Rocketeers who HAM it up

Rocketeers who HAM it up

Post by Mark G. Haven » Thu, 06 Sep 2001 00:43:42



After responding to the post about NOTAMS, an idea came to mind.
Please treat it carefully, new ideas are a rare thing from me.

In preparation for flying my new HPR rocket using the Radio Flyer
system, I need a ham license.

I do know that aircraft are supposed to monitor certain frequencies
for emergencys and such.

I believe Hams can transmit in these bands.

If you know the local guard frequencies, it MIGHT be possible for
ground to air comms to warn aircraft that violate waivered airspace.

Research is required into this subject, results will be posted.

Mark G. Havener

If at first you don't succeed,
then skydiving is not for you.

 
 
 

Rocketeers who HAM it up

Post by Jeff Hov » Thu, 06 Sep 2001 02:50:04


Quote:

> If you know the local guard frequencies, it MIGHT be possible for
> ground to air comms to warn aircraft that violate waivered airspace.

                                            ^^^^^^^

It is not a violation to for a pilot fly through a rocket launch area.
The rocketeers must share the airspace with any other users.  Filing a
notification, a NOTAM, or getting a waiver does not grant an exclusive
right to the airspace.

It is a violation for the rocketeers to launch when planes are present.
So it would be inappropriate to try to chase planes away.  Just don't
launch when you see one.

I believe that non-aircrew transmitting on air band frequencies would be
illegal except in an emergency.  Transmitting on a tower frequency could
even disrupt controllers and cause a danger.

-Jeff Hove  NAR 78680 L1   Private Pilot

 
 
 

Rocketeers who HAM it up

Post by Bob Kapl » Thu, 06 Sep 2001 02:59:22



Quote:
> After responding to the post about NOTAMS, an idea came to mind.
> Please treat it carefully, new ideas are a rare thing from me.

> In preparation for flying my new HPR rocket using the Radio Flyer
> system, I need a ham license.

> I do know that aircraft are supposed to monitor certain frequencies
> for emergencys and such.

> I believe Hams can transmit in these bands.

> If you know the local guard frequencies, it MIGHT be possible for
> ground to air comms to warn aircraft that violate waivered airspace.

> Research is required into this subject, results will be posted.

I don't believe that there are any aircraft bands that overlap with HAM
bands.

Bob "HAM since before the no-code license" Kaplow NAR # 18L TRA # "Ctrl-Alt-Del"

Kaplow Klips & Baffle:      http://www.nira.chicago.il.us/Leading_Edge/MayJun00.pdf
NIRA:   http://www.nira.chicago.il.us  NAR:    http://www.nar.org

Come to think of it, there are already a million monkeys on a million
typewriters, and Usenet is NOTHING like Shakespeare. -- Blair Houghton. 1988

 
 
 

Rocketeers who HAM it up

Post by Mark Saunder » Thu, 06 Sep 2001 11:16:18


The aircraft frequencies (appx. 118-134 MHz AM) are out of the 2 meter
amateur radio band (144-148 MHz usually FM).

Nice thought.

I believe we have shared use of the airspace and we MUST take a back seat to
aircraft in the area, whether or not we have a waiver.

--
Best regards,

Mark Saunders, KJ7BS
Glendale, Arizona
NAR 78825 L1
SSS


Quote:
> After responding to the post about NOTAMS, an idea came to mind.
> Please treat it carefully, new ideas are a rare thing from me.

> In preparation for flying my new HPR rocket using the Radio Flyer
> system, I need a ham license.

> I do know that aircraft are supposed to monitor certain frequencies
> for emergencys and such.

> I believe Hams can transmit in these bands.

> If you know the local guard frequencies, it MIGHT be possible for
> ground to air comms to warn aircraft that violate waivered airspace.

> Research is required into this subject, results will be posted.

> Mark G. Havener

> If at first you don't succeed,
> then skydiving is not for you.

 
 
 

Rocketeers who HAM it up

Post by Mark G. Haven » Fri, 07 Sep 2001 06:22:07


On Tue, 4 Sep 2001 19:16:18 -0700, "Mark Saunders"

Quote:

>The aircraft frequencies (appx. 118-134 MHz AM) are out of the 2 meter
>amateur radio band (144-148 MHz usually FM).

>Nice thought.

Actually, going over the question pool for Technician class, there is
a question where it does say HAMs can transmit from an aircraft, as
long as you have permission of the aircraft commander and the aircraft
is not under Instrument Flight Rules.

Quote:
>I believe we have shared use of the airspace and we MUST take a back seat to
>aircraft in the area, whether or not we have a waiver.

This statement has come out in several related threads and is the
sensible road to take. I for one would not want to have on my
conscience that a rocket I launched killed people. Very bad JuJu.

Mark G. Havener

If at first you don't succeed,
then skydiving is not for you.

 
 
 

Rocketeers who HAM it up

Post by Bob Kapl » Sat, 08 Sep 2001 02:22:23



Quote:
> On Tue, 4 Sep 2001 19:16:18 -0700, "Mark Saunders"

>>The aircraft frequencies (appx. 118-134 MHz AM) are out of the 2 meter
>>amateur radio band (144-148 MHz usually FM).

>>Nice thought.

> Actually, going over the question pool for Technician class, there is
> a question where it does say HAMs can transmit from an aircraft, as
> long as you have permission of the aircraft commander and the aircraft
> is not under Instrument Flight Rules.

yeabut...

Pilots don't monitor HAM frequencies, and you can't talk on the aircraft
frequencies from the ground unless you're an FAA control facility.

        Bob Kaplow      NAR # 18L       TRA # "Ctrl-Alt-Del"

Kaplow Klips & Baffle:      http://www.nira.chicago.il.us/Leading_Edge/MayJun00.pdf
NIRA:   http://www.nira.chicago.il.us  NAR:    http://www.nar.org

Come to think of it, there are already a million monkeys on a million
typewriters, and Usenet is NOTHING like Shakespeare. -- Blair Houghton. 1988

 
 
 

Rocketeers who HAM it up

Post by Mark G. Haven » Sun, 09 Sep 2001 04:03:16



Quote:


>> Actually, going over the question pool for Technician class, there is
>> a question where it does say HAMs can transmit from an aircraft, as
>> long as you have permission of the aircraft commander and the aircraft
>> is not under Instrument Flight Rules.

>yeabut...

>Pilots don't monitor HAM frequencies, and you can't talk on the aircraft
>frequencies from the ground unless you're an FAA control facility.

Then the issue is settled. A lot of the time I get ideas that have no
basis in practicality or reality.

Come to think of it, having ground comms from the flight line to
orbiting aircraft would have been a bad idea. I know when I have a HPR
bird on the pad, I am rather wound up. If someone would have been
orbiting the area and we had ground comms, I can imagine my
"conversation" with them:



from here.

I had "tie Mark to chair" and "sedate Mark" as part of my pre-launch
checklist at one time. "Wound up" is an understatement.

Mark G. Havener

There's a mighty big difference between good sound reasons
and reasons that sound good. - Hillis