S.S. Central America show on History channel

S.S. Central America show on History channel

Post by Mar » Fri, 15 Dec 2000 14:46:06



I caught some of the show on the SS Central America salvage on History
channel last nite. I didn't see what the coins were stored in on the ship.
How were the gold coins preserved well enough to make MS66, which a close
up showed one to be. I think it was a PCGS slab.

Thanks ,
Mark

 
 
 

S.S. Central America show on History channel

Post by Michael G. Koerne » Fri, 15 Dec 2000 16:28:36


Quote:

> I caught some of the show on the SS Central America salvage on History
> channel last nite. I didn't see what the coins were stored in on the ship.
> How were the gold coins preserved well enough to make MS66, which a close
> up showed one to be. I think it was a PCGS slab.

> Thanks ,
> Mark

Gold is a non-reactive metal.  Such preservation is normal, as long as
the coins are not otherwise disturbed.

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S.S. Central America show on History channel

Post by John Much » Fri, 15 Dec 2000 16:52:34


Quote:
>>Gold is a non-reactive metal.  Such preservation is normal, as long as
>>the coins are not otherwise disturbed.

Ahh, but the copper (and other metals too?) in US gold coins is.  A
lot of folks, myself included, don't like the fact that this copper
can be corroded away but the coin still graded MS.

John Muchow

 
 
 

S.S. Central America show on History channel

Post by David Rya » Fri, 15 Dec 2000 18:25:49


Quote:

> >>Gold is a non-reactive metal.  Such preservation is normal, as long as
> >>the coins are not otherwise disturbed.

> Ahh, but the copper (and other metals too?) in US gold coins is.  A
> lot of folks, myself included, don't like the fact that this copper
> can be corroded away but the coin still graded MS.

> John Muchow

Most gold coins show some degree of toning, turning orange-gold,
green-gold or pink-gold.  There are occasional copper-rich alloy
imperfections that turn to brown copper spots.  It's just toning.

The SS Central America coins show little of this.  Reaction at
a depth of 8000 feet where water temperature is 34F is very slow.
The principal damage to shipwreck gold is a sandblast effect caused
by water current friction.  Such coins would not be graded MS.
These were not exposed to such currents.
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S.S. Central America show on History channel

Post by John Much » Sat, 16 Dec 2000 02:52:33


Thanks for the info.  I believe I may have gotten my shipwrecks mixed
up.  :-)

I just recently saw three 1857-S double eagles from the  S.S. Central
America in a Stack's Rare Cins auction lot viewing.  Though I did not
look closely, at a glance they appeared to be in great condition.
PCGS agreed, giving them MS66 and 67 grades.

I've already forgotten.  Which wreck was it that caused all of the
concern over "cleaning" because they had to get the coins out of a lot
of encrustation that built up over the years?  *Those* are the coins I
can't accept as still being MS.

If it's the S.S. Central America then I need to look at  those coins
again, very carefully, through a 10x loupe.  If I can't see *any*
indication of them being underwater, i.e., corrosion, etc., then I
need to change my tune and accept that these coins are still MS.

Uncirculated, no....Mint State, yes.  :-)

John Muchow

Quote:
>>The SS Central America coins show little of this.  Reaction at
>>a depth of 8000 feet where water temperature is 34F is very slow.
>>The principal damage to shipwreck gold is a sandblast effect caused
>>by water current friction.  Such coins would not be graded MS.
>>These were not exposed to such currents.