Grading for 1802 Draped Bust Cent

Grading for 1802 Draped Bust Cent

Post by DNUK » Fri, 25 Jun 1999 04:00:00



I would grade it f-12 to f-15.  There is a corresponding weakness of strike on
the right side of reverse and obverse.  1802 are pretty easy to come by without
problems---I would recommend waiting on this unless you are comfortable with
the tooling and corrosion.
 
 
 

Grading for 1802 Draped Bust Cent

Post by Roxanne Goldberg, CP » Fri, 25 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Dear friends,
             Due to the tooling and corrosion, I would grade this coin
VG, net AG, in EAC grading.  It might have better detail, but I can't
tell from the scan.  I do know that its multiple problems drop its net
grade, significantly.  Too bad, it was not a better scan.  I might have
seen more detail, then.

     Oh well.  Buy what you like, not what someone tells you to.  I
can't even attribute the coin from this scan.

     Have a good day.
        Roxanne :)

 
 
 

Grading for 1802 Draped Bust Cent

Post by Peter T. Davi » Fri, 25 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Thank you Jeff, DNUKE, and Roxanne for your advice on the grading of this
coin.  It seems that I may have been a bit harsh in my grading but the
consensus is that because of the problems with this coin such as corrosion
that it wouldn't be a good buy anyway.  
I appreciate the help as this is my first small steps into coins of this
vintage.  I'm especially interested in pre-1815 coins of all types (if
there's anyone in the Boston area who collects these and wants to be my
mentor I'd be happy to fawn admiringly over your collection 8-)
Also, selection of books may be useful, as I said I'm using James Ruddy's
_Photograde_ right now, does this book conservatively grade coins?
Thanks again,
Peter Davis
 
 
 

Grading for 1802 Draped Bust Cent

Post by Denis Lori » Fri, 25 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>Also, selection of books may be useful, as I said I'm using James Ruddy's
>_Photograde_ right now, does this book conservatively grade coins?
>Thanks again,
>Peter Davis

In my opinion, Photograde is overly liberal in its grading of early copper.  In
particular, it tends to use a coin's sharpness as its overall (net) grade,
without taking into account surface defects such as porosity or pitting.  I
recommend the ANA grading guide instead.
Denis Loring

 
 
 

Grading for 1802 Draped Bust Cent

Post by Mike Bagb » Fri, 25 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>In my opinion, Photograde is overly liberal in its grading of early copper.
In
>particular, it tends to use a coin's sharpness as its overall (net) grade,
>without taking into account surface defects such as porosity or pitting.  I
>recommend the ANA grading guide instead.

Speaking of net grading for early coppers, I picked up a mini-horde of
around 180 Large Cents a couple of weeks ago.

Instead of trying to sell these coins by the pound, I bought the Noyes two
vol. set on Large Cents.  Right now I am just pulling the AUs, XFs out of
the horde because they seem to be easy to attribute.  I may start tackling
the VGs & Goods soon.

While grading these coins on details seems simple enough, I'm beginning to
wonder how surface defects effort the overall net grade.

Pictured below are two early dates that I have graded XF based on details,
however both coins have problems.

The first coin is a 1818 that I have attributed as a N.10 :

http://www.geocities.com/Baja/Mesa/9147/1525.jpg

The Obverse is pretty must defect-free, but the Reverse has some 'gunk'
growing on it at 7 o'clock.  While most of it seems to be on the surface on
the coin, I'm sure some of it has worked itself into the copper.

How does this effect grade?

The second coin is a 1819 that I have attributed as a N.4 :

http://www.geocities.com/Baja/Mesa/9147/1542.jpg

The Obverse exhibits light (in depth) pitting at 2-3 o'clock (stars 9 to 12)
along the rim.  The Reverse shows light pitting around RICA of AMERICA and a
deeper spot over the T of CENT.  One more spot just below OF.

Grade effect?

~mb

~mb

 
 
 

Grading for 1802 Draped Bust Cent

Post by Denis Lori » Sat, 26 Jun 1999 04:00:00


from mb:

[snip]

Quote:
>....wonder how surface defects effort the overall net grade.

>Pictured below are two early dates that I have graded XF based on details,
>however both coins have problems.

>The first coin is a 1818 that I have attributed as a N.10 :
>The Obverse is pretty must defect-free, but the Reverse has some 'gunk'
>growing on it at 7 o'clock.  While most of it seems to be on the surface on
>the coin, I'm sure some of it has worked itself into the copper.

>How does this effect grade?

***I agree with N10.  From the scan, the "gunk" looks minor, and may even be
removable.  I'd take off no more than five points for it, maybe reducing an
XF-40 to a VF-35.***

Quote:
>The second coin is a 1819 that I have attributed as a N.4
>The Obverse exhibits light (in depth) pitting at 2-3 o'clock (stars 9 to 12)
>along the rim.  The Reverse shows light pitting around RICA of AMERICA and a
>deeper spot over the T of CENT.  One more spot just below OF.

>Grade effect?

***Again, I agree with N4-- nice find!  That's one of the two scarce 1819's.
Theproblem here is that the corrosion is more extensive, and worse, more
disfiguring.  On my screen, it shows up as much lighter in color than the rest
of the coin.  The edges don't look perfect either.  If the sharpness is XF,
this coin could net down to a low VF at best.  It's VERY tough to grade problem
coins other than "in the copper" (and it ain't so easy then either!)***

Denis Loring