mini-mash

mini-mash

Post by mik » Fri, 22 Feb 2002 11:05:10



I have done several extract recipes out of Clone Brews and am going to
do my first mini-mash.  do I put all of the grains in a bag and keep
them in the water untill it begins to boil and pour some 170f water
over them like I have done in the past.  Or do i need to follow the
all grain technique of mashing and sparging loose grains.

thank you

 
 
 

mini-mash

Post by Glenn L » Fri, 22 Feb 2002 11:59:44



Quote:
> I have done several extract recipes out of Clone Brews and am going to
> do my first mini-mash.  do I put all of the grains in a bag and keep
> them in the water untill it begins to boil and pour some 170f water
> over them like I have done in the past.  Or do i need to follow the
> all grain technique of mashing and sparging loose grains.

> thank you

To do a mini-mash, you will want to replace a portion of the extract with
grain.  So, you will need to mash and sparge the grains.  The steeping
procedure is good for the darker specialty grains, but I don't think it
works well in a true mini-mash.

 
 
 

mini-mash

Post by Mike Uchim » Fri, 22 Feb 2002 13:57:00


You should use less water (ideally about 1.25 quarts per lb of grain),
and you really need to control the temperature better (hold it between
150F and 155F, for an hour).  Bringing it almost to a boil without
stopping in the 150-155F range will denature (kill) the enzymes, and you
won't get very good conversion.

I imagine you could still do the whole process in the grain bag, but
this will make it difficult to ensure that the mash is thoroughly mixed,
and at an even temperature.  If you're not planning on setting up an
actual lauter tun, my suggestion would be to mash them loose, then
transfer them to the grain bag for your "sparge" (the part where you
pour the 170F water over them).

--

Quote:

> I have done several extract recipes out of Clone Brews and am going to
> do my first mini-mash.  do I put all of the grains in a bag and keep
> them in the water untill it begins to boil and pour some 170f water
> over them like I have done in the past.  Or do i need to follow the
> all grain technique of mashing and sparging loose grains.

> thank you

 
 
 

mini-mash

Post by sholbr.. » Sat, 23 Feb 2002 12:44:38



Quote:
>I have done several extract recipes out of Clone Brews and am going to
>do my first mini-mash.  do I put all of the grains in a bag and keep
>them in the water untill it begins to boil and pour some 170f water
>over them like I have done in the past.  Or do i need to follow the
>all grain technique of mashing and sparging loose grains.

>thank you

I did my first mini mash last weekend.  My technique was to put the
grain bag in a small cooler and pour 158f water over it and agitate
the bag until I assumed the grain was well wetted.  I used about 1.25
quarts per pound of grain.  I stuck my temperature probe in to the
grain bed and  closed the lid.  Temps settled at 156 and dropped to
153 in about 40 minutes.  Then I pulled the bag and set in a collander
over the brew pot and poured the runnings over it and repeated the
soak  twice with 170 degree water for a few minutes (my weak attempt
at a "mashout").  There was still residual "goodies" coming out , but
I had collected my 2.5 gallon volume.  I was trying to achieve a batch
sparge with out having a real mash tun or false bottom.  The results
are still in primary (should have transferred to secondary today,
judging by the airlock) but look and taste promising.  I had intended
to use a round cooler with a spigot, but it had some gunk in there
that I couldn't get clean enough to suit me.  So I used a square
cooler with no spigot.

Another suggestion is to check for a homebrew club in your area.   I
went to the LHBS and watched the "brew in" and met some of the people
in the Foam Rangers.  I am now a member and can't reccomend it highly
enough.  I have been offered use of equipment, brewing advice (by
people who made beer I liked!), good deals on used equipment and more
tastes of homebrew than I ever imagined. The monthly meeting was well
worth the annual dues, and there are still ten more to go!!  

Jason

 
 
 

mini-mash

Post by Greg Ber » Sun, 24 Feb 2002 13:03:37


Quote:

>I have done several extract recipes out of Clone Brews and am going to
>do my first mini-mash.

Here's an article on partial-mash brewing that I wrote four my
homebrew club newsletter.   It's not the only way to do it, but it
works.  Hopefully, it should answer your questions:

Extract Brewers Anonymous
or Partial-Mash Brewing the Easy Way
by Greg B.

My name is Greg and I'm an extract brewer.  Except for those times I
get to use the club all-grain system, all my home brewing is extract
based - and I still compete and win ribbons!   But if there's one
regret I have about brewing, it's that I didn't try a partial-mash
(AKA mini-mash) much sooner.   It just sounded like it would be
something difficult but the truth is that if you're brewing extract
with specialty grains, you can partial mash with very little more
time, effort and equipment than you're using now, even if you're
brewing on the stove top.

The main difference is that a partial-mash uses a base malt in place
of some of the extract.   This makes the partial-mash approach a
natural for recipes that require more or less than the standard 6
pounds of extract.    A good example is an English Dark Mild.   The
style guidelines call for an OG range of 1-033-1.038 but 6 pounds of
liquid extract in a 5 gallon batch will result in an OG of 1.044,
which is too high.   On the other hand, 3 pounds of LME only give an
OG of 1.022   Instead of using dry malt extract to make up the
difference, you can mash a couple of pounds of  pale malt to get the
OG you want.

Calculating how much pale malt you use doesn't need to involve a lot
of math.   An easy rule of thumb for partial-mash brewing is to use
about 1/3 more grain than you would use extract.   For the Mild, this
means using 2 lbs of pale malt, since you'd have to add about 1.5 lbs.
of DME to your 3 lbs of extract syrup to hit a target gravity of
1.036.   You can worry about more precise calculations after you try a
few batches and refine your brewing technique.   I use the online Beer
Recipator spreadsheet to perform the calculations for me:
http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/recipator   Once you've figured out
how much pale malt to use, you'll add it to the same specialty malts
your extract recipe calls for.   You might need to get a bigger grain
bag, but that's the only extra equipment you need.  

Now here's the big secret: mashing is just like steeping, you just
have to pay a little more attention to temperature and time.   Using
your brewpot, start heating about 1-1.5 gallons of water (1.5 quarts
per lb. of grain.)  At the same time, pre-heat your oven to 175
degrees.   If your brewpot is too big to fit in the oven, you can mash
on the burners, it's just a little more work.    When the water in the
brewpot reaches 155 degrees, turn off the heat and add your grains in
the grain bag.   After about 5 minutes take another temperature
reading - it should be in the 140s but that's OK, too low is better
than too high.   Start your burner and bring the temperature back up
to 152.   Once you hit 152, move the brewpot to your oven and lower
the oven thermostat to 150.     Now set your timer for 60 minutes and
relax.   The oven should keep the water temperature at your 152 degree
target temperature.   You can check the temperature every 10-15
minutes and adjust accordingly.    That's mashing.  Easy, isn't it?

The next step will be sparging your grain. Wait a minute, what the
hell is sparging anyway?   The answer - it's rinsing the grain with
hot water.    About 10-15 minutes before the mash is complete, use
another pot to heat another 1.5 gallons to 170 degrees.    The one I
use only holds 1.5 gallons, so I use a little less.    When the timer
goes off, move the brewpot back to the stove top, carefully lift your
grain bag out of the water and let it drain for a little while.   Once
most of the water is drained out, you'll need a way to hold the grain
out of the water while you sparge it.   I use a colander that fits
across the top of my brewpot but a big strainer will work as well.
Once the grain bag is out of the water, use a measuring cup to scoop
up the sparge water and pour it slowly over the grain so it runs
through into the brew pot.

Once you've poured all the sparge water through the grain, and all the
water has run through, you can remove the colander from the top of the
brewpot.   From here on it's just same as any extract batch:  stir in
the extract syrup, bring your water level to whatever you're used to
boiling and go to it.  Believe me, the improvement in your beer will
make you glad you tried it!