Kegging CO2 pressure?

Kegging CO2 pressure?

Post by Tim Horva » Fri, 17 Jan 1997 04:00:00




Quote:

>         I've got a batch of bitter in the ba***t as I ask this
> question, so a quick response would be much appreciated.  I was told
> that you can keg your wort, and apply a high psi at a low temp for a
> couple days for carbonation.  Right now, my beer is in a cornelius
> keg, in a refrigerators, at 20psi.  Is this set up too cold?  Too
> much/little pressure?  This is my first attempt at using a keg.  Any
> hints? Thnaks.
>                         Ganpai!
>                         -Mike

I use between 18 and 20 psi to carbonate at refrigerator temperatures. I
generally leave the pressure on for 3 or 4 days. Sounds like you're on the
right track.

Hints: I've found that dispensing at 5-7 psi works well. Be sure to vent
the keg to release the 20 psi pressure before trying to dispense. Also,
your first couple of pints may be cloudy, as the sediment will settle to
the bottom near the dip tube.

Tim

 
 
 

Kegging CO2 pressure?

Post by Michael Rothbe » Fri, 17 Jan 1997 04:00:00


        I've got a batch of bitter in the ba***t as I ask this
question, so a quick response would be much appreciated.  I was told
that you can keg your wort, and apply a high psi at a low temp for a
couple days for carbonation.  Right now, my beer is in a cornelius
keg, in a refrigerators, at 20psi.  Is this set up too cold?  Too
much/little pressure?  This is my first attempt at using a keg.  Any
hints? Thnaks.
                        Ganpai!
                        -Mike

 
 
 

Kegging CO2 pressure?

Post by Marty Tipp » Sat, 18 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>    I've got a batch of bitter in the ba***t as I ask this
>question, so a quick response would be much appreciated.  I was told
>that you can keg your wort, and apply a high psi at a low temp for a
>couple days for carbonation.  Right now, my beer is in a cornelius
>keg, in a refrigerators, at 20psi.  Is this set up too cold?  Too
>much/little pressure?  This is my first attempt at using a keg.  Any
>hints? Thnaks.

Rather than just randomly applying pressure and hoping for good results,
you can do a little math and figure out what the correct pressure should
be.  The following is from a response I posted a couple months ago to
someone asking similar questions - let me know if you need more
information:

=-=-=-=-=-
For reference, my BESCO catalog (suppliers of all sorts of kegging-related
stuff) says:

* Correct beer flow is about 2 oz. per second.
* For vertical lift, add 1 pound of resistance for each 2 ft. of lift as
measured from the vertical center of the keg to the tap
* For vertical drop, subtract 1/2 pound of resistance per foot.
* Vinyl beer hose (usually having 1/8" wall thickness) has the following
resistances (per foot):
        3/16" ID - 2.2 lbs  
        1/4"  ID - 0.6 lbs
        5/16" ID - 0.2 lbs
        3/8" ID  - 0.1 lbs

This is where things get a little complicated.  You need to know what
temperature you want to serve at as well as the pressure on the keg to
maintain the desired level of CO2.  Use a temperature/pressure chart to
figure this out (one is available at The Brewery
(http://www.FoundCollection.com/) in the library section)

For this example, say you want to serve at 46F and you want 2.5 volumes of
CO2 in your beer (a fairly standard setup).  The pressure you need is 14
psi, so you need to design your tubing and tap location to dissipate all of
that pressure at the tap.  For simplicity, say you're using 3/16" ID hose
and the tap is exactly at the center of the keg so there's no vertical rise
or drop.  Then you'd need for the tubing to be about 6 ft. 4 in. for proper
dispensing.  

Hope this is helpful and not too confusing...

-Marty
=======================================================================
Marty Tippin                 |Tippin's Law #23:  A watched pot never


-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Marty's Homebrew Gadgets Page: http://www.FoundCollection.com/
=======================================================================

 
 
 

Kegging CO2 pressure?

Post by TamberF » Sat, 25 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Quote:


>>        I've got a batch of bitter in the ba***t as I ask this
>>question, so a quick response would be much appreciated.  I was told
>>that you can keg your wort, and apply a high psi at a low temp for a
>>couple days for carbonation.  Right now, my beer is in a cornelius
>>keg, in a refrigerators, at 20psi.  Is this set up too cold?  Too
>>much/little pressure?  This is my first attempt at using a keg.  Any
>>hints? Thnaks.
>Rather than just randomly applying pressure and hoping for good results,
>you can do a little math and figure out what the correct pressure should
>be.  The following is from a response I posted a couple months ago to
>someone asking similar questions - let me know if you need more
>information:
>=-=-=-=-=-
>For reference, my BESCO catalog (suppliers of all sorts of kegging-related
>stuff) says:
>* Correct beer flow is about 2 oz. per second.
>* For vertical lift, add 1 pound of resistance for each 2 ft. of lift as
>measured from the vertical center of the keg to the tap
>* For vertical drop, subtract 1/2 pound of resistance per foot.
>* Vinyl beer hose (usually having 1/8" wall thickness) has the following
>resistances (per foot):
>    3/16" ID - 2.2 lbs  
>    1/4"  ID - 0.6 lbs
>        5/16" ID - 0.2 lbs
>        3/8" ID  - 0.1 lbs
>This is where things get a little complicated.  You need to know what
>temperature you want to serve at as well as the pressure on the keg to
>maintain the desired level of CO2.  Use a temperature/pressure chart to
>figure this out (one is available at The Brewery
>(http://www.FoundCollection.com/) in the library section)
>For this example, say you want to serve at 46F and you want 2.5 volumes of
>CO2 in your beer (a fairly standard setup).  The pressure you need is 14
>psi, so you need to design your tubing and tap location to dissipate all of
>that pressure at the tap.  For simplicity, say you're using 3/16" ID hose
>and the tap is exactly at the center of the keg so there's no vertical rise
>or drop.  Then you'd need for the tubing to be about 6 ft. 4 in. for proper
>dispensing.  
>Hope this is helpful and not too confusing...
>-Marty
>=======================================================================
>Marty Tippin                 |Tippin's Law #23:  A watched pot never


>-----------------------------------------------------------------------
>Marty's Homebrew Gadgets Page: http://www.FoundCollection.com/
>=======================================================================

While the above is quite useful info (for your average Ph.D in
physics! =), i question whether it's the info you're really looking
for...

Assuming you haven't added any priming sugar (though not a HUGE deal
if you already have), you can "force-carbonate" your brew using the
CO2..  First, the brew has to be cooled to fridge temp - CO2 will not
saturate warm brew.  Turn your regulator up to 30-40psi and rock the
keg back and forth (vigorously, but no so much as to shake it up) for
two to three minutes.  Wait a couple hours at the VERY minimum before
you try any, lest you be disappointed.  After apx. 24 hours the
harshness of the CO2 will have diminished to the point that you should
have a very enjoyable batch