To Slab or Not To slab?

To Slab or Not To slab?

Post by Dai L » Tue, 11 Feb 2003 02:02:08



First, thanks to all for the wonderful reading.  I hope that from your
collective knowledge I can raise my self above the level of "bidiot".
Your opinions saved me from buying some A*G graded Silver Eagles just
recently.

For the benefit of my 13 mo. old son, I an trying to fill my long ago
abandoned coin sets and put together some 50 state quarter
collections, etc.

My Father recently passed on to me a collection of coins from himself
and my Grandfather.

Among the coins in the collection are:
1827 Capped Bust half dollar, Overton # Unknown, and based on photo
comparison, EF-40 or slightly better condition,
1926 Oregon Trail Commemorative,
1925 Stone Mountain Commem.,
1936 Long Island commem.,
1936 San Diego Commem.
1925 California Diamond Jubilee
1893 Columbian Exposition Commem. half.

A couple of these apear (in my layman's eye) appear to be near
uncirculated and original condition. (Another Layman's term)

I have looked at some of the auctions and valuations of these coins.
In order to preserve/increase whatever value there is in these coins,
are these worth sending out for grading?  I was most concerned about
the 1827 half being counterfeit, but then I remembered that my Grandpa
worked in a bank in the early 20's.

Opinions from those more learned and experiences than me are
appreciated.  Photos can be provided for the curious.

 
 
 

To Slab or Not To slab?

Post by Bill Krumme » Tue, 11 Feb 2003 02:30:54



Quote:
> First, thanks to all for the wonderful reading.  I hope that from your
> collective knowledge I can raise my self above the level of "bidiot".
> Your opinions saved me from buying some A*G graded Silver Eagles just
> recently.

> For the benefit of my 13 mo. old son, I an trying to fill my long ago
> abandoned coin sets and put together some 50 state quarter
> collections, etc.

> My Father recently passed on to me a collection of coins from himself
> and my Grandfather.

> Among the coins in the collection are:
> 1827 Capped Bust half dollar, Overton # Unknown, and based on photo
> comparison, EF-40 or slightly better condition,
> 1926 Oregon Trail Commemorative,
> 1925 Stone Mountain Commem.,
> 1936 Long Island commem.,
> 1936 San Diego Commem.
> 1925 California Diamond Jubilee
> 1893 Columbian Exposition Commem. half.

> A couple of these apear (in my layman's eye) appear to be near
> uncirculated and original condition. (Another Layman's term)

> I have looked at some of the auctions and valuations of these coins.
> In order to preserve/increase whatever value there is in these coins,
> are these worth sending out for grading?  I was most concerned about
> the 1827 half being counterfeit, but then I remembered that my Grandpa
> worked in a bank in the early 20's.

> Opinions from those more learned and experiences than me are
> appreciated.  Photos can be provided for the curious.

I won't say about the Bust half, but the other halfs, the classic
commemorative halfs, I wouldn't mind if you emailed some images.  I am on
dial up so it would be nice if the images were jpeg and no more than 100kb
each.  Also, if you send images, don't send more than a couple at a time.

Even with images, it may be a tough call as to whether to submit or not.
Some of the above have good price jumps between MS64 and MS65 grades.  If
they were graded 64 by a reputable grading service, you may not recover your
grading fee.  OTOH, if they are MS65s, you would likely not get 65 money for
them if you sell them raw.  I would not be able to predict what the services
would grade them by your images, heck I wouldn't have a strong guess if I
had them in my hand.  Here is one of mine that I thought would be a 65 and
it came back a 63;

http://showcase.netins.net/web/billsdqandcoins/1938OregonICG63.JPG

Another that came back AU58;

http://showcase.netins.net/web/billsdqandcoins/1925-SCalifornia.JPG

Another one that I purchased already in the plastic;

http://showcase.netins.net/web/billsdqandcoins/LongIslandPCGS63.JPG

I would have thought the Long Island as better than 63, except perhaps for
the one serious mark on the sail on the reverse.

Anyway, I could probably give you some idea whether obviously circulated or
not, a guess on the grade range, and price listings for the different grades
and an idea how much the cost would be to submit.   Bill

 
 
 

To Slab or Not To slab?

Post by WinWinscenar » Tue, 11 Feb 2003 02:53:01


Quote:
>In order to preserve/increase whatever value there is in these coins,
>are these worth sending out for grading?

If you want them fully marketable, i.e. easy to sell, then you are probably
better off having them graded and slabbed.

It's difficult to tell how many you have that are worth slabbing, but an easy
way to do it is to join the PCGS (or NGC) collector's club.  For $99 you get 4
free slabs, for $179 you get 8 free slabs, and then you pay the member rate for
subsequent submissions.  Most of the coins you describe would be much easier to
sell if they were encapsulated.  Whether the extra $20-$30 cost per coin would
be recoverable in increased selling costs is not guaranteed but is a good
gamble (and depends on condition).

 
 
 

To Slab or Not To slab?

Post by Eric Tiller » Tue, 11 Feb 2003 06:28:58



Quote:
>It's difficult to tell how many you have that are worth slabbing, but an easy
>way to do it is to join the PCGS (or NGC) collector's club.  For $99 you get 4
>free slabs, for $179 you get 8 free slabs, and then you pay the member rate for
>subsequent submissions.  Most of the coins you describe would be much easier to
>sell if they were encapsulated.  Whether the extra $20-$30 cost per coin would
>be recoverable in increased selling costs is not guaranteed but is a good
>gamble (and depends on condition).

A few things to note:

NGC offers only three free submissions when you sign up, but if you fill out your
submission form online, you get a 10% discount.

PCGS has recently changed their levels of service without proper notification.
Economy submissions are now taking up to 45 business days (nine weeks).
NGC's turnaround on economy is 21 business days.
 --
A Close look at Accugrade:

http://www.k6az.com/acg.htm

My Morgan Collection

http://www.k6az.com/morgan_collection.htm

How to tell the difference between Old and New PCI Holders

http://www.k6az.com/pci.htm

 
 
 

To Slab or Not To slab?

Post by Alan & Erin William » Tue, 11 Feb 2003 06:49:24


Quote:

> First, thanks to all for the wonderful reading.  I hope that from your
> collective knowledge I can raise my self above the level of "bidiot".
> Your opinions saved me from buying some A*G graded Silver Eagles just
> recently.

> For the benefit of my 13 mo. old son, I an trying to fill my long ago
> abandoned coin sets and put together some 50 state quarter
> collections, etc.

> My Father recently passed on to me a collection of coins from himself
> and my Grandfather.

> Among the coins in the collection are:
> 1827 Capped Bust half dollar, Overton # Unknown, and based on photo
> comparison, EF-40 or slightly better condition,
> 1926 Oregon Trail Commemorative,
> 1925 Stone Mountain Commem.,
> 1936 Long Island commem.,
> 1936 San Diego Commem.
> 1925 California Diamond Jubilee
> 1893 Columbian Exposition Commem. half.

> A couple of these apear (in my layman's eye) appear to be near
> uncirculated and original condition. (Another Layman's term)

> I have looked at some of the auctions and valuations of these coins.
> In order to preserve/increase whatever value there is in these coins,
> are these worth sending out for grading?  I was most concerned about
> the 1827 half being counterfeit, but then I remembered that my Grandpa
> worked in a bank in the early 20's.

> Opinions from those more learned and experiences than me are
> appreciated.  Photos can be provided for the curious.

As much as it breaks my heart to say so, having the commems slabbed is
probably not a bad idea.  Aside from fixing a grade to the coin, the
slab itself makes a nice 'tomb for the ages' which is easy to handle and
store without worry.  This statement presupposes that none of them have
been cleaned/scratched or whizzed, conditions that would cause a grading
company to send them back 'body-bagged'.

Of the Commems you listed, which designs do you like best and why?  ;-)

Alan
'jealous of your California'

 
 
 

To Slab or Not To slab?

Post by Chrysta Wilso » Tue, 11 Feb 2003 07:39:05



says...

Quote:

> NGC offers only three free submissions when you sign up, but if you fill out your
> submission form online, you get a 10% discount.

> PCGS has recently changed their levels of service without proper notification.
> Economy submissions are now taking up to 45 business days (nine weeks).
> NGC's turnaround on economy is 21 business days.

As opposed to ANACS' Economy service which seems to be "whenever we get
around to it." Cheap, but don't hold your breath, or anything.
 
 
 

To Slab or Not To slab?

Post by Eric Tiller » Tue, 11 Feb 2003 12:38:22


Quote:


>says...

>> NGC offers only three free submissions when you sign up, but if you fill out your
>> submission form online, you get a 10% discount.

>> PCGS has recently changed their levels of service without proper notification.
>> Economy submissions are now taking up to 45 business days (nine weeks).
>> NGC's turnaround on economy is 21 business days.

>As opposed to ANACS' Economy service which seems to be "whenever we get
>around to it." Cheap, but don't hold your breath, or anything.

The last economy submission I sent to ANACS took 8 weeks turnaround time, so
the following submission I used their express service. Five or more coins is $15 a
coin, and I think from the time I sent them until the time I got them back was 15
days.
 --
A Close look at Accugrade:

http://www.k6az.com/acg.htm

My Morgan Collection

http://www.k6az.com/morgan_collection.htm

How to tell the difference between Old and New PCI Holders

http://www.k6az.com/pci.htm

 
 
 

To Slab or Not To slab?

Post by Bob Flamini » Tue, 11 Feb 2003 12:15:18


Quote:

>> NGC offers only three free submissions when you sign up, but if you
>> fill out your submission form online, you get a 10% discount.

>> PCGS has recently changed their levels of service without proper
>> notification. Economy submissions are now taking up to 45 business
>> days (nine weeks).
>> NGC's turnaround on economy is 21 business days.

> As opposed to ANACS' Economy service which seems to be "whenever we
> get around to it." Cheap, but don't hold your breath, or anything.

As long as you go into the ANACS situation eyes wide open, it's not a
bad service. I submitted to ANACS economy on November 16 and got the
coins back January 21, which was actually sooner than I expected, given
that they were running a 10/10/10 special at the time. The submission
was for ANACS modern economy -- such a deal at $7/coin.

-Bob

 
 
 

To Slab or Not To slab?

Post by Dai L » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 05:10:45


I just got 'em yesterday.  Haven't even gotten around to inventorying
and classifying them all.  Committed to holding/selling/giving them to
my son.

After a debacle that I had years ago with a 1963 split window
Corvette, I have since learned not to "fall in love with things".

In other words, I like them all, and I look at them wist respect for
my Grandmother for having the foresight to put them away during at
time in which (I'm sure) that money was tight and she could've spent
it on something more material.

Thanks again to all for your opinions.

DaiLun

P.S.  I'm kind Of partial to the California and the San Diego because
they are the nicest, the Columbians because they are the oldest.  The
Long Island make me think of some kind of spooky science fiction money
because of the two superimposed faces.


Quote:

> > First, thanks to all for the wonderful reading.  I hope that from your
> > collective knowledge I can raise my self above the level of "bidiot".
> > Your opinions saved me from buying some A*G graded Silver Eagles just
> > recently.

> > For the benefit of my 13 mo. old son, I an trying to fill my long ago
> > abandoned coin sets and put together some 50 state quarter
> > collections, etc.

> > My Father recently passed on to me a collection of coins from himself
> > and my Grandfather.

> > Among the coins in the collection are:
> > 1827 Capped Bust half dollar, Overton # Unknown, and based on photo
> > comparison, EF-40 or slightly better condition,
> > 1926 Oregon Trail Commemorative,
> > 1925 Stone Mountain Commem.,
> > 1936 Long Island commem.,
> > 1936 San Diego Commem.
> > 1925 California Diamond Jubilee
> > 1893 Columbian Exposition Commem. half.

> > A couple of these apear (in my layman's eye) appear to be near
> > uncirculated and original condition. (Another Layman's term)

> > I have looked at some of the auctions and valuations of these coins.
> > In order to preserve/increase whatever value there is in these coins,
> > are these worth sending out for grading?  I was most concerned about
> > the 1827 half being counterfeit, but then I remembered that my Grandpa
> > worked in a bank in the early 20's.

> > Opinions from those more learned and experiences than me are
> > appreciated.  Photos can be provided for the curious.

> As much as it breaks my heart to say so, having the commems slabbed is
> probably not a bad idea.  Aside from fixing a grade to the coin, the
> slab itself makes a nice 'tomb for the ages' which is easy to handle and
> store without worry.  This statement presupposes that none of them have
> been cleaned/scratched or whizzed, conditions that would cause a grading
> company to send them back 'body-bagged'.

> Of the Commems you listed, which designs do you like best and why?  ;-)

> Alan
> 'jealous of your California'

 
 
 

To Slab or Not To slab?

Post by Chris » Thu, 13 Feb 2003 04:24:34


There's little value in having them certified unless and until you plan to
sell them. For now, you can use a Red Book or similar guide to get a sense
for the grade and value. Knowledgeable others (e.g., rcc, dealers, authors,
or the ANACS grader at a show) may be able to refine your understanding. A
few other moves might be wise, though:
Put them into reasonably priced holders and a container that will protect
them from handling or atmospheric damage. Also, until you are confident that
your son or other potential heirs understand the coins' value (both
numismatic and sentimental), jot down their history and your valuation
notes, and keep them with the coins, to reduce the chance that they are sold
unnecessarily or below true value. Congratulations on your family's success
in creating heirlooms, and good luck!
--Chris


Quote:
> I just got 'em yesterday.  Haven't even gotten around to inventorying
> and classifying them all.  Committed to holding/selling/giving them to
> my son.

> After a debacle that I had years ago with a 1963 split window
> Corvette, I have since learned not to "fall in love with things".

> In other words, I like them all, and I look at them wist respect for
> my Grandmother for having the foresight to put them away during at
> time in which (I'm sure) that money was tight and she could've spent
> it on something more material.

> Thanks again to all for your opinions.

> DaiLun

> P.S.  I'm kind Of partial to the California and the San Diego because
> they are the nicest, the Columbians because they are the oldest.  The
> Long Island make me think of some kind of spooky science fiction money
> because of the two superimposed faces.




- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> > > First, thanks to all for the wonderful reading.  I hope that from your
> > > collective knowledge I can raise my self above the level of "bidiot".
> > > Your opinions saved me from buying some A*G graded Silver Eagles just
> > > recently.

> > > For the benefit of my 13 mo. old son, I an trying to fill my long ago
> > > abandoned coin sets and put together some 50 state quarter
> > > collections, etc.

> > > My Father recently passed on to me a collection of coins from himself
> > > and my Grandfather.

> > > Among the coins in the collection are:
> > > 1827 Capped Bust half dollar, Overton # Unknown, and based on photo
> > > comparison, EF-40 or slightly better condition,
> > > 1926 Oregon Trail Commemorative,
> > > 1925 Stone Mountain Commem.,
> > > 1936 Long Island commem.,
> > > 1936 San Diego Commem.
> > > 1925 California Diamond Jubilee
> > > 1893 Columbian Exposition Commem. half.

> > > A couple of these apear (in my layman's eye) appear to be near
> > > uncirculated and original condition. (Another Layman's term)

> > > I have looked at some of the auctions and valuations of these coins.
> > > In order to preserve/increase whatever value there is in these coins,
> > > are these worth sending out for grading?  I was most concerned about
> > > the 1827 half being counterfeit, but then I remembered that my Grandpa
> > > worked in a bank in the early 20's.

> > > Opinions from those more learned and experiences than me are
> > > appreciated.  Photos can be provided for the curious.

> > As much as it breaks my heart to say so, having the commems slabbed is
> > probably not a bad idea.  Aside from fixing a grade to the coin, the
> > slab itself makes a nice 'tomb for the ages' which is easy to handle and
> > store without worry.  This statement presupposes that none of them have
> > been cleaned/scratched or whizzed, conditions that would cause a grading
> > company to send them back 'body-bagged'.

> > Of the Commems you listed, which designs do you like best and why?  ;-)

> > Alan
> > 'jealous of your California'

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