$2 bills, was: Golden Dollar - is it being discontinued?

$2 bills, was: Golden Dollar - is it being discontinued?

Post by Dave Allure » Wed, 01 May 2002 01:26:10



This is what I noticed about spending $2 bills (United States).  Most
cash registers have 5 bill slots and 5 coin slots.  Many stores have the
bill slots designated like this:  Checks, 20, 10, 5, 1.  Large bills get
slipped under the cash tray.

I have seen cashiers take my $2 bills and slip them under the tray, with
the big bills.  Do you think they get them back out to make change?
Nope!  They probably get hoarded in the safe, waiting to make a full
strap for return to the bank.

On other occasions I think I have seen the $2's put on top of the
checks, possibly to be used as change.

Actually I have no idea where the $2's end up, and would be interested
to see postings from managers and cashiers about how you handle them.

--Dave

Quote:

> Based on what I've read here before, I think you
> would be surprised how few of the $2 bills get
> circulated back to you.  Try putting a small mark
> on all the $2 bills you spend and then check for
> the mark from the next batch you pick up and
> repeat.  It's been reported that you will probably
> get about 1% back.

> >About every six months I get a box of "golden"
> >dollars and a couple of straps of $2 bills at the
> >bank. I spend them all over this small town and
> >NEVER get one back in change. Where the hell do
> >they go? I guess I'm just circulating them round
> >and round through the bank.

 
 
 

$2 bills, was: Golden Dollar - is it being discontinued?

Post by Bob Flamini » Wed, 01 May 2002 01:38:08



Quote:
> This is what I noticed about spending $2 bills (United States).
Most
> cash registers have 5 bill slots and 5 coin slots.  Many stores have
the
> bill slots designated like this:  Checks, 20, 10, 5, 1.  Large bills
get
> slipped under the cash tray.

The five-slot register works out good with the elimination of the cent
and rag-buck. You get 5c, 10c, 25c, and $1 in the coin trays, and $2,
$5, $10, and $20 in the bill trays. The last bill slot gets used for
checks, and the last coin slot gets used for paperclips, nickel rolls,
or whatever.

-Bob

 
 
 

$2 bills, was: Golden Dollar - is it being discontinued?

Post by Dik T. Winte » Wed, 01 May 2002 09:43:15


 > This is what I noticed about spending $2 bills (United States).  Most
 > cash registers have 5 bill slots and 5 coin slots.  Many stores have the
 > bill slots designated like this:  Checks, 20, 10, 5, 1.  Large bills get
 > slipped under the cash tray.

Why is it that in the US such a point is made about the number of slots?
I honestly do not understand.  In the Netherlands we have gone from
5 different coint to 6 different coins, back to 5 different coins,
back up to 6 different coins and now 8 different coins.  In the
meantime the number of reasonably valued notes (less than 100 gulden)
started at 2, up to 3, up to 4, back to 3, and now 4.  In all those years
(since 1960 or somesuch) the only complaint I hear is about the required
change of tray inlay for the last change.  Most inlays I see have equally
sized slots for coins and notes.  So now the shops have mostly slots for
8 different coins and 3 different notes, and that is it.  The only
change needed now is from 10 to 12 slots.  So there was some complaint,
but by far not an outcry.  No slot for checks.  Payment by check is
non-existant here since 1/1/2002, although it did get used a bit before
that date (actually they were not checks as they were guaranteed, checks
have never been used for day-to-day payment, and those thingies were
put under the inlay).  Many of the larger transactions are now made
with a banking card that you pull through an apparatus so that your
account is immediately debited and the shop's account credited by that
amount (the same card can be used to get money from foreign ATM's).
Credit cards are virtually not used, and in many cases you have to pay
an addition when you pay by credit card (some time ago a Dutch judge
has ruled that the requirement of credit card companies that a shop
owner would not do that was unfair, and so any such agreement was void).
In addition there is also card cash money used.  You can load your card
with money and spend it at shops until the card is empty, at which time
you can load it again.
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj  amsterdam, nederland, +31205924131
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn  amsterdam, nederland; http://www.cwi.nl/~dik/

 
 
 

$2 bills, was: Golden Dollar - is it being discontinued?

Post by Kaleb S. KEITHL » Wed, 01 May 2002 19:40:27



Quote:

> > This is what I noticed about spending $2 bills (United States).  Most
> > cash registers have 5 bill slots and 5 coin slots.  Many stores have the
> > bill slots designated like this:  Checks, 20, 10, 5, 1.  Large bills get
> > slipped under the cash tray.

>Why is it that in the US such a point is made about the number of slots?

Because they can't think of a Real reason not to use dollar coins! :-)

Most cash registers have plenty of slots, or have adjustable slots.

--

Kaleb S. KEITHLEY

 
 
 

$2 bills, was: Golden Dollar - is it being discontinued?

Post by Dave Allure » Thu, 02 May 2002 01:44:36


Dik, this is a good question.  In most of the stores I visit in the US,
the cash register drawers are just the right size for five bills wide
and two slots deep.  Coins in the front five slots, bills in the back
five slots.

I do not think that most of the trays have adjustable slots.  I think
that most US cash regisers have drawers than are shallower and narrower
than in Europe.  Even with new insert trays, there would probably not be
enough room for six kinds of bills plus all the coins we are used to.

So to hold more denominations of bills, businesses might have to
purchase all-new cash registers.  This would certainly result in a lot
of outcry.  This is one of the main reasons why I keep pushing to not
expand the number of paper and coin denominations in common use in the
US.  This is why the US should not reintroduce the $2 FRN to replace the
$1; we should get used to $5 bills instead.

Now I do not work in retail, so I am making a big assumption about what
kind of cash register is in common use.  I have said what I see.  I
would really like to hear from more US business people about this.
TIA.    ;-)

--Dave

Quote:

> Why is it that in the US such a point is made about
> the number of slots?  I honestly do not understand.
> In the Netherlands we have gone from 5 different
> coint to 6 different coins, back to 5 different coins,
> back up to 6 different coins and now 8 different
> coins.  In the meantime the number of reasonably
> valued notes (less than 100 gulden) started at 2, up
> to 3, up to 4, back to 3, and now 4.  In all those
> years (since 1960 or somesuch) the only complaint I
> hear is about the required change of tray inlay for
> the last change.  Most inlays I see have equally sized
> slots for coins and notes.  So now the shops have
> mostly slots for 8 different coins and 3 different
> notes, and that is it.  The only change needed now is
> from 10 to 12 slots ...

>  > This is what I noticed about spending $2 bills
>  > (United States).  Most cash registers have 5 bill
>  > slots and 5 coin slots.  Many stores have the bill
>  > slots designated like this:  Checks, 20, 10, 5, 1.
>  >  Large bills get slipped under the cash tray ...

 
 
 

$2 bills, was: Golden Dollar - is it being discontinued?

Post by Barn » Fri, 03 May 2002 02:25:03


Quote:

>Now I do not work in retail, so I am making a big assumption about what
>kind of cash register is in common use.  I have said what I see.  I
>would really like to hear from more US business people about this.
>TIA.    ;-)

I'm a cashier in a photo dept at the local food store.  The register I work
with has 5 slots for bills and 5 slots for coins.  I always bring 2 rolls of
golden dollars to work.  Because I take over a register that's been used
earlier that day, I have to do a little work to clear things out for the
golden dollar.  The last coin slot on the left usually has some rolls of coins
and a paper clip or two in it.  I take the rolls of coins (and one roll of
golden dollars) and put them under the till where there are pockets designed
to store some coin rolls.  Then I open the other roll of golden dollars and
dump them into the last coin slot on the left.

I use the last paper slot on the left for $100/$50 bills, receipts, coupons
and checks.  It really does not matter what kind of stuff gets in there since
I will rarely have to use a $50 or $100 bill for change.  If I do end up using
one of them higher bills, I'll just fish it out from all of the other paper
since it's easier to me to do that than lift up the drawer to grab a bill.  

I worked at another store where it was policy to put anything that was $20 or
lager under the till, so that's what I did.  I don't remember what the last
paper slot was used for, however it was probably used for coupons ect.  
Personally I hate having to put any bills under the drawer because when it
comes time to fish them out, they are scattered all over the place and have to
be picked up, straightened before counting ect.  It can be a real mess under
there sometimes!

Barney