Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by stone » Fri, 30 Nov 2007 10:17:39



http://www.nbcaugusta.com/news/strange/11852036.html
 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Jon Purke » Fri, 30 Nov 2007 12:27:52


On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 17:17:39 -0800 (PST), stonej

Quote:

>http://www.nbcaugusta.com/news/strange/11852036.html
> Officers say Smith also purchased several cartons of cigarettes with
> a stolen check over the weekend.

That probably had more to do with him landing in jail than the fake
(probably novelty) $1M bill.

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Padraic Brow » Sat, 01 Dec 2007 09:50:40


On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 03:27:52 GMT, Jon Purkey

Quote:

>On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 17:17:39 -0800 (PST), stonej

>>http://www.nbcaugusta.com/news/strange/11852036.html

>> Officers say Smith also purchased several cartons of cigarettes with
>> a stolen check over the weekend.

>That probably had more to do with him landing in jail than the fake
>(probably novelty) $1M bill.

Since there are no real (US) $1M, there can't be a such thing as a
"fake" or "counterfeit" one! I've often wondered at how it is these
goofballs can prosecute someone for trying to barter goods for a
novelty $1M! :S

Padraic

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by RF » Sat, 01 Dec 2007 10:37:54



Quote:
> On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 03:27:52 GMT, Jon Purkey


> >On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 17:17:39 -0800 (PST), stonej

> >>http://www.FoundCollection.com/

> >> Officers say Smith also purchased several cartons of cigarettes with
> >> a stolen check over the weekend.

> >That probably had more to do with him landing in jail than the fake
> >(probably novelty) $1M bill.

> Since there are no real (US) $1M, there can't be a such thing as a
> "fake" or "counterfeit" one! I've often wondered at how it is these
> goofballs can prosecute someone for trying to barter goods for a
> novelty $1M! :S

> Padraic

> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account fromhttp://www.FoundCollection.com/

In United States law, uttering and publishing is a crime similar to
counterfeiting. Uttering is the act of offering a forged document to
another when the offerer has knowledge that the document is forged.1
Uttering does not require that the person who presented the document
actually forged or altered the document. For example, forging a log
for personal profit might be considered uttering and publishing.
Another example would be the forging of a university diploma. As an
example of the law itself, the State of Michigan defines the offense
(MCL 750.249): "Any person who utters and publishes as true any false,
forged, altered or counterfeit record, deed, instrument or other
writing specified, knowing it to be false, altered, forged, or
counterfeit, with intent to injure or defraud is guilty of uttering
and publishing."[1]

Forging or illegal 'publishing' of an official or unofficial document
is not the essence of uttering. Uttering is the actual presentation of
forged or official documentation as one's own. So, for example, an
*** *** attempting to get into a bar with an ID that is either
fake or not theirs is guilty of uttering, though they may have had
nothing to do with the actual making, or 'publishing' of the ID.

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by rwalke » Sun, 02 Dec 2007 13:27:35



snip

Quote:

> Since there are no real (US) $1M, there can't be a such thing as a
> "fake" or "counterfeit" one! I've often wondered at how it is these
> goofballs can prosecute someone for trying to barter goods for a
> novelty $1M! :S

> Padraic

Seems to me that it would constitute fraud, which is still illegal.
 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Padraic Brow » Mon, 03 Dec 2007 04:16:32




Quote:



>snip

>> Since there are no real (US) $1M, there can't be a such thing as a
>> "fake" or "counterfeit" one! I've often wondered at how it is these
>> goofballs can prosecute someone for trying to barter goods for a
>> novelty $1M! :S

>> Padraic

>Seems to me that it would constitute fraud, which is still illegal.

Where's the fraud? There's no such thing as a million dollar bill, so
there's no possiblity of defrauding the merchant by offering a fake
one. There is no rule or law against trading or bartering goods with a
medium other than US$ -- if both sides agree to the terms then all is
copacetic. The guy offered a piece of paper consisting of a novelty
banknote-like object -- a fantasy note. Obviously, one side did not
agree with the terms of the deal. All that needs to be done is for the
merchant to say "I'm sorry, but there's no such thing as a million
dollar bill, so we can't accept that here. You need to use standard US
cash or a valid credit or debit card." End of story. What happened was
simply overkill.

Padraic

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Mr. Jagger » Mon, 03 Dec 2007 04:28:30



Quote:




>>snip

>>> Since there are no real (US) $1M, there can't be a such thing as a
>>> "fake" or "counterfeit" one! I've often wondered at how it is these
>>> goofballs can prosecute someone for trying to barter goods for a
>>> novelty $1M! :S

>>> Padraic

>>Seems to me that it would constitute fraud, which is still illegal.

> Where's the fraud? There's no such thing as a million dollar bill, so
> there's no possiblity of defrauding the merchant by offering a fake
> one. There is no rule or law against trading or bartering goods with a
> medium other than US$ -- if both sides agree to the terms then all is
> copacetic. The guy offered a piece of paper consisting of a novelty
> banknote-like object -- a fantasy note. Obviously, one side did not
> agree with the terms of the deal. All that needs to be done is for the
> merchant to say "I'm sorry, but there's no such thing as a million
> dollar bill, so we can't accept that here. You need to use standard US
> cash or a valid credit or debit card." End of story. What happened was
> simply overkill.

It's another facet of the macho "zero tolerance" movement that has swept our
country.  Stomping down the insignificant gives a big power fix.

James

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Jeff R » Mon, 03 Dec 2007 07:28:56



<...>

Quote:
> if both sides agree to the terms then all is
> copacetic.

John Cleese was right. You Americans *don't* speak English.
Another word for the list.

--
Jeff R.

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Mr. Jagger » Mon, 03 Dec 2007 08:30:57



Quote:



> <...>
>> if both sides agree to the terms then all is
>> copacetic.

> John Cleese was right. You Americans *don't* speak English.
> Another word for the list.

What list?  The word has been around a long time.

http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=copacetic

http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-cop1.htm

and

http://homepage.mac.com/bem/CopaceticDefinition.html

James

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Jeff R » Mon, 03 Dec 2007 09:58:04



Quote:





>> <...>
>>> if both sides agree to the terms then all is
>>> copacetic.

>> John Cleese was right. You Americans *don't* speak English.
>> Another word for the list.

> What list?  The word has been around a long time.

> http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=copacetic

> http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-cop1.htm

> and

> http://homepage.mac.com/bem/CopaceticDefinition.html

> James

Mirriam Webster?  Who's she?
Link 2 admits its a weird word.
Link 3 acknowledges it is slang, then quotes the OED (!)

Well, my 1933 Shorter OED doesn't have it, so I class it as US-centric, and
hence, eccentric.

The list I'm referring to is words which Yanks (N&S) use but no-one else in
the world does. (Like: "glomworthy")

Not a criticism - an observation.  I find it interesting, not belittling.

We certainly are divided by a common language.

--
Jeff R.
~151E  33.5S

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Mr. Jagger » Mon, 03 Dec 2007 10:59:27



Quote:







>>> <...>
>>>> if both sides agree to the terms then all is
>>>> copacetic.

>>> John Cleese was right. You Americans *don't* speak English.
>>> Another word for the list.

>> What list?  The word has been around a long time.

>> http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=copacetic

>> http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-cop1.htm

>> and

>> http://homepage.mac.com/bem/CopaceticDefinition.html

>> James

> Mirriam Webster?  Who's she?

It is a hyphenation of the names Mirriam and Webster, two pioneers in the
history of dictionary writing.

Quote:
> Link 2 admits its a weird word.

As are so many words weird.  Billabong, for example.  8>)

Quote:
> Link 3 acknowledges it is slang, then quotes the OED (!)

C'est la vie, c,est la guerre.

Quote:
> Well, my 1933 Shorter OED doesn't have it, so I class it as US-centric,
> and hence, eccentric.

The word didn't really enjoy ascendency until the 1960s, so no surprise that
your 1933 dictionary, especially the "shorter" version, didn't include it.

Quote:
> The list I'm referring to is words which Yanks (N&S) use but no-one else
> in the world does. (Like: "glomworthy")

We are likely guilty as charged.

Quote:
> Not a criticism - an observation.  I find it interesting, not belittling.

Likewise do I.

Quote:
> We certainly are divided by a common language.

And let it remain so, as it makes life interesting.

James

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Phil DeMay » Mon, 03 Dec 2007 12:02:18



Quote:
> The list I'm referring to is words which Yanks (N&S) use but no-one else in
> the world does. (Like: "glomworthy")

Objection your Honor....the attorney for the prosecution is well aware
that there is only one person in the world that uses that word.

The fact that the person is a Yank, although a source of national
shame, is an unfair example

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Jeff R » Mon, 03 Dec 2007 13:21:27




Quote:
> The list I'm referring to is words which Yanks (N&S) use but no-one else
> in
> the world does. (Like: "glomworthy")

Objection your Honor....the attorney for the prosecution is well aware
that there is only one person in the world that uses that word.

The fact that the person is a Yank, although a source of national
shame, is an unfair example
=================================

Yes, I admit, that was below the belt.
I am such a bozo at times...

--
Jeff R.

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Jeff R » Mon, 03 Dec 2007 13:33:29



Quote:

>> Mirriam Webster?  Who's she?

> It is a hyphenation of the names Mirriam and Webster, two pioneers in the
> history of dictionary writing.

*American* dictionary writing - not English.

Quote:

>> Link 2 admits its a weird word.

> As are so many words weird.  Billabong, for example.  8>)

Ooh ooh! He hits below the belt, I mean "equator".
Most of us would acknowledge that billabong is not an English word, 'though
we use it.

Quote:

>> Link 3 acknowledges it is slang, then quotes the OED (!)

> C'est la vie, c,est la guerre.

Hey! No fair!
I'm discussing AmeroEnglish!
Cesser et de s'abstenir avec le fran?ais

Quote:
> The word didn't really enjoy ascendency until the 1960s,

Really!?
Its that young?

Quote:
>...so no surprise that your 1933 dictionary, especially the "shorter"
>version, didn't include it.

Hehe.
You do know that the adjective "Shorter" is a euphemism, when referring to
the OED.
I'm talking twenty pounds of fine text.

Quote:
>> The list I'm referring to is words which Yanks (N&S) use but no-one else
>> in the world does. (Like: "glomworthy")

> We are likely guilty as charged.

Well - *some* of us.
(Thanks Phil.)

Quote:

>> Not a criticism - an observation.  I find it interesting, not belittling.

> Likewise do I.

>> We certainly are divided by a common language.

> And let it remain so, as it makes life interesting.

> James

Yer darn tootin' it does.

--
Jeff R.

 
 
 

Fake $1 million bill lands man in jail

Post by Honu » Mon, 03 Dec 2007 03:44:42



Quote:



> >> Mirriam Webster?  Who's she?

> > It is a hyphenation of the names Mirriam and Webster, two pioneers in
the
> > history of dictionary writing.

> *American* dictionary writing - not English.

> >> Link 2 admits its a weird word.

> > As are so many words weird.  Billabong, for example.  8>)

> Ooh ooh! He hits below the belt, I mean "equator".
> Most of us would acknowledge that billabong is not an English word,
'though
> we use it.

This all reminds me of a quote:

"The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that
English is about as pure as a cribhouse ***. We don't just borrow words;
on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them
unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary."

James Nicoll

Who, on his web page bio, states that "I was born in Canada, learned English
in the UK, learned English again in Canada...."

FWIW. ;)