MT: Cinco De Mayo

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by AN » Tue, 09 May 2000 04:00:00



                                                      Transcript No. 1980
                                                      May 5, 2000

                               CINCO DE MAYO
                           by Nawana Britenriker

    Today is the celebration of "Cinco de Mayo."  Many believe Cinco de
Mayo is Mexico's Independence Day.  Though it's celebrated in much the same
way as we Americans celebrate our Fourth of July, the day actually
commemorates a victory against French forces.

    In 1861--while the United States was occupied with its own Civil
War--European governments, disgusted with Mexico's civil struggles and
repeated defaults on debt, signed an agreement dividing Mexico among the
Spanish, British and French.  France invaded Mexico in 1862, and Napoleon
the Third installed the Archduke Maximilian of Austria as Emperor of
Mexico.

    Maximilian issued coins featuring designs and legends similar to those
of European monarchs.  Some coins bare a striking resemblance to Napoleon
III's own French coins.

    Despite Maximilian's efforts to institute agrarian reforms and
modernize education, Mexicans despised his regime.  His coins, the basis
for the nation's entire economy, were unpopular and suspect because of
their European origins.  It was one of the major reasons why the Mexican
people rose up against him.

    The Liberal Reform movement, led by Benito Juarez, attracted a large
following of peasants, artisans, intellectuals and radical clerics.
Although Juarez appointed regular army officers to lead the peasants, he
also recruited a few thousand Civil War veterans from the United States.

    The first major victory for Juarez's troops was on the 5th of May in
1862.  But it wasn't until five years later that the Mexican people finally
triumphed.  Maximilian surrendered, was tried by a military court and shot
by a firing squad.  It's this triumph that Mexicans celebrate on "Cinco de
Mayo."

    Today's program was written by Nawana Britenriker.  "Money Talks" is a
copyrighted production of the American Numismatic Association, 818 N.

http://www.money.org.

 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by Bob Peters » Tue, 09 May 2000 04:00:00



writes:

Quote:

>One wonders why none of the above appeared in Money Talks.

>RW Julian

because its not PC.  the PC thing to do would be to claim somehow the US stole
land from mexico (land it stole from spain who stole it from the indigineous
tribes, etc) and should give back CA, NM, AZ, TX, .... to mexico.  In the case
of CA maybe not such a bad idea.  :-)


Learn all about how the NSA spys on you.  Search on "Project Echelon" at your
favorite search engine.  Another service brought to you by the Clintons.

 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by scottishmo.. » Tue, 09 May 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> This Money Talks is not even close to being accurate. Just to give one
> example, the Mexican people did not rise up and throw out the French;
> the U.S. government forced them out. In effect we handed Juarez back
his
> country on a silver platter, a politically incorrect fact.

> And for those interested in a little further history... The SOLE favor
> asked of Juarez for freeing Mexico from the French? Do not shoot
> Maximilian because this would cause the U.S. serious diplomatic
problems
> with several European governments. This request was made personally by
> General Phil Sheridan, who had armed Juarez with 30,000 U.S. rifles on
> his own authority. For his troubles Juarez treated Sheridan like dirt
> and then shot Maximilian.

> One wonders why none of the above appeared in Money Talks.

> RW Julian

Well because in the spirit of things that would not be politically
correct.  Maximilian really did not even deserve to be shot, if they
should have executed anybody it should have been the people pulling the
puppet strings back in France.

The US Army was a major factor in the eventual defeat of the French
forces, whilst it was not involved in the fighting, the presence on the
border concerned the French forces enough to have to move some of their
forces nearer to the border to oppose a possible invasion.  This took a
lot of burden off the Mexican forces, permitting them victories that
might not have been possible otherwise.  The French took advantage of
the Civil War in the USA to go in and make a colony out of Mexico, in
contravention of the Monroe Doctrine.

Dave

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by Jorg Luek » Wed, 10 May 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> This Money Talks is not even close to being accurate. Just to give one
> example, the Mexican people did not rise up and throw out the French;
> the U.S. government forced them out. In effect we handed Juarez back his
> country on a silver platter, a politically incorrect fact.

I think the battle on the 5th of May did occurr before Sheridan and the U.S.
showed up and armed the Mexican troops.  The eventual expulsion can certainly be
attributed to the United States help in both men and supplies.

Quote:

> And for those interested in a little further history... The SOLE favor
> asked of Juarez for freeing Mexico from the French? Do not shoot
> Maximilian because this would cause the U.S. serious diplomatic problems
> with several European governments. This request was made personally by
> General Phil Sheridan, who had armed Juarez with 30,000 U.S. rifles on
> his own authority. For his troubles Juarez treated Sheridan like dirt
> and then shot Maximilian.

> One wonders why none of the above appeared in Money Talks.

> RW Julian


> >                                                       Transcript No. 1980
> >                                                       May 5, 2000

> >                                CINCO DE MAYO
> >                            by Nawana Britenriker

> >     Today is the celebration of "Cinco de Mayo."  Many believe Cinco de
> > Mayo is Mexico's Independence Day.  Though it's celebrated in much the same
> > way as we Americans celebrate our Fourth of July, the day actually
> > commemorates a victory against French forces.

> >     In 1861--while the United States was occupied with its own Civil
> > War--European governments, disgusted with Mexico's civil struggles and
> > repeated defaults on debt, signed an agreement dividing Mexico among the
> > Spanish, British and French.  France invaded Mexico in 1862, and Napoleon
> > the Third installed the Archduke Maximilian of Austria as Emperor of
> > Mexico.

> >     Maximilian issued coins featuring designs and legends similar to those
> > of European monarchs.  Some coins bare a striking resemblance to Napoleon
> > III's own French coins.

> >     Despite Maximilian's efforts to institute agrarian reforms and
> > modernize education, Mexicans despised his regime.  His coins, the basis
> > for the nation's entire economy, were unpopular and suspect because of
> > their European origins.  It was one of the major reasons why the Mexican
> > people rose up against him.

> >     The Liberal Reform movement, led by Benito Juarez, attracted a large
> > following of peasants, artisans, intellectuals and radical clerics.
> > Although Juarez appointed regular army officers to lead the peasants, he
> > also recruited a few thousand Civil War veterans from the United States.

> >     The first major victory for Juarez's troops was on the 5th of May in
> > 1862.  But it wasn't until five years later that the Mexican people finally
> > triumphed.  Maximilian surrendered, was tried by a military court and shot
> > by a firing squad.  It's this triumph that Mexicans celebrate on "Cinco de
> > Mayo."

> >     Today's program was written by Nawana Britenriker.  "Money Talks" is a
> > copyrighted production of the American Numismatic Association, 818 N.

> > http://www.money.org.

--
It seemed as though a jewel, a sapphire laced in gold,
had plummeted from Heaven's gate containing laughing souls.
 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by ELur » Wed, 10 May 2000 04:00:00


Golly, you guys have screwed it up yet again!!!!

The fifth of May is celebrated as the anniversery of Santa Anna's defeat of the
Spanish in the 1820s, something that confirmed Mexican independance.

eric l.

 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by Jay S Jackso » Wed, 10 May 2000 04:00:00


Howdy & Buenos Dias, y'all!!

NO! NO! NO!

It was the Battle of Puebla in 1862.  Leader of the Mexican forces was Zaragoza who
was born in good ole' Texas in 1830's!!!  Badly out-numbered Mexican peasant forces
defeated 'crack' French forces...led to one of the Foreign Legion's proudest
moments...but that's 'nother story...

Jay in Garrison, TX

Quote:

> Golly, you guys have screwed it up yet again!!!!

> The fifth of May is celebrated as the anniversery of Santa Anna's defeat of the
> Spanish in the 1820s, something that confirmed Mexican independance.

> eric l.

 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by John DeBo » Wed, 10 May 2000 04:00:00


In New Mexico its just used as another excuse to get drunk, as if we didn't have enough
drunks already.

Quote:

> It was the Battle of Puebla in 1862.  Leader of the Mexican forces was Zaragoza who
> was born in good ole' Texas in 1830's!!!  Badly out-numbered Mexican peasant forces
> defeated 'crack' French forces...led to one of the Foreign Legion's proudest
> moments...but that's 'nother story...

> Jay in Garrison, TX

--

 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by Borr » Wed, 10 May 2000 04:00:00


Okay, idiotic Canuk here, I know nothing at all about any of this, this is
not to say its not interesting but, I have a question probably in no way
related to any of this, so here goes:

What was the "Santa Patricia Brigade"? I know they fought in a Mexican War,
against the Americans, but can find nothing further.

I realize this has nothing to do with coins at all, but you guys in this
thread really seem to have your historical (hysterical not) arguments in
order. I am impressed and not one of you with a Ph.D

Can any of you direct me to publications that may contain information on the
Santa Patricia Brigade?

Thanks,


Quote:


> > Golly, you guys have screwed it up yet again!!!!

> > The fifth of May is celebrated as the anniversery of Santa Anna's defeat
of the
> > Spanish in the 1820s, something that confirmed Mexican independance.

> > eric l.

> Umm what exactly are you talking about?
> September 16th 1810 the war for independence began and is now the national
> holiday.  Santa Anna defeated the Spanish at the siege of Tampico which
lasted from
> July to October of 1829.  I fail to see how that event correlated to Cinco
de Mayo
> especially in light of the fact that the battle in 1862 happened to occur
on may
> 5th.

> --
> It seemed as though a jewel, a sapphire laced in gold,
> had plummeted from Heaven's gate containing laughing souls.

 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by Jorg Luek » Thu, 11 May 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Golly, you guys have screwed it up yet again!!!!

> The fifth of May is celebrated as the anniversery of Santa Anna's defeat of the
> Spanish in the 1820s, something that confirmed Mexican independance.

> eric l.

Umm what exactly are you talking about?
September 16th 1810 the war for independence began and is now the national
holiday.  Santa Anna defeated the Spanish at the siege of Tampico which lasted from
July to October of 1829.  I fail to see how that event correlated to Cinco de Mayo
especially in light of the fact that the battle in 1862 happened to occur on may
5th.

--
It seemed as though a jewel, a sapphire laced in gold,
had plummeted from Heaven's gate containing laughing souls.

 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by Jay S Jackso » Thu, 11 May 2000 04:00:00


Howdy, Borru!

I know this one.  The "San Patricios" were Irish-Catholic immigrants who were in
the US military services who couldn't fight the Catholic Mexican forces in
1847.  These men were recent immigrants to the US (remember the 'Potato
Famine"?) and were not that loyal to the US government due to anti-Irish,
anti-immigrant, anti-Catholic discrimination which was rampant in the US at that
time.  I'm not sure how many their were, but IIRC, it was the only mass
defection in US military history.
BTW, does 'Borru' mean your Gaelic, from the 'oulde sod', related to Bryan?
HTH.

Jay in Garrison, TX

Quote:

> Okay, idiotic Canuk here, I know nothing at all about any of this, this is
> not to say its not interesting but, I have a question probably in no way
> related to any of this, so here goes:

> What was the "Santa Patricia Brigade"? I know they fought in a Mexican War,
> against the Americans, but can find nothing further.

> I realize this has nothing to do with coins at all, but you guys in this
> thread really seem to have your historical (hysterical not) arguments in
> order. I am impressed and not one of you with a Ph.D

> Can any of you direct me to publications that may contain information on the
> Santa Patricia Brigade?

> Thanks,




> > > Golly, you guys have screwed it up yet again!!!!

> > > The fifth of May is celebrated as the anniversery of Santa Anna's defeat
> of the
> > > Spanish in the 1820s, something that confirmed Mexican independance.

> > > eric l.

> > Umm what exactly are you talking about?
> > September 16th 1810 the war for independence began and is now the national
> > holiday.  Santa Anna defeated the Spanish at the siege of Tampico which
> lasted from
> > July to October of 1829.  I fail to see how that event correlated to Cinco
> de Mayo
> > especially in light of the fact that the battle in 1862 happened to occur
> on may
> > 5th.

> > --
> > It seemed as though a jewel, a sapphire laced in gold,
> > had plummeted from Heaven's gate containing laughing souls.

 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by pomponio1.. » Sun, 14 May 2000 04:00:00




Quote:
> Howdy & Buenos Dias, y'all!!

> NO! NO! NO!

> It was the Battle of Puebla in 1862.  Leader of the Mexican forces was
Zaragoza who
> was born in good ole' Texas in 1830's!!!  Badly out-numbered Mexican
peasant forces
> defeated 'crack' French forces...led to one of the Foreign Legion's
proudest
> moments...but that's 'nother story...

> Jay in Garrison, TX

You must be talking about Camaron and that guy's hand...

Vive la guerre, vive la mort, vive la legion etrangere all that...

(Great grandaddy would roll in his tomb if he heard me say this, at
Puebla he got hurt --really badly-- by the Zouves...c'est la guerre.)

Saludos

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by pomponio1.. » Sun, 14 May 2000 04:00:00


Check out "One Man's Hero" with Tom Berenger and Daniela Romo.  Its
hollywoodized but it can give you an idea of the San Patricios.  Those
irishmen are still revered and honored in Mexico.



Quote:
> Okay, idiotic Canuk here, I know nothing at all about any of this,
this is
> not to say its not interesting but, I have a question probably in no
way
> related to any of this, so here goes:

> What was the "Santa Patricia Brigade"? I know they fought in a Mexican
War,
> against the Americans, but can find nothing further.

> I realize this has nothing to do with coins at all, but you guys in
this
> thread really seem to have your historical (hysterical not) arguments
in
> order. I am impressed and not one of you with a Ph.D

> Can any of you direct me to publications that may contain information
on the
> Santa Patricia Brigade?

> Thanks,




> > > Golly, you guys have screwed it up yet again!!!!

> > > The fifth of May is celebrated as the anniversery of Santa Anna's
defeat
> of the
> > > Spanish in the 1820s, something that confirmed Mexican
independance.

> > > eric l.

> > Umm what exactly are you talking about?
> > September 16th 1810 the war for independence began and is now the
national
> > holiday.  Santa Anna defeated the Spanish at the siege of Tampico
which
> lasted from
> > July to October of 1829.  I fail to see how that event correlated to
Cinco
> de Mayo
> > especially in light of the fact that the battle in 1862 happened to
occur
> on may
> > 5th.

> > --
> > It seemed as though a jewel, a sapphire laced in gold,
> > had plummeted from Heaven's gate containing laughing souls.

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
 
 
 

MT: Cinco De Mayo

Post by PFDJ » Mon, 15 May 2000 04:00:00


When are you guys gonna stop arguing about my uncle Cinco ??
+++++++++
Phil DeMayo
Member Coinmasters and ANA
When bidding online always sit on your helmet