Dave Line and malto-dextrin

Dave Line and malto-dextrin

Post by Ken Sente » Tue, 30 Nov 1999 04:00:00



I'm getting together some ideas for a new brew and I looked through
Dave Line's book 'Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy'.  I found one
recipe for a beer that I drank a while back and thought I'd have a
crack at it.

One of the ingredients is 500g (1 lb) of 'Brewing Sugar' which he
explains in the beginning is malto-dextrin.  This seems like a lot to
me.  I've looked at lots of recipes in books and on the 'net and most
of the time malto-dextrin is used in 115g (4oz.) or 225g (8oz.)
quantities.  I know that malto-dextrin is not fully fermentable and is
used mostly to promote body/mouthfeel.  Does anybody have any
experience brewing with this much?  Exactly how fermentable is
malto-dextrin?

The recipe (shown below) is for a 25 (6.5 US gal) liter batch.

Ruddles County Bitter
3.9 kg ( 8.5 lbs)  Pale Ale Malt
0.25 kg (0.5 lbs) Crystal Malt
0.5 kg (1.1 lbs) Brewing Sugar
30 g (1oz) Molasses
10 g (2 tsp) Brewers Caramel

60 g Fuggles hops (boil)
45 g WGV hops (boil)
15 g WGV hops (flavor)

Cheers,
Ken

 
 
 

Dave Line and malto-dextrin

Post by Alema » Fri, 03 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
>One of the ingredients is 500g (1 lb) of 'Brewing Sugar' which he
>explains in the beginning is malto-dextrin.

NO, NO, NO, NO, NO!

What he means is ordinary Glucose, or dextrose, Or as I normally use
Table sugar! Malto-dextrin as you already know is something TOTALY
different.

Quote:
>Exactly how fermentable is
>malto-dextrin?

IIRC about 25%

Quote:

>The recipe (shown below) is for a 25 (6.5 US gal) liter batch.

>Ruddles County Bitter

And A damn fine clone it is too!

--
Wassail !

The Scurrilous Aleman

Schwarzbad Lager Braueri, Blackpool, Lancashire, UK

Reply to Aleman at brewmaster dot demon dot co dot uk

ICQ 46254361

 
 
 

Dave Line and malto-dextrin

Post by Ken Sente » Sun, 05 Dec 1999 04:00:00


On Thu, 2 Dec 1999 20:59:46 +0000, Aleman

Quote:


>>One of the ingredients is 500g (1 lb) of 'Brewing Sugar' which he
>>explains in the beginning is malto-dextrin.

>NO, NO, NO, NO, NO!

>What he means is ordinary Glucose, or dextrose, Or as I normally use
>Table sugar! Malto-dextrin as you already know is something TOTALY
>different.

Something told me that this wasn't right. 500g of malto-dextrin is a
lot!  But, it does clearly state in the book in the section on sugar
(p.18) that "Much better is to buy Brewing Sugar (Malto-dextrin) from
your homebrew specialist, and use this in the same quantities".  Is
this an error in the book?

Quote:

>>The recipe (shown below) is for a 25 (6.5 US gal) liter batch.

>>Ruddles County Bitter

>And A damn fine clone it is too!

Have you every brewed this one or any other one in the book? If so,
how did they turn out? Were they close to the originals?

Maybe you can help me out with one of the ingredients. What is
Brewer's caramel? Is it used for coloring? I was going to exclude it
from my version, figuring that 10ml wouldn't make much of a difference
in a 25L batch.

Cheers,
Ken

 
 
 

Dave Line and malto-dextrin

Post by cora » Mon, 06 Dec 1999 04:00:00


Just for the record:

Dextrose is corn sugar.

Maltodextrins: Sugars derived from the hydrolysis of corn starch are known as
maltodextrins provided that they have a dextrose equivalent (D.E.)of 20 or
less. D.E. refers to the degree of polymerization resulting from the corn
starch hydrolysis. These products have many functions. They serve as bulking
agents whereby they add body without much sweetness.

Regular white granulated sugar is sucrose. Sugar occurs in greatest quantities
in sugar cane and sugar beets from which it is separated for commercial use.

I have always used corn sugar for my brewing and have never had a problem.  It
is a bit more expensive than sucrose, but the first (and last) time I tried
using sucrose, it made a VERY big difference in the brew.


Quote:

>On Thu, 2 Dec 1999 20:59:46 +0000, Aleman


>>>One of the ingredients is 500g (1 lb) of 'Brewing Sugar' which he
>>>explains in the beginning is malto-dextrin.

>>NO, NO, NO, NO, NO!

>>What he means is ordinary Glucose, or dextrose, Or as I normally use
>>Table sugar! Malto-dextrin as you already know is something TOTALY
>>different.

>Something told me that this wasn't right. 500g of malto-dextrin is a
>lot!  But, it does clearly state in the book in the section on sugar
>(p.18) that "Much better is to buy Brewing Sugar (Malto-dextrin) from
>your homebrew specialist, and use this in the same quantities".  Is
>this an error in the book?

>>>The recipe (shown below) is for a 25 (6.5 US gal) liter batch.

>>>Ruddles County Bitter

>>And A damn fine clone it is too!

>Have you every brewed this one or any other one in the book? If so,
>how did they turn out? Were they close to the originals?

>Maybe you can help me out with one of the ingredients. What is
>Brewer's caramel? Is it used for coloring? I was going to exclude it
>from my version, figuring that 10ml wouldn't make much of a difference
>in a 25L batch.

>Cheers,
>Ken

 
 
 

Dave Line and malto-dextrin

Post by Alema » Mon, 06 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
>Something told me that this wasn't right. 500g of malto-dextrin is a
>lot!  But, it does clearly state in the book in the section on sugar
>(p.18) that "Much better is to buy Brewing Sugar (Malto-dextrin) from
>your homebrew specialist, and use this in the same quantities".  Is
>this an error in the book?

The original BBLTYB was written in 1978, and has recently been revised.
I've check my original copy and the brewing sugar is a replacement for
the 500g of invert sugar that was common in those times. Having checked
the new edition, I can only say that the editor has definitely made a
mistake. The brewing sugar that is sold over here in white bags is 100%
glucose and not Malto-dextrin.

The editor is much more well known for his winemaking knowledge and
expertise that he is for beer making, (nuff said!)

Quote:
>Have you every brewed this one or any other one in the book? If so,
>how did they turn out? Were they close to the originals?

Ruddles used to a favourite of mine up until a few years ago, a really
nice malty brew, but either my palate has changed or the beer has, and
I'm not really that fond of it any more. The recipe does come very
close, as do many of the others I have tried over the years. One
important thing I should point out is that Dave Line was rather
optimistic on the efficiency of his sparge, (like 100%!). You may want
to take that into account when brewing the beer.

Quote:
>Maybe you can help me out with one of the ingredients. What is
>Brewer's caramel? Is it used for coloring?

Its an artificial darkening agent! No place for it in a well crafted
beer. IIRC Dave recommends gravy browning If you can't get Brewers
Caramel. I would recommend a couple of ounces of Roast barley instead

Quote:
>I was going to exclude it
>from my version, figuring that 10ml wouldn't make much of a difference
>in a 25L batch.

Good Move, You may be interested in the following recipe I found in
Graham Wheelers Book Brew Your Own Real Ale At Home

For 23 Litres At 1050, 38IBu's Assuming 70% efficiency and 10% wort Loss

4650g Pale Malt (85%)
 220g Crystal Malt (4%)

Mash at 67C for 90 - 120 Minutes then sparge and boil with

600g Maltose Syrup (or 480g of Glucose / Dextrose or Table Sugar)
31g Challenger Hops (7.7% AA) Start Of Boil
30g Northdown Hops (8.0% AA) Start Of Boil

and

20g Goldings for the last 15 minutes along with
1tsp of Irish moss

Try and use a nice fruity yeast, but not 1968 its a bit too fruity, 1084
might be suitable

--
Wassail !

The Scurrilous Aleman

Schwarzbad Lager Braueri, Blackpool, Lancashire, UK

Reply to Aleman at brewmaster dot demon dot co dot uk

ICQ 46254361