Interesting discussion of 1065-1080 Norse coin found in North America

Interesting discussion of 1065-1080 Norse coin found in North America

Post by stone » Sat, 10 Sep 2005 05:11:59



In the sci.archaeology newsgroup.

If interested check it out.

http://groups.google.com/group/sci.archaeology/browse_frm/thread/7bbd...

Hope that link works.

 
 
 

Interesting discussion of 1065-1080 Norse coin found in North America

Post by Jorg Luek » Sun, 11 Sep 2005 00:01:45


The same arguments go back and forth on Roman coins found in the new
world.  There was just a discussion in Coinpeople.

I don't think it's terribly relevant whether soem ancient explorers or
shipwrecks made it to the new world.  It certainly seems plausible that
Chinese, Romans, Carthiginians, Romans,and Vikings could have landed.
But, none of them had any lasting impact.

It is interesting trivia but trivial science.

Free US Coin Prices http://www.coinvalues.us/12.html
Free Ancient Coin Information and Prices
http://www.ancientcoinvalues.com

 
 
 

Interesting discussion of 1065-1080 Norse coin found in North America

Post by stone » Sun, 11 Sep 2005 00:15:42


Perhaps, it is trivial in a way but it just depends
on how you approach a subject.  Consequences
could have been huge if the Vikings landing in
North America had became wide knowledge
and started a mass migration of people from
Europe 500 years before Columbus.
 
 
 

Interesting discussion of 1065-1080 Norse coin found in North America

Post by PC » Sun, 11 Sep 2005 00:21:30



Quote:
> Perhaps, it is trivial in a way but it just depends
> on how you approach a subject.  Consequences
> could have been huge if the Vikings landing in
> North America had became wide knowledge
> and started a mass migration of people from
> Europe 500 years before Columbus.

Yes the entire makeup of borders and countries in this hemisphere would
likely be very different.  World politics would most definitely not be the
same.
 
 
 

Interesting discussion of 1065-1080 Norse coin found in North America

Post by Jorg Luek » Sun, 11 Sep 2005 03:14:22


Right, the key to your statement though is "IF".
Since it did not happen, it is interesting, but of no great
socio-historical import.

If you get inot historicla speculation about what could have happened a
lot of interesting possibilities arise.  Would a Confederate States of
America have joined with the United States to take on the Kaiser or
Hitler?

Jorg Lueke
Free US Coin Prices http://www.coinvalues.us/12.html
Free Ancient Coin Information and Prices
http://www.ancientcoinvalues.com

 
 
 

Interesting discussion of 1065-1080 Norse coin found in North America

Post by stone » Sun, 11 Sep 2005 04:56:10


There is nothing wrong with looking at "if" in
various historical contexts.  A good question
might be why something turned into an "if".

Just think if William Sheldon had not invented
the mint state grading system, would we now
have slabs?

:)

 
 
 

Interesting discussion of 1065-1080 Norse coin found in North America

Post by Jorg Luek » Sun, 11 Sep 2005 05:39:24


I'm not saying there's anything wrong with it.  I think trivial usually
has negative connotations though I implied none.
 
 
 

Interesting discussion of 1065-1080 Norse coin found in North America

Post by note.bo » Sun, 11 Sep 2005 23:22:23


Quote:

> Right, the key to your statement though is "IF".
> Since it did not happen, it is interesting, but of no great
> socio-historical import.

> If you get inot historicla speculation about what could have happened a
> lot of interesting possibilities arise.  Would a Confederate States of
> America have joined with the United States to take on the Kaiser or
> Hitler?

> Jorg Lueke
> Free US Coin Prices http://www.coinvalues.us/12.html
> Free Ancient Coin Information and Prices
> http://www.ancientcoinvalues.com

There's a book called "What If?" that considers military turning points
over the last 3,000 years and considers the consequences if the battles has
ended the other way round.

It's an interesting read.  Billy