A Look at 45 Years Ago

A Look at 45 Years Ago

Post by Bruce Remic » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 04:25:40



I just ran across my old copy of Yeoman's "Blue Book" from 1958 and
thought I'd share a few examples of what dealers were paying in 1958.

1793 Chain Cent AMERICA  $70.00 in Fine
(the only grades listed are VG and Fine)
        Liberty Cap  $110.00 in Fine
1799 large cent  $75.00 in Fine
1804    "  $55.00 in Fine
1856 Flying Eagle proof $300.00
1877 Indian cent  $19.00 in Fine
1909-SVDB  $17.50 in Fine  (I'll take two, please)
1922 no D  $1.50 in Fine (I'll take a roll, please)
1937-D three-leg nickel  $3.00 in Fine
1894-S Barber dime  $300.00 in Fine
1916-D Mercury dime  $27.50 in Fine
1916 SLQ  $45.00 in Fine
1932-D/S in VF  $2.50/$1.75
1794 half dollar  $45.00 in Fine
Isabella commem quarter  $17.50 in UNC
1794 bust dollar  $425.00 in Fine
1895 Morgan  $80.00 in UNC
1893-S Morgan  $75.00 in UNC
1903-O Morgan  $85.00 in UNC
$3 gold  $25.00 in EF (highest grade listed)
$5 gold Indian- common dates  $8.50 in EF
$10 gold Indian- common dates $17.50 in EF
$20 gold St. G- common dates  $36.00 in EF

I had already been collecting for five years in 1958, and had a part
time job.  But none of these coins, except maybe for the Lincolns, were
even on my radar at the time.  Now I know where Ira goes to pick up some
of those goodies of his.

Bruce

 
 
 

A Look at 45 Years Ago

Post by Bob M » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 04:55:50


If you convert those prices to 2002 based on what the inflation rate has
been since 1958,  the prices would be:

1793 Chain Cent AMERICA  $441.09 in Fine
Liberty Cap  $693.14 in Fine
1799 large cent  $472.60 in Fine
1804       "           $346.57in Fine
1856 Flying Eagle proof $1890.39
1877 Indian cent  $119.72in Fine
1909-SVDB  $110.27in Fine
1922 no D  $9.45 in Fine
1937-D three-leg nickel  $18.90 in Fine
1894-S Barber dime  $1890.39 in Fine
1916-D Mercury dime  $173.29 in Fine
1916 SLQ  $283.56 in Fine
1932-D/S in VF  $15.75/$11.03
1794 half dollar  $283.56 in Fine
Isabella commem quarter  $110.27 in UNC
1794 bust dollar  $2678.05 in Fine
1895 Morgan  $504.10 in UNC
1893-S Morgan  $472.60 in UNC
1903-O Morgan  $535.61 in UNC
$3 gold  $157.53 in EF (highest grade listed)
$5 gold Indian- common dates  $53.56 in EF
$10 gold Indian- common dates $110.27 in EF
$20 gold St. G- common dates  $226.85 in EF

Still many good prices.
******************************


Quote:
> I just ran across my old copy of Yeoman's "Blue Book" from 1958 and
> thought I'd share a few examples of what dealers were paying in 1958.

> 1793 Chain Cent AMERICA  $70.00 in Fine
> (the only grades listed are VG and Fine)
> Liberty Cap  $110.00 in Fine
> 1799 large cent  $75.00 in Fine
> 1804 " $55.00 in Fine
> 1856 Flying Eagle proof $300.00
> 1877 Indian cent  $19.00 in Fine
> 1909-SVDB  $17.50 in Fine  (I'll take two, please)
> 1922 no D  $1.50 in Fine (I'll take a roll, please)
> 1937-D three-leg nickel  $3.00 in Fine
> 1894-S Barber dime  $300.00 in Fine
> 1916-D Mercury dime  $27.50 in Fine
> 1916 SLQ  $45.00 in Fine
> 1932-D/S in VF  $2.50/$1.75
> 1794 half dollar  $45.00 in Fine
> Isabella commem quarter  $17.50 in UNC
> 1794 bust dollar  $425.00 in Fine
> 1895 Morgan  $80.00 in UNC
> 1893-S Morgan  $75.00 in UNC
> 1903-O Morgan  $85.00 in UNC
> $3 gold  $25.00 in EF (highest grade listed)
> $5 gold Indian- common dates  $8.50 in EF
> $10 gold Indian- common dates $17.50 in EF
> $20 gold St. G- common dates  $36.00 in EF

> I had already been collecting for five years in 1958, and had a part
> time job.  But none of these coins, except maybe for the Lincolns, were
> even on my radar at the time.  Now I know where Ira goes to pick up some
> of those goodies of his.

> Bruce


 
 
 

A Look at 45 Years Ago

Post by Harv Lase » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 05:34:52



Quote:
> If you convert those prices to 2002 based on what the inflation rate has
> been since 1958,  the prices would be:

Sure, but the average American yearly income was about $5000.00..

Take a look at this::

http://www.fiftiesweb.com/pop/prices-1959.htm

or this one::

http://www.tvhistory.tv/1958%20QF.htm

It's all relative and you have to put it all in perspective.. most stuff
today, with some obvious exceptions such as consumer electronics or a gallon
of milk, or gasoline (although it's getting there) costs ten times what it
did in 1958 in terms of raw dollars.. not everything, but most things..
however lots of other things are a fraction of what they used to cost.

And as everyone knows, many things we take for granted today (ATMs, VCRs,
CDs, DVDs, GPS, touch-tone dialing, cell phones, the list is endless) didn't
even exist in 1958. Buy a telephone? Hah. No such thing in 1958. You moved
into a new place, the phone company came out, hardwired the lines, and gave
you a phone or two. Phones made so well they didn't break. Didn't need
batteries. Weighed a ton. Color TeeVee? Very primitive and very expensive.
Most families in 1958 didn't own one. Transistor pocket radios? Wow! What an
exciting new invention but "Made in Japan" in 1958 meant "crap." So your
transistor radio was made in the USA by G.E. or Zenith or Westinghouse..

Anyway..

If the average schmoo coin collector making $1.00 an hour minimum wage
wanted to buy a 1909-SVDB in fine figuring an eight hour work day paying him
$8.00 a day would've cost him two full days pay and then some to get one. An
EF Saint, a week's paycheck. You could treat a family of four out to a nice
restaurant for dinner and pay for it with a $10.00 bill and get change.
These days, one person chowing down at a salad bar pays that much.. So the
schmoos filled their Whitman books with what they could find in change, and
those with bigger incomes could buy the keys because they knew their family
wouldn't starve if they did..

As a kid in 1958 I felt rich if I had a half dollar in my pocket, or a two
digit balance in my savings book..

Harv

 
 
 

A Look at 45 Years Ago

Post by John Carne » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 06:08:49


Quote:

> If you convert those prices to 2002 based on what the inflation rate has
> been since 1958,  the prices would be:

> 1793 Chain Cent AMERICA  $441.09 in Fine
> Liberty Cap  $693.14 in Fine
> 1799 large cent  $472.60 in Fine
> 1804       "           $346.57in Fine
> 1856 Flying Eagle proof $1890.39
> 1877 Indian cent  $119.72in Fine
> 1909-SVDB  $110.27in Fine
> 1922 no D  $9.45 in Fine
> 1937-D three-leg nickel  $18.90 in Fine
> 1894-S Barber dime  $1890.39 in Fine
> 1916-D Mercury dime  $173.29 in Fine
> 1916 SLQ  $283.56 in Fine
> 1932-D/S in VF  $15.75/$11.03
> 1794 half dollar  $283.56 in Fine
> Isabella commem quarter  $110.27 in UNC
> 1794 bust dollar  $2678.05 in Fine
> 1895 Morgan  $504.10 in UNC
> 1893-S Morgan  $472.60 in UNC
> 1903-O Morgan  $535.61 in UNC
> $3 gold  $157.53 in EF (highest grade listed)
> $5 gold Indian- common dates  $53.56 in EF
> $10 gold Indian- common dates $110.27 in EF
> $20 gold St. G- common dates  $226.85 in EF

Then that says key date coins for the most part beat inflation handily for 45 years. Not a
bad investment, contrary to what a lot of people will say. So why do a lot of people say
coins aren't a good investment? Makes one wonder......

--
John

Visit the RCCers favorite coins web page
http://mywebpages.comcast.net/jcarney44/coins/rccers.html

 
 
 

A Look at 45 Years Ago

Post by Dale Hallmar » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 06:19:14



Quote:
> Then that says key date coins for the most part beat inflation handily for 45
years. Not a
> bad investment, contrary to what a lot of people will say. So why do a lot of
people say
> coins aren't a good investment? Makes one wonder......

If we only collected the keys then coins probably is a good investment.
I have a lot of coins but no keys :-)

Dale>

 
 
 

A Look at 45 Years Ago

Post by Chris » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 06:13:16


And the comparable value of an investment that appreciated like the Dow
Jones Industrial Average is shown below. This favors coins somewhat, in that
stocks have lower storage, etc. costs, but I think it illustrates the point
that decent-grade keys are investment-grade coins.

1793 Chain Cent AMERICA  $1,340 in Fine
Liberty Cap  $2,106 in Fine
1799 large cent  $1,436 in Fine
1804       "           $1,053 in Fine
1856 Flying Eagle proof $5,744
1877 Indian cent  $364 in Fine
1909-SVDB  $335 in Fine
1922 no D  $29 in Fine
1937-D three-leg nickel  $57 in Fine
1894-S Barber dime  $5,744 in Fine
1916-D Mercury dime  $526 in Fine
1916 SLQ  $862 in Fine
1932-D/S in VF  $48/$34
1794 half dollar  $862 in Fine
Isabella commem quarter  $335 in UNC
1794 bust dollar  $8,137 in Fine
1895 Morgan  $1,532 in UNC
1893-S Morgan  $1,436 in UNC
1903-O Morgan  $1,627 in UNC
$3 gold  $479 in EF (highest grade listed)
$5 gold Indian- common dates  $163 in EF
$10 gold Indian- common dates $335 in EF
$20 gold St. G- common dates  $689 in EF

The only losers among the group seem to be the listings with the word
"common" in them.
--Chris

Quote:

> If you convert those prices to 2002 based on what the inflation rate has
> been since 1958,  the prices would be:

> 1793 Chain Cent AMERICA  $441.09 in Fine
> Liberty Cap  $693.14 in Fine
> 1799 large cent  $472.60 in Fine
> 1804       "           $346.57in Fine
> 1856 Flying Eagle proof $1890.39
> 1877 Indian cent  $119.72in Fine
> 1909-SVDB  $110.27in Fine
> 1922 no D  $9.45 in Fine
> 1937-D three-leg nickel  $18.90 in Fine
> 1894-S Barber dime  $1890.39 in Fine
> 1916-D Mercury dime  $173.29 in Fine
> 1916 SLQ  $283.56 in Fine
> 1932-D/S in VF  $15.75/$11.03
> 1794 half dollar  $283.56 in Fine
> Isabella commem quarter  $110.27 in UNC
> 1794 bust dollar  $2678.05 in Fine
> 1895 Morgan  $504.10 in UNC
> 1893-S Morgan  $472.60 in UNC
> 1903-O Morgan  $535.61 in UNC
> $3 gold  $157.53 in EF (highest grade listed)
> $5 gold Indian- common dates  $53.56 in EF
> $10 gold Indian- common dates $110.27 in EF
> $20 gold St. G- common dates  $226.85 in EF

> Still many good prices.
> ******************************



> > I just ran across my old copy of Yeoman's "Blue Book" from 1958 and
> > thought I'd share a few examples of what dealers were paying in 1958.

> > 1793 Chain Cent AMERICA  $70.00 in Fine
> > (the only grades listed are VG and Fine)
> > Liberty Cap  $110.00 in Fine
> > 1799 large cent  $75.00 in Fine
> > 1804 " $55.00 in Fine
> > 1856 Flying Eagle proof $300.00
> > 1877 Indian cent  $19.00 in Fine
> > 1909-SVDB  $17.50 in Fine  (I'll take two, please)
> > 1922 no D  $1.50 in Fine (I'll take a roll, please)
> > 1937-D three-leg nickel  $3.00 in Fine
> > 1894-S Barber dime  $300.00 in Fine
> > 1916-D Mercury dime  $27.50 in Fine
> > 1916 SLQ  $45.00 in Fine
> > 1932-D/S in VF  $2.50/$1.75
> > 1794 half dollar  $45.00 in Fine
> > Isabella commem quarter  $17.50 in UNC
> > 1794 bust dollar  $425.00 in Fine
> > 1895 Morgan  $80.00 in UNC
> > 1893-S Morgan  $75.00 in UNC
> > 1903-O Morgan  $85.00 in UNC
> > $3 gold  $25.00 in EF (highest grade listed)
> > $5 gold Indian- common dates  $8.50 in EF
> > $10 gold Indian- common dates $17.50 in EF
> > $20 gold St. G- common dates  $36.00 in EF

> > I had already been collecting for five years in 1958, and had a part
> > time job.  But none of these coins, except maybe for the Lincolns, were
> > even on my radar at the time.  Now I know where Ira goes to pick up some
> > of those goodies of his.

> > Bruce

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A Look at 45 Years Ago

Post by Stujo » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 09:46:27



spoke thusly...

Quote:
> Then that says key date coins for the most part beat inflation handily for 45 years. Not a
> bad investment, contrary to what a lot of people will say. So why do a lot of people say
> coins aren't a good investment? Makes one wonder......

1. Because non-coin people still have to know what they are doing in
a lot of areas besides just picking a date and mint mark...there's
grading, authentication, damage, the right price guide, the right
slab or the right dealer, etc, etc.

2. The non-coin people usually asking about investing have little to
no coin knowledge and often are probably not willing to work at
getting it.

3. The non-coin people asking about investing often seem to me to be
thinking more along the lines of day-trading than investing.

If someone has the money and knows what they are doing, it is
probably a much different playing field.

--
Stu Miller
ICQ:159336182 AIM:stujoe Yahoo:stujoe
See the new exhibits in the Virtual Museum at:
http://www.thestujoecollection.com/museum/1900room.htm

 
 
 

A Look at 45 Years Ago

Post by Chris » Sun, 19 Jan 2003 09:28:23


John:
Take a look at the exchanges between Bob Peterson and me in the thread,
"Gold coin advice" on Jan 15. That boils down to a similar point as this
thread, namely, that investors should differentiate between collector-grade
coins, investment-grade coins, and bullion. These segments are analogous to
junk bonds, blue-chip stocks, and commodities.
--Chris

Quote:

> Then that says key date coins for the most part beat inflation handily for
45 years. Not a
> bad investment, contrary to what a lot of people will say. So why do a lot
of people say
> coins aren't a good investment? Makes one wonder......

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A Look at 45 Years Ago

Post by LDRS HBBY NU » Mon, 20 Jan 2003 10:30:13


<< I just ran across my old copy of Yeoman's "Blue Book" from 1958 and
thought I'd share a few examples of what dealers were paying in 1958. >>

Boy, that brought me back! When I was in college in the early 1970's I used to
attend a regular estate auction where I purchased coins. There was an old guy
who not only worked for the auction house, but lived upstairs. He noticed that
I was interested in coins and invited me to buy some coins that he had
upstairs. Besides seeing all the neat stuff up there (a barrel full of violins,
hundreds of octagonal barrel rifles, tons of grandfather clocks etc) he also
had quite a large number of coins. Anything I was interested in could be
purchased at 1/2 the 1958 bluebook price! Wish I wasn't a starving college
student at the time. Most of what I bought from this old gent were G-VG large
cents, at about $2-$5 each. Wish I could have bought more at the time.