Georgia House Bill 1383

Georgia House Bill 1383

Post by Mark Nelso » Wed, 16 Feb 2000 04:00:00



HB 1383 came to a vote today in the Ga House of Representatives and passed
126-42 (a full 35 votes more than we needed!)!!!!!  Now it's on to the
Senate!!!

Mark Nelson
Atlanta

BTW, there were two attempted amendments, one to add local choice for Sunday
sales and another to do away with the tax increases for stronger beer.  Both
were turned down by large margins.

 
 
 

Georgia House Bill 1383

Post by Michael Satterwhi » Thu, 17 Feb 2000 04:00:00


On Tue, 15 Feb 2000 21:26:20 -0800, kaelan

Quote:

>Wooohoooo!!!! almost there... Next we'll need to get GA to raise
>the amount of beer you can brew to the federal limit of 100
>gallons for a single *** and 200 for more than one *** in
>the household. This 50 gallons limit is crap..

That does sound absurd. Probably very hard to enforce, too. To phrase
this question where an answer can't incriminate:

Don't most homebrewers have a friend that would claim to have brewed
the 55th gallon (or in other states the 105th)?
---Michael
"Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom of speech."
www.weblore.com/soapbox
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Georgia House Bill 1383

Post by Mike Uchim » Thu, 17 Feb 2000 04:00:00


In at least some jurisdictions, the beer comes into existence -- in the
eyes of the law -- the instant the yeast is pitched.  Couple of years
ago, my homebrew club did a public homebrewing demonstration.  We were
told that while it is against the law to produce ***ic beverages on
public property, we would be fine from a legal standpoint as long as we
didn't pitch the yeast.  Never mind the fact that pitching the yeast
only accounts for a few seconds out of a process that takes several
hours; or the fact that there is an insignificant amount of ***
present for quite a while afterwards...

So anyway... if you happen to live in a jurisdiction where the above
definition of "when it becomes beer" applies, it seems to me that
there's an obvious out: When you go to brew that batch that's gonna put
you over the limit, just invite a friend over, and have him pitch the
yeast for you.  Just make sure your friend is at least 21... it is
probably illegal for an *** person to add yeast to a malt sugar
solution, because then they would technically be in possession of an
***ic beverage! :-)

(FWIW, I don't believe I've ever even come close to hitting the limit...
200 gallons is a *lot* of beer!)

--

Quote:

> That does sound absurd. Probably very hard to enforce, too. To phrase
> this question where an answer can't incriminate:

> Don't most homebrewers have a friend that would claim to have brewed
> the 55th gallon (or in other states the 105th)?

 
 
 

Georgia House Bill 1383

Post by John Paul Stoddar » Thu, 17 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Texas uses the same technicality about the yeast pitching also when its
comes to Public demonstrations. Texas also says that you can't give away
your homebrew because it has not been through a health inspection, but
they do have a provision that allows entries in competitions.
 
 
 

Georgia House Bill 1383

Post by h.. » Fri, 18 Feb 2000 04:00:00




Quote:
>Texas uses the same technicality about the yeast pitching also when its
>comes to Public demonstrations. Texas also says that you can't give away
>your homebrew because it has not been through a health inspection, but
>they do have a provision that allows entries in competitions.

In Las Vegas, our club was invited regularly to the chile cook-offs.
We tended to be one of the leading fund-raisers (if not number 1) at
nearly every one we went to.  We didn't sell the beer, but we accepted
donations for whatever the cuase in question was.  Most of us just
weren't too inclined to share our beer with anyone who hadn't made
a contribution :)

A couple of us got concerend about the possible ramifications, and
checked it out with the Sheriff.  We did have to make a change--they
wanted someone in our booth with a "TAM card" at all times--the card
issued after training bartenders/bouncers about when to cut people off.
The contribution system was fine with then.  (But then again, we have
a very limited use for government telling people what to do in Nevada :).

hawk

--
Prof. Richard E. Hawkins, Esq.  

(319) 266-7114                        http://eyry.econ.iastate.edu/hawk
These opinions will not be those of UNI until it pays my retainer.

 
 
 

Georgia House Bill 1383

Post by John Marti » Sat, 19 Feb 2000 04:00:00


On Tue, 15 Feb 2000 13:21:59 -0500, "Mark Nelson"

Quote:

>HB 1383 came to a vote today in the Ga House of Representatives and passed
>126-42 (a full 35 votes more than we needed!)!!!!!  Now it's on to the
>Senate!!!

>BTW, there were two attempted amendments, one to add local choice for Sunday
>sales and another to do away with the tax increases for stronger beer.  Both
>were turned down by large margins.

Boy, I can't wait til they allow beer sales on Sundays.  During the
last Governor's race I remember a column  in Creative Loafing by Jeff
Berry (?), who is pre***ly liberal, that stated that he'd vote
for whichever candidate (Milner or Barnes) that promised to get rid of
no beer sales on Sundays.

I (almost) second that! ;-)

John Martin

 
 
 

Georgia House Bill 1383

Post by kaela » Sat, 19 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Don't hold your breath on the beer sales on Sunday.. Remember..
This is the buckle of the bible belt and we'll probally never
see beer sales on Sunday.. Be grateful if they allow the
increase in *** for beer..

Ric

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