Brewer's Best

Brewer's Best

Post by Gary Ail » Sat, 26 Jul 1997 04:00:00



Hello, New Brewer here!

Let me first thank you for all the spam free brewing information!  It was =
this group that made me seek out a home brewing supply house in my area.
So I hit the yellow pages, and in Pittsburgh, PA, there were only 3 places=
 listed under homebrewing supplies, so I picked the one closest to home.

I spoke to the man at the store for a long time, and I'm really glad he wa=
s willing to explain what brewing entailed (afterall, I was buying no matt=
er what).  So I did purchase the Brewer's Best starter kit and selected Ir=
ish Stout as my first Batch.

Reading through the booklet was very informative, and now I know what the =
hell everyone is talking about here!  I guess now the only thing is to sta=
rt boiling and fermenting and fermenting and bottling.

Now the question:  The bottles he sold were pretty expensive.  He recommen=
ded buying some beer in returnables or Grolsch type bottles and cleaning t=
hem immediately.  I've been buying kegs at my local dist. for so long that=
 I'm sure he'll slide me all the "used" returnables I could ever want, but=
 I'm afraid that they may have set around for awhile.

Would a dishwasher be an acceptable first step in cleaning returnable bott=
les?  I also read the instructions for soaking and the recommended solutio=
n... What if anything should I do?  It seems that sterilazation is the pri=
me step in the entire brewing process, and I don't want to ruin my first b=
atch with contaminated bottles.

... I'm as innocent as a new=ADlaid egg.

...This copy of ProBoard has been unregistered for 234 days!

 
 
 

Brewer's Best

Post by xjta.. » Sun, 27 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hello, New Brewer here!

<SNIP>

Quote:
> Would a dishwasher be an acceptable first step in cleaning returnable bottles?  I also read the instructions for soaking and the recommended solution... What if anything should I do?  It seems that sterilazation is the prime step in the entire brewing process, and I don't want to ruin my first batch with contaminated bottles.

A dishwasher would be an acceptable SECOND, but probably unnecessary,
step in sanitizing.  DO NOT USE SOAP in
the dishwasher though.

Buy a JET bottle washer.  Your local supplier will be able to get you
one for $8 to $9.

First JET spray the used bottles, then soak them in a bleach solution
for an hour if they don't have a bunch of crud in the bottom, soak
overnight if they do.  Then JET spray them again.  If you
aren't going to bottle soon, cover the tops of the bottles with small
pieces of aluminum foil and store.
Or you can simply put them in a box and THEN run through the dishwasher
W/O soap when you are ready to boil.
Use the heated dry setting also.

===========
Pease click here to reply, or you will have to remove the leading X from
my address.


 
 
 

Brewer's Best

Post by Tim Mille » Sun, 27 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>If you aren't going to bottle soon, cover the tops of the bottles with
small
>pieces of aluminum foil and store.

Plastic wrap works well also.  Especially if the bottles are a little warm
from washing.
 
 
 

Brewer's Best

Post by jlheube » Mon, 28 Jul 1997 04:00:00




Hello, New Brewer here!

<SNIP OF INTRO>
Now the question:  The bottles he sold were pretty expensive.  He
recommended buying some beer in returnables or Grolsch type bottles and
cleaning them immediately.  I've been buying kegs at my local dist. for so
long that I'm sure he'll slide me all the "used" returnables I could ever
want, but I'm afraid that they may have set around for awhile.

Would a dishwasher be an acceptable first step in cleaning returnable
bottles?  I also read the instructions for soaking and the recommended
solution... What if anything should I do?  It seems that sterilazation is
the prime step in the entire brewing process, and I don't want to ruin my
first batch with contaminated bottles.

I've never used the dishwasher though many have with no problems.  I use a
good long soak in bleach water (unscented Clorox) and then good rinsing.
In your case (so to speak) you may get bottles with lots 'o gunk in them.
I'd recommend the bleach soak and a thorough bottle brushing.  Once this
first cleaning is done you should be able to use the dishwasher.  
--
heubs

Spammers forced me into this. Real responses...remove you know what.

 
 
 

Brewer's Best

Post by John Vaug » Mon, 28 Jul 1997 04:00:00




Quote:
> Hello, New Brewer here!

<SNIP>

Quote:
> Now the question:  The bottles he sold were pretty expensive.  He recommen=
> ded buying some beer in returnables or Grolsch type bottles and cleaning t=
> hem immediately.  I've been buying kegs at my local dist. for so long that=
>  I'm sure he'll slide me all the "used" returnables I could ever want, but=
>  I'm afraid that they may have set around for awhile.

> Would a dishwasher be an acceptable first step in cleaning returnable bott=
> les?  I also read the instructions for soaking and the recommended solutio=
> n... What if anything should I do?  It seems that sterilazation is the pri=
> me step in the entire brewing process, and I don't want to ruin my first b=
> atch with contaminated bottles.

> ... I'm as innocent as a new=ADlaid egg.

> ...This copy of ProBoard has been unregistered for 234 days!

First, get a bottle brush.  Take the used bottles and soak them in a
solution of water and dishwasher detergent or TSP.  Scrub the heck out of
them with the bottle brush then rinse using a Jet bottle washer or
something similar.  Your homebrew shop should have something like this in
stock.

Before bottling, sanitize using a bleach/water solution and rinse with
the Jet bottle washer or sanitize with an Iodophor/water solution and
drip dry.

BTW, you are not trying to sterilize the bottles, just sanitize them.

--
John Vaughn
Castroville, California

 
 
 

Brewer's Best

Post by Chris Overbee » Tue, 29 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Now the question:  The bottles he sold were pretty expensive.  He
>recommended buying some beer in returnables or Grolsch type bottles and
>cleaning them immediately.  I've been buying kegs at my local dist. for
>so long that I'm sure he'll slide me all the "used" returnables I could
>ever want, but I'm afraid that they may have set around for awhile.

I would not use the dishwasher for the initial cleaning.  A good bottle
washer and bottle brush, and a couple hours are your best bet.  Cleaning
and sanitizing are not one and the same.  In order to sanitize, the
bottles should be clean upon inspection.

Quote:
> ...This copy of ProBoard has been unregistered for 234 days!

Register that darn software!  People make their living off the software
they write.
 
 
 

Brewer's Best

Post by Al Ar » Thu, 31 Jul 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hello, New Brewer here!

> <snip>
> Now the question:  The bottles he sold were pretty expensive.  He
> recommended buying some beer in returnables or Grolsch type bottles
> and cleaning them immediately.  I've been buying kegs at my local
> dist. for so long that I'm sure he'll slide me all the "used"
> returnables I could ever want, but I'm afraid that they may have set
> around for awhile.

> Would a dishwasher be an acceptable first step in cleaning returnable
> bottles?  I also read the instructions for soaking and the recommended
> solution... What if anything should I do?  It seems that sterilazation
> is the prime step in the entire brewing process, and I don't want to
> ruin my first batch with contaminated bottles.

My suggestion:

1. Before using any "used" bottle, use a bottle brush to get out any
gunk that might be in it.

2. Soak the bottles in either a bleach solution, or a concentrated
one-step solution.

3. Run them through the dishwasher on the heat-dry cycle and allow them
to completely cool before removing.  Then cover with foil or plastic
wrap.

For future batches, I've found that step #3 is the only one necessary.
It's worked like a charm every time.

Cheers!
Al
--
******************************************
Al Arb

http://www.infinet.com/~harb/al.html
http://www.infinet.com/~harb/homebrew.html

Life is short, relax, have a homebrew!
******************************************

 
 
 

Brewer's Best

Post by Cecil A. Galbrait » Mon, 11 Aug 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hello, New Brewer here!

> Let me first thank you for all the spam free brewing information!  It was this group that made me seek out a home brewing supply house in my area.
> So I hit the yellow pages, and in Pittsburgh, PA, there were only 3 places listed under homebrewing supplies, so I picked the one closest to home.

> I spoke to the man at the store for a long time, and I'm really glad he was willing to explain what brewing entailed (afterall, I was buying no matter what).  So I did purchase the Brewer's Best starter kit and selected Irish Stout as my first Batch.

> Reading through the booklet was very informative, and now I know what the hell everyone is talking about here!  I guess now the only thing is to start boiling and fermenting and fermenting and bottling.

> Now the question:  The bottles he sold were pretty expensive.  He recommended buying some beer in returnables or Grolsch type bottles and cleaning them immediately.  I've been buying kegs at my local dist. for so long that I'm sure he'll slide me all the "used" returnables I could ever want, but I'm afraid that they may have set around for awhile.

> Would a dishwasher be an acceptable first step in cleaning returnable bottles?  I also read the instructions for soaking and the recommended solution... What if anything should I do?  It seems that sterilazation is the prime step in the entire brewing process, and I don't want to ruin my first batch with contaminated bottles.

> ... I'm as innocent as a new-laid egg.

> ...This copy of ProBoard has been unregistered for 234 days!

You made a good choice with Brewer's Best...

Get dark brown bottles from your local distributor. I found that my own
gives a $1.50 for a deposit return to the customer per case and that he
will give them to me for the same $1.50.

Try to avoid bottles with metallic labels. They can be a paint to soak
off. As a matter of fact, if you can get returnable foreign bottles,
since Germany and the rest of Europe tend to be very ecology minded, you
will find that the labels will just "float" off of their bottles.

As far as cleaning them goes, I would do the soap and water thing of
course, and get yourself one of those brass bent-tube bottle cleaners.
Those things are a wonder to behold. Also get yourself some of the
iodine based cleaner (cheap) and soak the bottles in it for a few
minutes each before their *first* use. Run them thru the dishwasher,
neck down, with a full heat dry using gel dishwasher soap (no particles)
and bottle away.

After the first time, a simple rinsing immediately upon pouring and a
dishwasher cycle will be enough.

I know there are people who insist on being fanatical about cleanliness,
and that's good up to a point. But, bear in mind that you're sanitizing,
not sterilizing and that you're not working in a clean room. Beyond a
certain point, you're wasting your time.

Enjoy and brew.

Cecil
--
Cecil Galbraith

Free programmer's utilities and MFC tips at
http://www.concentric.net/~cgalbrai

 
 
 

Brewer's Best

Post by Thom Middlesta » Wed, 13 Aug 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>Would a dishwasher be an acceptable first step in cleaning returnable bott=
>les?  I also read the instructions for soaking and the recommended solutio=
>n... What if anything should I do?  It seems that sterilazation is the pri=
>me step in the entire brewing process, and I don't want to ruin my first b=
>atch with contaminated bottles.

What I did, and it worked fine: My first bottles I got from a local
distributor and local bar. They were full of all kinds of crap. I went
through several steps that was quite a hassle, but you only need to do
it once. After that you just make sure you triple rinse after
drinking.

#1---In a large cooler, soak in warm water and ammonia. This loosen
the ***inside, and will remove the labels.

#2---Wash the outsides of bottles to remove the softened glue residue
and with a bottle washer, rinse the insides.

#3---In a large cooler again, soak in cold water and bleach to
sanitize. Rinse and dry.

#4---Any bottles with crud still in them, I fill individually with a
more concentrated bleach solution. Should come clean next rinse.

It's a dirty job, but somebody's gotta do it.

Thom
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                                   "All Grain, All The Time"    
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