1943 steel penny

1943 steel penny

Post by FISCHER,CARL,ARTH » Mon, 05 Sep 1994 06:02:00



Keywords:  

I have a 1943 steel penny that is in excelent condition as far as wear. It
looks almost uncirculated. The problem is that it  is a very shiny silver
color, almost as if it had been coated or cleaned, instead of the sort of dull
grey color the other steel pennies I have are. Has anyone come across this
sort of thin before, or does anyone know how or if I should remove this
"coating". Thanks

 
 
 

1943 steel penny

Post by Chief Stuart Hanebu » Wed, 07 Sep 1994 02:30:36


Quote:

>Keywords:  
>I have a 1943 steel penny that is in excelent condition as far as wear. It
>looks almost uncirculated. The problem is that it  is a very shiny silver
>color, almost as if it had been coated or cleaned, instead of the sort of dull
>grey color the other steel pennies I have are. Has anyone come across this
>sort of thin before, or does anyone know how or if I should remove this
>"coating". Thanks

Some got the **bright** idea several years ago that you could electroplate the
 old steelies with zinc to make them look "new" again,  when this started
happening coins in the VF-XF range were passed off as UNCs.  As I recall the
best way to grade these is to look at the wear and detail in the hair, and
Look at the lines on the wheat stalks, sometimes the lines get clogged when
the coins are electroplated.  It is also possible that you have a very fine
specimen.  As always do not try to clean the coin.

Good Luck,

Stu
--
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1943 steel penny

Post by pschik » Wed, 07 Sep 1994 10:13:04



Quote:

>Keywords:  

>I have a 1943 steel penny that is in excelent condition as far as wear. It
>looks almost uncirculated. The problem is that it  is a very shiny silver
>color, almost as if it had been coated or cleaned, instead of the sort of dull
>grey color the other steel pennies I have are.

Actually, uncirculated steel cents should be shiny.  It's only after
circulation and/or exposure to corrosive materials that they turn dull.
If it is obviously _not_ uncirculated, and still shiny, then I would say
that it has been polished somehow.

-Paul Schikora

 
 
 

1943 steel penny

Post by joe greg » Wed, 07 Sep 1994 23:55:13



Quote:



>>Keywords:  

>>I have a 1943 steel penny that is in excelent condition as far as wear. It
>>looks almost uncirculated. The problem is that it  is a very shiny silver
>>color, almost as if it had been coated or cleaned, instead of the sort of dull
>>grey color the other steel pennies I have are.

>Actually, uncirculated steel cents should be shiny.  It's only after
>circulation and/or exposure to corrosive materials that they turn dull.
>If it is obviously _not_ uncirculated, and still shiny, then I would say
>that it has been polished somehow.

    Actually, there are several varieties of "shiny-ness" that mean different
things. If the coin is truly uncirculated and uncorroded it will exhibit mint
luster and a thing called a cartwheel effect. If you move the penny around
undera strong light you would see a line of light reflected off the coins
surface. This line goes straight (sort of) from the center of the coin to
the edge and will seem to rotate around as you move the coin. I don't know
how common or noticable this effect is on steel cents, though. If the coin
has been polished or plated much of the miror detail will be missing (i.e.
the design will look a little bit mushy, or not real sharp) and the shiny-ness
will be uniform over the entire surface, and more mirror like. A big giveaway
that the coin is plated or polished is that the shiny-ness will be the same
on the design (Lincolns head) as it is in the field (flat portion of the coin).

        -- Joe

________________________________________________________________________________

 Joseph Gregor                  |  


________________________________|_______________________________________________

 
 
 

1943 steel penny

Post by Ken Leona » Thu, 08 Sep 1994 02:28:34


: Keywords:  

: I have a 1943 steel penny that is in excelent condition as far as wear. It
: looks almost uncirculated. The problem is that it  is a very shiny silver
: color, almost as if it had been coated or cleaned, instead of the sort of dull
: grey color the other steel pennies I have are. Has anyone come across this
: sort of thin before, or does anyone know how or if I should remove this
: "coating". Thanks

What you have is a replated steel cent (*not penny*!!). These were done
in the millions in the 1950's and '60's. In my opinion they are damaged
coins and are not even worth the 1 cent they are supposed to be. A local
swap meet dealer (who no longer is in business) had the gall to sell
these mutants for 99 cents each to unsuspecting souls for several years.

-Ken Leonard

 
 
 

1943 steel penny

Post by Ken Leona » Thu, 08 Sep 1994 02:30:14



: >Keywords:  
: >
: >I have a 1943 steel penny that is in excelent condition as far as wear. It
: >looks almost uncirculated. The problem is that it  is a very shiny silver
: >color, almost as if it had been coated or cleaned, instead of the sort of dull
: >grey color the other steel pennies I have are.

: Actually, uncirculated steel cents should be shiny.  It's only after
: circulation and/or exposure to corrosive materials that they turn dull.
: If it is obviously _not_ uncirculated, and still shiny, then I would say
: that it has been polished somehow.

: -Paul Schikora

True uncirculated steel cents have a bluish tinge to them and of course
have absolutely no wear.

-Ken Leonard