Novice question about straining

Novice question about straining

Post by Jim Basa » Wed, 01 Apr 1992 06:53:42



As a novice brewer, I am currently using strictly extracts with additional
dry malt and hop pellets.  While making my last batch, I decided to
strain the wort just to see what happened.  I was under the assumption
that straining was not required for extract brewing.  However, I was
amazed to find the strainer (a large one) completely clogged with mud-like
gunk.  What was this stuff????  My best guess was that it was undisolved dry
malt.

For this particular recipe, I used a 4lb can of Edme Bitter Ale extract and
two pounds of dry malt.  I boiled in 2 gallons of water for 60 minutes.

All comments about the use of straining for extract brewing would be
appreciated.  I imaging that if I filtered out malt that would have disolved
when I topped off my fermenter, I just screwed up a batch of beer.

thanks.

jim

--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jim Basara
     uunet!ssdc!jbasara                "All the other nations are drinking

                                       Barry Manilow." - Dave Barry

 
 
 

Novice question about straining

Post by Jeff Brendl » Wed, 01 Apr 1992 16:37:32


It is possible that you were able to partially strain out some of the proteins
that were coagulated by the action of hop resins during a nice long boil.  It
would be benefically to remove most of these since they provide a location for
bacteria to grow later in the fermentation and can lead to off flavors if they
are oxidized.  I would hope that this was not undissolved malt extract or you
will have to do some work on your brewing procedures!

Cheers!
Jeff B.
PennState Homebrewer

 
 
 

Novice question about straining

Post by Mike Harr » Sun, 05 Apr 1992 06:33:30




|>
|>  JB >strain the wort just to see what happened.  I was under the assumption
|>  JB >that straining was not required for extract brewing.  However, I was
|>  JB >amazed to find the strainer (a large one) completely clogged with
|>  JB >mud-like gunk.  What was this stuff????  My best guess was that it was
|>  JB >undisolved dry malt.
|>
|> Who said you don't need to strain with extract brewing?  It all depends on
|> what is in your extract and what you add.  For instance, if you add hop
|> pellets, you will be able to strain them out.  I have also seen things
|> floating in cans of hopped extract that looked like leaves.
|>
|>  JB >For this particular recipe, I used a 4lb can of Edme Bitter Ale extract
|>  JB >and two pounds of dry malt.  I boiled in 2 gallons of water for 60
|>  JB >minutes.
|>
|> A little extra water wouldn't hurt, if you are worrying about dissolving
|> everything.  
|>
|>  JB >All comments about the use of straining for extract brewing would be
|>  JB >appreciated.  I imaging that if I filtered out malt that would
|>  JB >have disolved when I topped off my fermenter, I just screwed up a batch of
|>  JB >beer.
|>
|> As far as I know, even with all-extract brewing you can get hot break and
|> cold break precipitates as well as have dissolved hop pellets or the like.
|> Whatever you pour into your fermenter will fall to the bottom and form the
|> trub, some of which is not beneficial to your beer.

        I started a batch of IPA last night - extract based with crystal
        and toasted malts as adjuncts. The hot and cold breaks were clearly
        visible. Unfortunately, I forgot the Irish moss at the end of the
        boil. I strained it through a nylon mesh fruit bag and strained
        out several cups of junk. This surprised me as it was a slow pour
        and everything *looked* like it was going to pass through the mesh.
        I'm glad it didn't!

        Irish moss or not, I'm straining all my batches from now on. I use
        a nylon mesh fruit bag designed to fit my seven gallon plastic
        fermenter. It handily fits over the rim and doesn't have to be
        held.

regards, Mike