Can I get the Australian expert please?

Can I get the Australian expert please?

Post by coulp.. » Wed, 21 Jul 1999 04:00:00



Don't know of anything that is in less demand than Australia unless it
is Bulgium. Most 1/2 pennies and pennies catalog for .20 to .50 in
Good. "Fair" is actually not much better than a cull. Dealers tend to
pay 3c for foreign coins. Notwithstanding, anything is possible on E-
bay. There is one outstanding exception and that is the 1930 penny. Got
one?


Quote:
> I've got a handful of australian pennies and half pennies, the pennies
> range from 1916 to the early 1960s, and the half pennies go from about
> 1933 to 1964.  I'm wondering what the value of these would be, they
seem
> to be in fair shape, but I don't really know for sure.  The oldest one
> is 1916, and appears to have an "I" mint mark below the scrolly.  I
have
> the back of one of the pennies here:

> http://www.net-link.net/~osiris/coin.jpg

> Any ideas on where I would find a market for these?

> -- Jack Tarkaan                                      Kalamazoo,
Michigan
> -- http://www.bigfoot.com/~tarkaan


Quote:
> -- NO UNSOLICITED E-MAIL AT THIS ADDRESS - Respect privacy - NO
SPAM!!!!

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.
 
 
 

Can I get the Australian expert please?

Post by Fulvio Gerar » Fri, 23 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> What's so special about 1930?

What's special is that there were no 1930 pennies issued, thanks to the
depression. However, the Royal Australian Mint conducted tours then as
now, and the tour guides would strike pennies to demonstrate the process,
and visitors could exchange one of their pennies for the new one just
struck. (nowadays, a $1 coin struck this way costs you $2, go figure)

Anyway, being a depression and all that, there were not many visitors, and
fewer who were flush with funds, and fewer still who could salt the new
coins away. therefore, they're pretty scarce.

Some 1,600 were supposedly minted this way, yet I've seen reports that as
few as 74 can now be positively accounted for.

Downies in Melbourne (also in Lansing, MI, and on the web at downies.com I
think) have a nice VF in their latest mailout for a mere $US11,600, which
could be a long-term bargain, maybe.

Also be aware of numerous forgeries which were made out of 1938 pennies.
Some were pretty hard to spot as I recall.

As to the values of your bag of coins, why not get onto Downies (and
Monetarium, among others) mailing list and check their asking prices? I
find that a stack of dealer lists is more of an indication of true market
value than your average catalogue.

 
 
 

Can I get the Australian expert please?

Post by Fulvio Gerar » Fri, 23 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> What's so special about 1930?

What's special is that there were no 1930 pennies issued, thanks to the
depression. However, the Royal Australian Mint conducted tours then as
now, and the tour guides would strike pennies to demonstrate the process,
and visitors could exchange one of their pennies for the new one just
struck. (nowadays, a $1 coin struck this way costs you $2, go figure)

Anyway, being a depression and all that, there were not many visitors, and
fewer who were flush with funds, and fewer still who could salt the new
coins away. therefore, they're pretty scarce.

Some 1,600 were supposedly minted this way, yet I've seen reports that as
few as 74 can now be positively accounted for.

Downies in Melbourne (also in Lansing, MI, and on the web at downies.com I
think) have a nice VF in their latest mailout for a mere $US11,600, which
could be a long-term bargain, maybe.

Also be aware of numerous forgeries which were made out of 1938 pennies.
Some were pretty hard to spot as I recall.

As to the values of your bag of coins, why not get onto Downies (and
Monetarium, among others) mailing list and check their asking prices? I
find that a stack of dealer lists is more of an indication of true market
value than your average catalogue.

 
 
 

Can I get the Australian expert please?

Post by Fulvio Gerar » Fri, 23 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> What's so special about 1930?

What's special is that there were no 1930 pennies issued, thanks to the
depression. However, the Royal Australian Mint conducted tours then as
now, and the tour guides would strike pennies to demonstrate the process,
and visitors could exchange one of their pennies for the new one just
struck. (nowadays, a $1 coin struck this way costs you $2, go figure)

Anyway, being a depression and all that, there were not many visitors, and
fewer who were flush with funds, and fewer still who could salt the new
coins away. therefore, they're pretty scarce.

Some 1,600 were supposedly minted this way, yet I've seen reports that as
few as 74 can now be positively accounted for.

Downies in Melbourne (also in Lansing, MI, and on the web at downies.com I
think) have a nice VF in their latest mailout for a mere $US11,600, which
could be a long-term bargain, maybe.

Also be aware of numerous forgeries which were made out of 1938 pennies.
Some were pretty hard to spot as I recall.

As to the values of your bag of coins, why not get onto Downies (and
Monetarium, among others) mailing list and check their asking prices? I
find that a stack of dealer lists is more of an indication of true market
value than your average catalogue.

 
 
 

Can I get the Australian expert please?

Post by Fulvio Gerar » Fri, 23 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> What's so special about 1930?

What's special is that there were no 1930 pennies issued, thanks to the
depression. However, the Royal Australian Mint conducted tours then as
now, and the tour guides would strike pennies to demonstrate the process,
and visitors could exchange one of their pennies for the new one just
struck. (nowadays, a $1 coin struck this way costs you $2, go figure)

Anyway, being a depression and all that, there were not many visitors, and
fewer who were flush with funds, and fewer still who could salt the new
coins away. therefore, they're pretty scarce.

Some 1,600 were supposedly minted this way, yet I've seen reports that as
few as 74 can now be positively accounted for.

Downies in Melbourne (also in Lansing, MI, and on the web at downies.com I
think) have a nice VF in their latest mailout for a mere $US11,600, which
could be a long-term bargain, maybe.

Also be aware of numerous forgeries which were made out of 1938 pennies.
Some were pretty hard to spot as I recall.

As to the values of your bag of coins, why not get onto Downies (and
Monetarium, among others) mailing list and check their asking prices? I
find that a stack of dealer lists is more of an indication of true market
value than your average catalogue.

 
 
 

Can I get the Australian expert please?

Post by Fulvio Gerar » Sat, 24 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> I think not.  Almost all 1930 Australian pennies are circulated.

Correct. Which supports the story. At the time, money was tight enough
that most people couldn't afford to just stick it in the bottom drawer and
forget it. And a visit to the mint was nothing like it is today. When they
built the new mint in Canberra, they put an elevated visitors gallery in,
something that wasn't contemplated in earlier years. The plethora of
'collector' issues simply didn't exist back then, even proofs were struck
for practical, not marketing, reasons.

I'll stand by the story, as it came from ex-employees of the Melbourne
mint. That doesn't mean it might not be folklore anyway, of course, but I
haven't seen any other versions other than 'nobody really knows' and 'its
a mystery'.

Quote:
> No one is going to be fooled by a 1938 penny altered to 1930.
> The design on both sides is completely different, the King is
> different.

Today, this is true. But there were widely-publicised incidents as
recently as the 70's. Obviously the fakes were produced much earlier, and
I mentioned it not because I think anyone would be likely to be taken in,
but rather to point out that they do exist. And I wonder what value a fake
would have, given the high value of many of our stamp forgeries?

Quote:
> Downies prices are very high in comparison to other Australian
> coin dealers, beware what you buy from them.  They do carry some
> rarities that you won't find elsewhere.

Again, true. Unless you lean across the counter and do a spot of
arm-twisting, of course. I don't think I've ever paid them anywhere near
the asking price, other than new issues at official prices, that is.
Besides, anyone ever seen a cheap dealer?

FWIW, a quick look in Monetarium's most recent catalogue shows a gF/abt.VF
1930 penny for $12,500, about $3k more than Downie's price for a similar
coin at about the same time.

Caveat Emptor, Your Mileage May Vary, and all that jazz. ;)