Steam Beer question

Steam Beer question

Post by John Richards » Fri, 06 Mar 1998 04:00:00





Quote:
>I'm planning on brewing the "Sun Has Left Us On Time" steam beer extract
>recipe from Charlie P's NCJOHB book.  His recipe states that the beer will
>improve if secondary-fermented for about 2-3 weekd at 50 degrees F.  My
>questions are:

>(1)  How much difference does this cool conditioning really make?  What if I
>just secondary-fermented at room temperature (65-70 F)?

Conditioning temperatures make a difference, as do fermentation
temperatures.  Scots ale, for example, cannot be fermented warmer than
60F, preferably 5-10 degrees cooler.  California Common Beer _should_
be fermented cool...60-62F.  Anchor ferments at 62F and conditions for
3 weeks at 50F, not the <36F used  for lagers.

Quote:
>(2)  What would happen it I were to condition the beer in my ba***t
>refrigerator at 40 F?

Too cold.  Not to style.  What if you were to cool it down in your
ba***t with, for example, wet towels?  Or, better, get an external
thermostat for your fridge and keep it at 50F.  Just remember...the
U.S. only has (can lay claim to) two distinct beer styles; California
Common and Cream Ale.  If you bastardize the style you lose the
meaning of a, potentially, great beer.

John

 
 
 

Steam Beer question

Post by Andrew Perro » Sat, 07 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:



> >I'm planning on brewing the "Sun Has Left Us On Time" steam beer extract
> >recipe from Charlie P's NCJOHB book.  His recipe states that the beer will
> >improve if secondary-fermented for about 2-3 weekd at 50 degrees F.  My
> >questions are:

> >(1)  How much difference does this cool conditioning really make?  What if I
> >just secondary-fermented at room temperature (65-70 F)?

> Conditioning temperatures make a difference, as do fermentation
> temperatures.  Scots ale, for example, cannot be fermented warmer than
> 60F, preferably 5-10 degrees cooler.  California Common Beer _should_
> be fermented cool...60-62F.  Anchor ferments at 62F and conditions for
> 3 weeks at 50F, not the <36F used  for lagers.

> >(2)  What would happen it I were to condition the beer in my ba***t
> >refrigerator at 40 F?

> Too cold.  Not to style.  What if you were to cool it down in your
> ba***t with, for example, wet towels?  Or, better, get an external
> thermostat for your fridge and keep it at 50F.  Just remember...the
> U.S. only has (can lay claim to) two distinct beer styles; California
> Common and Cream Ale.  If you bastardize the style you lose the
> meaning of a, potentially, great beer.

> John

Isn't Cream Ale a Canadian style?  For the longest time I always heard it
referred to as such but in the last year or two that seems to have changed.  
Just wondering.

Andrew Perron


 
 
 

Steam Beer question

Post by John Richards » Sun, 08 Mar 1998 04:00:00




Quote:

>Thanks for the pointers on making California Common beer to style.  Given my
>limited resources of a fridge which probably can't run as warm as 50F (plus,
>where would I put everything that's in the freezer now?), which secondary
>fermentation method would be truer to style, in the fridge at 40F, or in the
>ba***t at 65F?  How much additional cooling does the "wet towel" method
>provide?  And how would either method impact the beer's flavor (my yeast is
>Wyeast 2112 California Lager, if that helps).

If your ba***t is 65F, wet towels with a fan could bring the temp to
~50, I would think.  This would be _better_ than a 40F refrigerators,
IMHO.  Just one thought about style.  I brew, exclusively, British
ales.  I can make English ales all year, within reason, because
England is 10-15 degrees warmer than Scotland.  I can only make
_Scottish_ ale when I can ferment at 50-55F.  Because I don't ferment
in the refrigerators, I have to have a place that's 50 degrees.  Even
if I have all the "right" ingredients, I need low temperatures,
otherwise its just not true Scottish ale.  If you are limited to
temperatures above or below California beer guidelines, don't brew it
expecting it to be to style or to taste like what you want.  The beer
may taste great at 40F or 65F, but its not really brewed to style.
Even judges may not taste the difference (I may not), but you know it.
Make California beer at a time of year that you can condition by an
open window at 50F.  That's what I do with Scottish ale.  That 10-15
degree difference is noticeable.

John

 
 
 

Steam Beer question

Post by John Richards » Sun, 08 Mar 1998 04:00:00


On Fri, 06 Mar 1998 13:56:32 +0000, Andrew Perron

Quote:

>Isn't Cream Ale a Canadian style?  For the longest time I always heard it
>referred to as such but in the last year or two that seems to have changed.  
>Just wondering.

>Andrew Perron


Andrew,

I don't know.  That's just what I learned (that Cream Ale is
American).  But...isn't Canada American?  Don't forget...I didn't say
Cream Ale is a U.S. style, I said "American":)  I had a college
professor who taught "American" History.  He told the class, "Don't
forget, there's   North America, Central America, and South America.
Now, let's study American History."

John

 
 
 

Steam Beer question

Post by Jim Willenbeche » Sun, 08 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Gennessee Cream Ale has been served in the East Coast for over my life time and
that is a long time.
Jim

Quote:

> On Fri, 06 Mar 1998 13:56:32 +0000, Andrew Perron

> >Isn't Cream Ale a Canadian style?  For the longest time I always heard it
> >referred to as such but in the last year or two that seems to have changed.
> >Just wondering.

> >Andrew Perron

> Andrew,

> I don't know.  That's just what I learned (that Cream Ale is
> American).  But...isn't Canada American?  Don't forget...I didn't say
> Cream Ale is a U.S. style, I said "American":)  I had a college
> professor who taught "American" History.  He told the class, "Don't
> forget, there's   North America, Central America, and South America.
> Now, let's study American History."

> John

--
Crossfire Engineering Inc. and its divisions:
Crossfire Brewing Supplies, CEI Publications, &  KegMan Products
are located at "http://home.att.net/~beerengineer.crossfire".
Come and visit when you have the time.
We still offer Personal Web Pages for $25.00.
Our Business Web Pages also start at just $25.00.
Our prices include uploading to your URL site.

  vcard.vcf
< 1K Download
 
 
 

Steam Beer question

Post by Andrew Perro » Sun, 08 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> On Fri, 06 Mar 1998 13:56:32 +0000, Andrew Perron

> >Isn't Cream Ale a Canadian style?  For the longest time I always heard it
> >referred to as such but in the last year or two that seems to have changed.  
> >Just wondering.

> >Andrew Perron

> Andrew,

> I don't know.  That's just what I learned (that Cream Ale is
> American).  But...isn't Canada American?  Don't forget...I didn't say
> Cream Ale is a U.S. style, I said "American":)  I had a college
> professor who taught "American" History.  He told the class, "Don't
> forget, there's   North America, Central America, and South America.
> Now, let's study American History."

> John

Actually you did say U.S. style

to quote:

"Just remember...the
U.S. only has (can lay claim to) two distinct beer styles; California
Common and Cream Ale."

Andrew Perron

 
 
 

Steam Beer question

Post by Andrew Perro » Sun, 08 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
> Gennessee Cream Ale has been served in the East Coast for over my life time and
> that is a long time.
> Jim

Sleeman Cream Ale was formulated January 5th 1895, I don't think you're that old!

Quote:

> > On Fri, 06 Mar 1998 13:56:32 +0000, Andrew Perron

> > >Isn't Cream Ale a Canadian style?  For the longest time I always heard it
> > >referred to as such but in the last year or two that seems to have changed.
> > >Just wondering.

> > >Andrew Perron

> > Andrew,

> > I don't know.  That's just what I learned (that Cream Ale is
> > American).  But...isn't Canada American?  Don't forget...I didn't say
> > Cream Ale is a U.S. style, I said "American":)  I had a college
> > professor who taught "American" History.  He told the class, "Don't
> > forget, there's   North America, Central America, and South America.
> > Now, let's study American History."

> > John

> --
> Crossfire Engineering Inc. and its divisions:
> Crossfire Brewing Supplies, CEI Publications, &  KegMan Products
> are located at "http://home.att.net/~beerengineer.crossfire".
> Come and visit when you have the time.
> We still offer Personal Web Pages for $25.00.
> Our Business Web Pages also start at just $25.00.
> Our prices include uploading to your URL site.

> --------------3F4033B099EED7EA117169D4
> Content-Type: text/x-vcard; charset=us-ascii; name="vcard.vcf"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> Content-Description: Card for Jim Willenbecher
> Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="vcard.vcf"

> begin:          vcard
> fn:             Jim Willenbecher
> n:              Willenbecher;Jim

> x-mozilla-cpt:  ;0
> x-mozilla-html: FALSE
> version:        2.1
> end:            vcard

> --------------3F4033B099EED7EA117169D4--

Andrew Perron

 
 
 

Steam Beer question

Post by Lillest » Tue, 10 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>>Can anyone please give me pointers on how to reduce the amount of trub

introduced into my primary fermenter during siphoning?<<

Don't try so hard. All this whirlpooling/ choir boy/ etc. stuff might work for
some, but I prefer a bizarrely easy method: I pour the wort through a strainer.

I don't know if you're an extract or a grain brewer, but I suspect this will
work better if you're using extract. Here's what I do:

--Cool the wort FIRST. I do a partial boil (usually 3 gallons). I cool the wort
to around 100 degrees or so by putting it in a bathtub full of cold water (pot
covered, but cover slightly ajar to release steam). Takes about 20 minutes or
so to cool down.

--Use a small sanitized pot with a handle as a "bail." Bail out the wort from
the big pot, then pour it through a strainer and funnel into your fermenter.
You can buy funnels with strainers in them at homebrew stores, or you can buy
wire strainers (they work better) at most cookware stores. Bonus: The wire
strainers are made to sit over the tops of small pots; they fit fine over the
tops of larger funnels as well!

This eliminates probably 80 percent of all trub. You don't have to worry about
splashing/sloshing the wort at this stage, either, because it's relatively
cooled and you need to get oxygen in it anyway in preparation for fermentation.

Also re: Siphoning: I had all sorts of siphoning problems at first. Now, I
ferment in glass carboys and use carboy caps. They have two holes in them. You
put a racking cane through one and suspend it just above the trub; blow into
the other hole and you'll start a siphon quickly and easily. It's also easy to
leave the trub in place as well this way.

I do not siphon from the brewpot to the fermentation carboy, though: I use the
above method.

 
 
 

Steam Beer question

Post by Dan Schult » Tue, 10 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Can anyone please give me pointers on how to reduce the amount of trub
> introduced into my primary fermenter during siphoning?  I brewed a batch of
> steam beer Saturday night, and everything went great all the way from starting
> the yeast culture on Wednesday, all the way through cooling the wort; then I
> walked through the gates of siphoning Hell:

I just use a strainer to strain out most of the trub. The remaining trub
will help yeast growth by providing nutrients to the yeast. If you rack
to a secondary as soon as the primary fermentation slows, the trub in
the primary will be locked under the yeast cake. Since you already pitch
up to 1 quart starters, the short 2 or 3 days in the primary won't allow
the trub to impart detectable off flavors to the beer (IMHO).

Quote:

> Now a question about using wet towels with a fan to cool my secondary
> fermenter:



> > If your ba***t is 65F, wet towels with a fan could bring the temp to
> > ~50, I would think.

> It's hard to imagine getting that much cooling from wet towels and a fan, but
> I'll try it.  How much ventilation is required?  I have to keep the fermenter
> in a small ba***t closet to protect the brew from my inquisitive
> 2-and-4-year-old children (I have a hard enough time keeping *ants* away,
> attracted by the sweet smell of fermenting wort exuding from the air lock!).

> TIA...

> --
> Bill Goodman
> Olney, MD

The "-50" was meant to read 50 degrees. The wet towell wrap works by
evaporating of the warmer water molecules leaving the colder ones
behind. The result is a drop in the temperature. Exactly the same
principle as in the "Wind Chill Factor" that weather people use. The
efficiency will be dependend on the temperature and the humidity (mostly
humidity). Thus in Malaysia where you have 80% humidity and 80F temps,
you may only gets a couple of degrees of temp. drop. In the deserts of
So Cal you may get 20 degrees of drop.

The ventilation is thus improtant in order to disperse the humidity. If
your closet is sealed it will quickly reach 90% humidity and the
function of the wet wrap will diminish. The wet wrap is less likely to
saturate a larger room.

Good Brewing,
-Dan

 
 
 

Steam Beer question

Post by Lillest » Tue, 10 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>>Just remember...the U.S. only has (can lay claim to) two distinct beer

styles; California Common and Cream Ale.  If you bastardize the style you lose
the meaning of a, potentially, great beer.<<<

Beer geek alert! This ain't a contest. If you like it, it's a great beer. Fight
the madness!