1943 steel penny

1943 steel penny

Post by Gail Coope » Thu, 03 Jun 1999 04:00:00



I just zapped the previous message into oblivion--sorry.
Are the 1943 "steel" wheat sheaf pennies valuable? my cousin said they were.
I have one.
Gail Cooper
 
 
 

1943 steel penny

Post by PFDJ » Thu, 03 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>>>Are the 1943 "steel" wheat sheaf pennies valuable? my cousin said they were.

I have one<<<

No...they are relatively common..

***************************
Phil DeMayo
Coinmasters 1188
ANA R-182606

***************************

 
 
 

1943 steel penny

Post by Ed Hendrick » Thu, 03 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Gail.

The short answer is - NO.  The 1943 cents were all suppose to be zinc-coated
steel and over a billion of them were minted.  In order to be worth more
than a few cents, they would have to be in Mint State condition, then they
would be worth only a buck or two.  Sorry.  Good find though, its a good
year (my birth year).

Ed


Quote:
> I just zapped the previous message into oblivion--sorry.
> Are the 1943 "steel" wheat sheaf pennies valuable? my cousin said they
were.
> I have one.
> Gail Cooper

 
 
 

1943 steel penny

Post by Rich L Sandma » Thu, 03 Jun 1999 04:00:00


But a nice find to add to the collection!!
RIch Sandman

 
 
 

1943 steel penny

Post by Joe Sewe » Mon, 07 Jun 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

>I just zapped the previous message into oblivion--sorry.
>Are the 1943 "steel" wheat sheaf pennies valuable? my cousin said they were.
>I have one.

To fill in the blanks left in other messages...

In 1943, copper was in high demand due to the war effort.  Thus the Mint
replaced the normal bronze blanks with zinc-coated steel blanks for the
1943 cents.  In 1944-46, copper returned when the coins were made out of
brass from spent shell casings.

The really valuable 1943 cents are the handful that were accidentally made
from bronze blanks left in the hoppers.  These are all accounted for (in
spite of the false rumor that someone in Idaho had accidentally released
one back into circulation); those that you might run across are more
likely counterfeits or copper-plated steelies.
--

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1943 steel penny

Post by Alan Herber » Tue, 08 Jun 1999 04:00:00


The controversy about the 1943 cents has helped to revive another
misrepresentation concerning the 1944 to 1946 cents. Ed Rochette researched
this and found that only a token amount of brass shell casings were used in
the cents of those three years, with most, or all of it coming from the
training camps in the US. The original story was promoted by the government
as patriotic propaganda. What was ignored at the time was that the shell
casings are 70 percent copper and 30 percent zinc, a brass alloy. More
copper had to be added anyway to bring the alloy up to the 95 percent
copper, 5 percent zinc used for coins, so the shell casings were not a
practical source of metal.
As far as the 1943 cents were concerned, the Mint in 1942 removed all but a
trace of tin from the alloy. Without tin, it was not bronze, but instead was
a brass alloy, and these  brass planchets are the source of the accidental
strikes in 1943 on the wrong metal. To avoid the negative reaction of the
public to brass coins, the Mint continued to call them bronze, a practice
that continued after the last of the tin was removed in 1962. In a similar
vein, the Mint never referred to the steel 1943 cents as anything but
"coated," attempting to avoid the negative reaction to "plated" coins.
Alan Herbert - Contributing Editor - Numismatic News