New Quarter Question

New Quarter Question

Post by rule » Fri, 25 Jun 1999 04:00:00



I've got a Pennsylvania quarter where the *1* in *1999* and the *Pluribus*
didn't come out at all

Comments?

--
Rick Stanziale
copyright 1999 all rights reserved
http://www.negia.net/~rule

 
 
 

New Quarter Question

Post by Alan Herber » Fri, 25 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
> I've got a Pennsylvania quarter where the *1* in *1999* and the *Pluribus*
> didn't come out at all

===========
Hi Rick:

The probable cause is a filled die - dirt and grease packed into the design
elements, preventing the coin metal from entering them during the strike.

To have collector value, your coin must meet two criteria. First it must be
uncirculated (MS-60 or higher) grade. Second, none of the missing design
element can be visible under 10X magnification. If your coin meets these two
criteria, then it's worth $5 to $10.

Alan Herbert - Contributing Editor - Numismatic News

 
 
 

New Quarter Question

Post by Sarept » Fri, 25 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Newbie here again...so am I using too high a powered magnification?  I use a
20x.  Thanks


|
| > I've got a Pennsylvania quarter where the *1* in *1999* and the
*Pluribus*
| > didn't come out at all
| ===========
| Hi Rick:
|
| The probable cause is a filled die - dirt and grease packed into the
design
| elements, preventing the coin metal from entering them during the strike.
|
| To have collector value, your coin must meet two criteria. First it must
be
| uncirculated (MS-60 or higher) grade. Second, none of the missing design
| element can be visible under 10X magnification. If your coin meets these
two
| criteria, then it's worth $5 to $10.
|
| Alan Herbert - Contributing Editor - Numismatic News
|
|

 
 
 

New Quarter Question

Post by Alan Herber » Sat, 26 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
> Newbie here again...so am I using too high a powered magnification?  I use
a
> 20x.  Thanks

===========
A 20X is pretty strong for a beginner. My general recommendation is to use a
5 to 10 X lens for bulk coin exams, moving up to a 15X for detailed
examinations and a 20-40X microscope for minting varieties or authentication
work. Until you have a lot of experience a 20X or stronger is really going
to show you "too much."  For example, you will find a lot of doubling with
your 20X that you can't see with a 10X which is pretty much the standard
magnification for minting varieties. Doubling that you see at 20X but not at
10X is not usually of interest to minting variety collectors.
Alan Herbert - Contributing Editor - Numismatic News
 
 
 

New Quarter Question

Post by Sarept » Sat, 26 Jun 1999 04:00:00


I love it when I learn something new here!  Thanks.
Sarepta


|
| > Newbie here again...so am I using too high a powered magnification?  I
use
| a
| > 20x.  Thanks
| ===========
| A 20X is pretty strong for a beginner. My general recommendation is to use
a
| 5 to 10 X lens for bulk coin exams, moving up to a 15X for detailed
| examinations and a 20-40X microscope for minting varieties or
authentication
| work. Until you have a lot of experience a 20X or stronger is really going
| to show you "too much."  For example, you will find a lot of doubling with
| your 20X that you can't see with a 10X which is pretty much the standard
| magnification for minting varieties. Doubling that you see at 20X but not
at
| 10X is not usually of interest to minting variety collectors.
| Alan Herbert - Contributing Editor - Numismatic News
|
|
|

 
 
 

New Quarter Question

Post by Chris Redd » Sun, 27 Jun 1999 04:00:00


I agree.  Thanks for that helpful tip, Alan.

Quote:

> I love it when I learn something new here!  Thanks.
> Sarepta



> |
> | > Newbie here again...so am I using too high a powered magnification?  I
> use
> | a
> | > 20x.  Thanks
> | ===========
> | A 20X is pretty strong for a beginner. My general recommendation is to use
> a
> | 5 to 10 X lens for bulk coin exams, moving up to a 15X for detailed
> | examinations and a 20-40X microscope for minting varieties or
> authentication
> | work. Until you have a lot of experience a 20X or stronger is really going
> | to show you "too much."  For example, you will find a lot of doubling with
> | your 20X that you can't see with a 10X which is pretty much the standard
> | magnification for minting varieties. Doubling that you see at 20X but not
> at
> | 10X is not usually of interest to minting variety collectors.
> | Alan Herbert - Contributing Editor - Numismatic News
> |
> |
> |