The Ins and Outs of Kegging

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by Lowell Blik » Wed, 23 Jul 1997 04:00:00



I've just received my first corny and the directions explicitly state
that the CO2 should go into the "OUT" plug, and the beer be poured out
of the "IN" plug.  Is this right?  This uns the CO2 through the pipe
to the bottom and the beer is somehow forced through the short pipe on
top.

Also, how long should it take for my 5 pound CO2 canister to add a
measurable amount of of gas into the keg?  I just want to get 5 psi
into the keg then chill it and add the necessary amount tomorrow.
I've had the tank on full for the last 15 minutes and the keg's
pressure gauge hasn't moved.  The CO2 tank's guage reads 1000 psi.  Am
I about to send shrapnel throughout my house?

Lowell

 
 
 

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by Dean Carrier » Wed, 23 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
> I've just received my first corny and the directions explicitly state
> that the CO2 should go into the "OUT" plug, and the beer be poured out
> of the "IN" plug.  Is this right?  This uns the CO2 through the pipe
> to the bottom and the beer is somehow forced through the short pipe on
> top.

Nope.. OUT means OUT.  Your CO2 should be connected to the IN and the tap
line connected to the OUT.  The short tube won't let any beer out unless
the liquid level is higher than the bottom of it.  The long tube is for the
liquid to be despensed through.  Tear up them instructions.  I think they
were written on a planet where CO2 is heavier than beer.  ;o)

Quote:
> Also, how long should it take for my 5 pound CO2 canister to add a
> measurable amount of of gas into the keg?  I just want to get 5 psi
> into the keg then chill it and add the necessary amount tomorrow.

Whatcha needa do is attatch the gas line and let it sit at a fairly
constant temperature hooked up until the beer can't hold any more gas at
that temperature.  I usually let mine sit for a week as the gas slowly gets
let off of the CO2 tank into my brew.  While in a pinch, you *can* shake
the keg vigorously while the gas hyper-dissolves like it's going out of
style, you'll not only get big fish-eye bubbles that don't last as long
after a pint is pulled but you'll also stir up any sediment that has
settled out while aging in the keg and you'll lose some clarity.  Patience
is a virtue.  You'll very seldome hear the regulator let a puff of CO2 into
your keg unless you're shaking it but don't worry, it's going just fine.
BTW you can use the shake method to carbonate in under 30 minutes or do it
right over a few days.

The colder your keg is, the less PSI you need; and vice versa.  At room
temperature, you'll need about 30 PSI to get an average carbonation level
of about 2.5 volumes of CO2 - the typical can of Bud.  Here's the formula
to use to get an exact level of carbonation.
Carbonation is measured in volumes.  One volume of CO2 is equal to one
litre of CO2 dissolved in one litre of liquid so we get this formula...

Pressure = F(Temperature, Volume)
Pressure = -16.6999-0.0101059 T + 0.00116512 T^2 + 0.173354 T V + 4.24267 V
- 0.0684226^2  {where ^ indicates exponential}

Quote:
> I've had the tank on full for the last 15 minutes and the keg's
> pressure gauge hasn't moved.  The CO2 tank's guage reads 1000 psi.  Am
> I about to send shrapnel throughout my house?

You have a full tank no doubt.  The regulator showing 1000 PSI tells you
your keg's pressure and 1000 PSI is normal - and moves very slowly as the
keg empties over time.  The other gauge (if you have a dual guage
regulator) tells you how many PSI are in your gas line to your keg.  This
line will usually not read any higher than 50 PSI - unless, of course,
you're running air tools on your CO2.  It will be quickly adjustable via a
set-screw.

Check out The Brewery web site for a full carbonation table.  I keep mine
taped to the side of the brew fridge for quick reference at all times.
Also, there's a good back-issue of Zymurgy that covers kegging.

 
 
 

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by RUSt1d » Wed, 23 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> <snip> While in a pinch, you *can* shake
> the keg vigorously while the gas hyper-dissolves like it's going out of
> style, you'll not only get big fish-eye bubbles that don't last as long
> after a pint is pulled <snip>

This has been discussed many times in this forum. CO2 is CO2. You will
not get different size bubbles out based on how you put the CO2 into
solution.

Quote:
> <snip> You have a full tank no doubt.  The regulator showing 1000 PSI tells you
> your keg's pressure and 1000 PSI is normal - and moves very slowly as the
> keg empties over time. <snip>

The first regulator shows you the pressure in the tank, not the keg.
Mine usually reads 800 PSI (in the fridge) and stays there until all the
liquid CO2 in the tank is evaporated and then starts to drop. 1000 PSI
on the keg would bad.

--
John Varady                     http://www.netaxs.com/~vectorsys/varady
Boneyard Brewing                The HomeBrew Recipe Calculating Program

 
 
 

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by Andrew Perro » Wed, 23 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:


> > <snip> While in a pinch, you *can* shake
> > the keg vigorously while the gas hyper-dissolves like it's going out of
> > style, you'll not only get big fish-eye bubbles that don't last as long
> > after a pint is pulled <snip>

> This has been discussed many times in this forum. CO2 is CO2. You will
> not get different size bubbles out based on how you put the CO2 into
> solution.

I recently read an article, or a section of a book (I wish I could
remember where) that stated something to the effect that yes CO2 is CO2,
as far as source.  However, the difference lies in the method.  CO2 from
a keg won't reduce head stability or cause large bubbles in and of
itself, but by vigorously shaking a keg to quickly carbonate it, you can
break up some of the medium length proteins which improve head
stability.  Of course, shaking the keg less vigorously will allow you to
carbonate it and still maintain the proteins at a desireable size I
would imagine.  Personally I use the plug and wait method,  but would
definitely use a light shaking method if I needed my beer immediately. I
think that the benefits of rapid carbonation outweigh the possible
disadvantages of breaking up proteins (I mean it can't be that easy to
break up the proteins can it?).

<snip, snip, snip>

--
     _
    | | Andrew Perron

   /   \
  /     \
 _|_    |
(__O)   _
(___O)(O_)
(___O)  |
(__O)   |
  |_____|

 
 
 

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by Gary Eckhard » Wed, 23 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I've just received my first corny and the directions explicitly state
> that the CO2 should go into the "OUT" plug, and the beer be poured out
> of the "IN" plug.  Is this right?  This uns the CO2 through the pipe
> to the bottom and the beer is somehow forced through the short pipe on
> top.

I dunno who you got your instructions from, but it's apparent they
suffer from a dislexia condition.  Reverse everything you said in
the previous paragraph and it will be right.

In addition, the connectors on a keg (at least ball-lock) are
different for gas-in and liquid-out.  Both have a "ridge" that
goes around the connector about halfway down, but the liquid-out
ridge is "wider".  (Look at it and you'll see what I'm talking about).
What I'm getting at is that the connectors won't fit properly if you
reverse everything.  Well, the WILL fit, if you force them enough,
a fact I know from experience/previous ignorance.... ;^>

Quote:
> Also, how long should it take for my 5 pound CO2 canister to add a
> measurable amount of of gas into the keg?  I just want to get 5 psi
> into the keg then chill it and add the necessary amount tomorrow.
> I've had the tank on full for the last 15 minutes and the keg's
> pressure gauge hasn't moved.  The CO2 tank's guage reads 1000 psi.  Am
> I about to send shrapnel throughout my house?

The 1000psi is the pressure of the gas inside of your CO2 tank, not
your keg.  Since you have that gauge, you should have another gauge
that states the psi of the gas going out of the CO2 tank, and it will
shut off when the keg reaches this pressure.  You should be able to
hear the gas going into the tank, and stop when the keg is pressurized
at where you want it.  If you want to carbonate quickly, you can
shake the keg while applying CO2 to the keg.  You will notice that
everytime you shake the keg more CO2 goes in, as the gas is being
put into suspension (the beer).

---------------------------+----------------------------------------------
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The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by jlheube » Thu, 24 Jul 1997 04:00:00


You shouldn't.  If you end up getting more pressure in the keg than what
the regulator is putting out you'll get backflow to the regulator and may
damage it if there's no check valve.  
--
heubs

Spammers forced me into this. Real responses...remove you know what.



Quote:
> Through trial and error, I've figured out my question concerning CO2
> pressure.  So that's what that big***on the regulator is for.
> Instructions on the container would have been nice.  

> I still don't understand why I should reverse my use of the in and out
> valves on the keg.

> Lowell

 
 
 

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by Keith Payn » Thu, 24 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> You shouldn't.  If you end up getting more pressure in the keg than what
> the regulator is putting out you'll get backflow to the regulator and may
> damage it if there's no check valve.
> --
> heubs

> Spammers forced me into this. Real responses...remove you know what.



> > Through trial and error, I've figured out my question concerning CO2
> > pressure.  So that's what that big***on the regulator is for.
> > Instructions on the container would have been nice.

> > I still don't understand why I should reverse my use of the in and out
> > valves on the keg.

> > Lowell

I do know some keggers who put gas into the "out" valve when carbonating.
This simply forces the gas up through the liquid.  They say it makes for
a faster and more thorough carbonation.  In this case, you would not
leave the gas hooked up all the time, just a couple times a day hookup,
pressurize, and unhook.
 
 
 

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by reirgj » Thu, 24 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I've just received my first corny and the directions explicitly state
> that the CO2 should go into the "OUT" plug, and the beer be poured out
> of the "IN" plug.  Is this right?  This uns the CO2 through the pipe
> to the bottom and the beer is somehow forced through the short pipe on
> top.

> Also, how long should it take for my 5 pound CO2 canister to add a
> measurable amount of of gas into the keg?  I just want to get 5 psi
> into the keg then chill it and add the necessary amount tomorrow.
> I've had the tank on full for the last 15 minutes and the keg's
> pressure gauge hasn't moved.  The CO2 tank's guage reads 1000 psi.  Am
> I about to send shrapnel throughout my house?

> Lowell

First I'll Assume you have a two guage regulator.  The 1000psi reading
is normal for an ambient temperature of around 80degF.  Your other guage
tells you what the pressure is in the keg you are attached to.

wrt attaching CO2 to the "OUT" port.  This is will allow you to
carbonate your beer a little quicker.  By injecting CO2 into the
out port the CO2 must pass through all the beer to get to the
surface.  If you use this method, make sure you first purge the
air from the top of your keg.  To do this definitely attach your
CO2 line to the "IN" connector, purge the air, then attach to the
"OUT" port.  

I have carbonation stones in two of my kegs.  These attach to the
a hose that is attached to the "IN" connector, inside the keg.
I can carbonate a beer perfectly in about 20 minutes, by simply
starting the CO2 at 1psi and every few minutes adding another
1psi of pressure, until I reach the desired pressure.

Brian

 
 
 

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by reirgj » Thu, 24 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:



> <deletia>

> > I have carbonation stones in two of my kegs.  These attach to the
> > a hose that is attached to the "IN" connector, inside the keg.
> > I can carbonate a beer perfectly in about 20 minutes, by simply
> > starting the CO2 at 1psi and every few minutes adding another
> > 1psi of pressure, until I reach the desired pressure.

> > Brian

> Tell us more about this magical "carbonation stone"!

> PM (I poured my first mug of foam from my new keg last night! Yum.)

It is a stainless steel stone, manufactured by "Liquid Bread."
Connect a section of 1/4" i.d. tubing to the stone and to the
***, inside the keg, of the "IN" connector. The stone should be
on the bottom of the keg for best results, mine are about an inch
above the bottom.

Siphon in your beer, seal the keg, then start the CO2 at 1psi.
Once the CO2 stops flowing vent the keg. Repeat this twice.
Then everytime the CO2 stop flowing bump up the CO2 pressure by
1 psi, about once every 3-4 minutes.  For an Ale it takes about
20 minutes total to get the pressure up to 5 psi. (My beer is
almost always cooled to 34degF prior to kegging.)

These normally stone cost $25 each, but one of my local shops
called them a dud item, and put them up for $10 each. I bought
the last three.  I have two of them in kegs, and the third I use
to oxygenate my wort.

Brian

 
 
 

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by Peter Mitche » Thu, 24 Jul 1997 04:00:00




<deletia>

Quote:

> I have carbonation stones in two of my kegs.  These attach to the
> a hose that is attached to the "IN" connector, inside the keg.
> I can carbonate a beer perfectly in about 20 minutes, by simply
> starting the CO2 at 1psi and every few minutes adding another
> 1psi of pressure, until I reach the desired pressure.

> Brian

Tell us more about this magical "carbonation stone"!

PM (I poured my first mug of foam from my new keg last night! Yum.)

 
 
 

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by Scott Murm » Fri, 25 Jul 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>CO2 from
>a keg won't reduce head stability or cause large bubbles in and of
>itself, but by vigorously shaking a keg to quickly carbonate it, you can
>break up some of the medium length proteins which improve head
>stability.

I would view this with extreme skepticism.  It takes about 130F in a
mash tun to accomplish protein breakdown.  I would doubt that you can
impart a comparable amount of energy by simply shaking your keg.

SM

 
 
 

The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by Darrel » Fri, 25 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:



> <deletia>

> <more deletia>

> Tell us more about this magical "carbonation stone"!

> PM (I poured my first mug of foam from my new keg last night! Yum.)

I don't know about magic stones, but try venting the pressure on your
keg back down to around 5 - 10 psi  after it is carbonated, before you
pour, and you should keep the foam out of your mug (and off the
ceiling!).

--
Darrell Garton
Montrose, CO

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The Ins and Outs of Kegging

Post by Darrel » Fri, 25 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> You shouldn't.  If you end up getting more pressure in the keg than
> what
> the regulator is putting out you'll get backflow to the regulator and
> may
> damage it if there's no check valve.
> --
> heubs

(snip)

Quote:
> > Through trial and error, I've figured out my question concerning CO2

> > pressure.  So that's what that big***on the regulator is for.
> > Instructions on the container would have been nice.

> > I still don't understand why I should reverse my use of the in and
> out
> > valves on the keg.

> > Lowell

FWIW, I read somewhere that for a "cask conditioned" beer you could
reverse the ports on a corny keg, then prime it and lay it on its side.
This would allow for a "gravity" feed, eliminating the need for a CO2
cylinder, supposedly simulating the live ales of England.

This may be where you got the notion to reverse the valves.
--
Darrell Garton
Montrose, CO

**  Just drink it! **

Sorry for the bogus "Reply to:" remove the "S-P-A-M"

Unsolicited advertizing has necessitated diversionary measures.

***WARNING***
Pursuant to US Code of Federal Regulations Title 47
Section 64.1200, any and all unsolicited commercial E-mail
sent to this address is subject to a download and archival
fee in the amount of US$500.  Criminal penalties may also
apply.

E-mailing denotes acceptance of these terms.

And for you automated email spammers out there,
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the Federal Communications Commission: