell them? Would a high quality, high resolution
image
> of them suffice?

Some buyers are more comfortable buying coins over a certain price level,
and that level is different for everyone, if the coins are graded and
slabbed first. It makes no sense to have a coin worth $5.00 slabbed. It
makes total sense to have Gold coins slabbed, since so many have been
counterfeited over the years, and to have Key Date coins slabbed, to
guarantee they are authentic, and not altered coins. For instance, many
unscrupulous bastards have altered 1944-D Lincoln Cents which are as common
as dirt by altering the first "4" to look like a "1" and then selling it as
the rare Key Date 1914-D cent which is worth hundreds of dollars in low
grades to many thousands of dollars in High Grades.

So people with half a brain will be extremely hesitant to buy a Key Date,
especially an expensive one, if it is not authenticated and slabbed.

The better the image you can take of the coin, the better it will do. You
need a good digital camera or a scanner, a good lighting setup, and image
processing software, which can range from free to expensive.
You have to learn the meaning of the word "crop." You don't want to shoot a
picture of a coin that looks like it's sitting on a sofa on the other side
of the room, so small you can't even tell what it is. You also don't want to
shoot and upload to your auction such a high resolution picture (many
hundreds of Kilobytes) so that it takes forever to load.

Quote:
> Does my geographical location affect anything? I'm in the UK - should I
only
> sell to UK based people? How do I get my coins to them, and payment from
> them?

Okay, that nulls out a lot of what I said above, since I know zilch about UK
coins, but if you are selling USA coins, then what I said above still holds.
UK based people who collect UK coins tend not to care all that much about
having them slabbed, from what I have read here over the years. It's mainly
Americans who are slab-crazy :) ..

This is a whole 'nuther kettle of fish. Sell to the market who is most
likely to buy what you're selling. Selling across an ocean to USA buyers
involves Customs paperwork, and higher  postage cost and longer transit
times. Selling into your own country, or the UK plus Europe is probably your
best bet. People like dealing with sellers who are reachable easily, and
aren't 12 time zones away.

This doesn't mean people outside the UK or EU countries won't bid on your
stuff. You simply never know who will want something you're selling. So you
have to educate yourself in how to pack stuff to send within the UK, and how
to pack stuff to send outside the UK, including the relevant Customs
Paperwork, Insurance forms, and so on.  Or, when you post an Auction, you
can limit what geographical areas you will ship to and forbid people outside
the UK from bidding. That's up to you.

Quote:
> How good should I expect the prices to be? I have, for example, a few
double
> eagles from the early 1900s.

There's absolutely no way to tell you "how good" the prices will be without
knowing the condition of the coins, and whether they are common date or
rarer dates. At the very least, a Double Eagle US $20.00 Gold Piece has a
value of an ounce of Gold. About $400.00. At the very most, hundreds of
thousands of dollars, if it's a rare Key date in Superb Gem condition. And
anywhere in between.  You're going to have to research what you have, learn
how to grade them, and then price your auction so that you don't***
yourself, but not price things so high that no one will bid on them either.
This takes time and practice and is not something you can learn over night.

Quote:
> Thanks in advance for any help.

As someone else, Cliff I think, also suggested, people nowadays are into
instant gratification. Putting PayPal on your auctions will get you more
bids. What if a Collector in the USA wins a $500.00 coin from you and you
don't take PayPal??.. Then he has to find out what kind of payment you will
accept, buy some kind of International Money Order or cheque, Air Mail it to
you which can take up to a week, wait for you to get it and acknowledge that
you got it, and then wait for you to ship the coin back to him. And you have
to figure out how much it will cost to ship and insure, get the proper
packing supplies, and so on.

Entire books have been written about how to sell stuff on eBay.

As others have mentioned, if you start out with zero (0) feedback, people
will be extremely hesitant to buy expensive coins from you since you have no
reputation on eBay at all. It's best if you build up some feedback first,
either by selling inexpensive items, or buy buying some inexpensive items
and getting feedback from sellers.

Everyone starts out with (0) feedback and everyone wants to accumulate high
feedback numbers and not get any negatives. This takes time. It takes
education in how to photograph coins, how to grade them, how to pack and
ship them, how to transact business with strangers,  there are all kinds of
nuances to it.

The questions you've asked are almost like asking "How do I fix a car?" or
"How do I re-wire a house?" or "How do I raise hogs for fun and profit?"

The answer is education. Learn the basics. Learn as much as you can. Look at
how other people do it successfully. Look at how other people fail. Read as
much as you can. If you ask questions, be as specific as you can.

I could literally sit here and write 100,000 words about selling stuff on
eBay. Start by doing research, reading, even go buy a book about it. If you
just dive in with no idea what you're doing, you're going to be one very
unhappy person. Seasoned coin collectors can be obsessive compulsive
perfectionists about what they buy and sell. After all, money doesn't grow
on trees, and no one wants to buy something and get it and find out it's not
what it looked like when it was advertised. You have to create a
presentation, learn the fine art of advertising, writing descriptions,
photography, packing, shipping, and customer satisfaction.

I'll stop there, otherwise, I'll be writing all day..

Harv

 
 
 

Ebay Beginner Advice Please

Post by Bill Krumme » Sat, 05 Jun 2004 09:29:43



Quote:




> >> Hi,

> >> I'm thinking of selling a few coins on Ebay, but I've never done it
> >before.
> >> Because I've never done it before I have absolutely no reputation in
the
> >> place. Will the hugely adversely affect my selling power?

> >I think it will affect your selling power, although I do not know to what
> >degree.  Everybody starts at zero and I try to keep that in mind when I
come
> >across a zero fb seller, but I still go into high caution mode with an
> >unproven seller because of so many types of sellers on eBay, from the
honest
> >but uninformed to the fraudulent to the expert.  If I bid on a zero fb
> >seller, it may be because the seller has sold himself a little in the
> >description, as well as his item.  But that is just instincts kicking in,
> >and instincts are not always correct.  Keep in mind that as a low or zero
fb
> >seller, you will attract less bids and the bidders will generally be less
> >trusting of your abilities to accurately describe your item, thus lower
> >final bids.  Be prepared to not do well with the final bids until you
have
> >built a small reputation.

> Bill -

> That is a huge leap of faith to bid on a zero feedback
> seller!!!!  General rule of thumb is to avoid them at all
> costs.........usually.

> Gary

Maybe I should, ahem, expound a little.  I would consider a bid on a zero fb
seller as a gamble, although not necessarily a huge gamble.  I would not lay
$500 or even $100 on a coin from a zero fb seller, but I may consider
bidding $20, $30, maybe a few bucks more.  Everything comes into play with a
zero fb seller; the quality of the image (very important since I can not
trust the seller's ability to grade), the manner of the verbal description,
is the seller selling 100 items or a  handful and how do those item's
auctions look, where is the seller located, how long has the seller been
registered on eBay, on and on.  If I am comfortable, I can bid a few bucks.
The upside is that I have very few competitors because most are shying away
from the zero fb seller.

It's funny.  Several have posted suggesting the OP buy some items to build
some fb.   I always run as fast as I can from a seller who has oh, say 50
fbs, all as a buyer,  and now that guy is selling  double eagles.  To me,
that just says set-up all over it, and I won't take the gamble.  Iows, I
would bid on a zero fb seller long before I would bid on a seller with a fb
of 35, all fb from purchases of $10 items.

I was never a zero fb seller, so I can't relate how it was to be a zero fb
seller.  I did quite a bit of buying on eBay before I started selling.  I am
taking this opportunity to show off the first eBay fb I ever received,
bottom of this page;

http://cgi2.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewFeedback&userid=dqueens...

or  http://tinyurl.com/2xsb2

Bill