Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by Dave Pachec » Sun, 31 Dec 2000 14:07:20



Santa was nice and gave me a digital camera for Christmas this year
so...

For anyone who's interested, I've put up some pics of my Loc IV after
its shovel recovery flight:

http://modelrockets.8m.com/rockets/loc4.html

The new pics are towards the bottom. Anyone have any ideas about how
to get the CRs that are still in there out so I can replace the whole
MMT? TIA!

Also, I have construction pics on my latest project, the Bravo II
(payloader):

http://modelrockets.8m.com/rockets/bravo2.html

--
Dave Pacheco
ICQ: 6568274            http://modelrockets.8m.com/home.html
NAR#: 77711             G.Y.R.O. #135

"Though I cannot fly, I'm not content to crawl." --'Nine Days'

 
 
 

Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by Tim Hansfor » Sun, 31 Dec 2000 19:12:05


I went to your site and about 1/2 your pics don't load?  Just thought I'd
let you know.

 
 
 

Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by Dave Pachec » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 00:18:55




Quote:
>I went to your site and about 1/2 your pics don't load?  Just thought I'd
>let you know.

Thanks. They all just worked for me, maybe you should give them more
time. I do have cable, but I *try* not to make my web pages as if
everyone else did, too. Some of the pics are pretty big, and I'll see
what I can do about making them smaller.

--
Dave Pacheco
ICQ: 6568274            http://modelrockets.8m.com/home.html
NAR#: 77711             G.Y.R.O. #135

"Though I cannot fly, I'm not content to crawl." --'Nine Days'

 
 
 

Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by Dave Pachec » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 01:17:15


Whoops...

Thanks to Steve Bloom and Dave Hanson, I figured out what was wrong
and I *think* it's fixed. Thanks to the two of them, and I hope it's
working now...

--
Dave Pacheco
ICQ: 6568274            http://modelrockets.8m.com/home.html
NAR#: 77711             G.Y.R.O. #135

"Though I cannot fly, I'm not content to crawl." --'Nine Days'

 
 
 

Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by Reprobat » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 01:36:38


as a general rule of thumb, how high can the wind be and still launch safely

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Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by Dean Rot » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 01:48:59


Quote:

> as a general rule of thumb, how high can the wind be and still launch safely

The FAA, NAR and TRA rules have a limit of 20 mph ground wind. However,
I find anything approaching 15 mph too much if I want to get my rocket
back.

The answer also depends upon the rocket's shape, thrust-to-weight ratio,
materials strength and stability of the launch facilities. A high
thrust-to-weight ratio can result in a safe launch, provided the rocket
doesn't fall apart and the launch pad doesn't wobble, wiggle or tilt.
Recovery is another issue to consider.

--
dean_roth at yahoo dot com
NOTE: Modify the return address to reply via email.

 
 
 

Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by Reprobat » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 02:36:53



Quote:

> > as a general rule of thumb, how high can the wind be and still launch
safely

> The FAA, NAR and TRA rules have a limit of 20 mph ground wind. However,
> I find anything approaching 15 mph too much if I want to get my rocket
> back.

> The answer also depends upon the rocket's shape, thrust-to-weight ratio,
> materials strength and stability of the launch facilities. A high
> thrust-to-weight ratio can result in a safe launch, provided the rocket
> doesn't fall apart and the launch pad doesn't wobble, wiggle or tilt.
> Recovery is another issue to consider.

> --
> dean_roth at yahoo dot com
> NOTE: Modify the return address to reply via email.

Yeh, the recovery issue came up last night, if anyone wants a code red its
sitting on the roof of a two story house, Of course we are brand new in this
hobby and we were using the largest engines available, now I realize that
with the conditions at the time a smaller engine would have resulted in an
easier recovery (I think).

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Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by David Weinshenke » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 03:06:10


Quote:

> as a general rule of thumb, how high can the
> wind be and still launch safely

The safety code says "20 miles per hour" or less...
I'd go for the "or less" (I like being able to find
the rocket again after the flight).

-dave w

 
 
 

Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by John Bococ » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 04:22:09


Quote:

> Santa was nice and gave me a digital camera for Christmas this year
> so...

> For anyone who's interested, I've put up some pics of my Loc IV after
> its shovel recovery flight:

> http://modelrockets.8m.com/rockets/loc4.html

> The new pics are towards the bottom. Anyone have any ideas about how
> to get the CRs that are still in there out so I can replace the whole
> MMT? TIA!

> Also, I have construction pics on my latest project, the Bravo II
> (payloader):

> http://modelrockets.8m.com/rockets/bravo2.html

> --
> Dave Pacheco
> ICQ: 6568274            http://modelrockets.8m.com/home.html
> NAR#: 77711             G.Y.R.O. #135

> "Though I cannot fly, I'm not content to crawl." --'Nine Days'

  Dave
It looked like the BT had slots for thru the wall fin mounting if so why
didn't you use them. Also why didn't you mount the shock cord to a
centering ring with a u-bolt.

John B.

 
 
 

Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by Dave Pachec » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 07:11:42


On Sat, 30 Dec 2000 11:22:09 -0800, John Bocock

Quote:

>  Dave
>It looked like the BT had slots for thru the wall fin mounting if so why
>didn't you use them. Also why didn't you mount the shock cord to a
>centering ring with a u-bolt.

>John B.

I did, but they didn't go to the motor (TTM?). The fins that came with
the kit had very tiny tabs that barely stuck through, and that's what
I used.

About the shock cord, I only thought of it after I mounted the tube
into the fin can. I had been building it stock, and since the
instructions didn't call for that I didn't do it. That was my biggest
mistake, I think.

--
Dave Pacheco
ICQ: 6568274            http://modelrockets.8m.com/home.html
NAR#: 77711             G.Y.R.O. #135

"Though I cannot fly, I'm not content to crawl." --'Nine Days'

 
 
 

Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by Dean Rot » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 08:27:55


Quote:

> hobby and we were using the largest engines available, now I realize that
> with the conditions at the time a smaller engine would have resulted in an
> easier recovery (I think).

Engine size has two factors: thrust and total impulse. A B4 motor has
less average thrust than a B6, but both have the same total impulse. The
B14 motor is no longer manufactured. It had a good kick (high average
thrust). Again, the total impulse was the same as the B4 and B6 motors.
If one ignores drag, which increases as speed increases, all three
motors will push the same rocket to the same altitude. A B14 would get
it off the pad much faster than a B4, though. In reality, due to drag, a
rocket will probably reach a lower altitude with a B14 than a B4.

On a calm day a rocket may fly well with an A3 motor. On a windier day
you may want to use an A8. The rocket will reach about the same altitude
with each motor, but will move off the pad faster with an A8.

How far will your rocket drift? An approximate value can be calculated
if you know the rocket's approximate maximum altitude and descent rate
under parachute. If we assume a descent rate of 15 ft/sec and a wind
speed of 10 miles per hour, which happens to be about 15 ft/sec, a
rocket will move forward for every foot it drops. If we assume an
altitude of 800' the rocket will travel approximately 800' downwind. Now
consider what happens if a rocket deploys a parachute at 5,000', the
ground wind is 15 mph and the wind at 5,000' is 30 mph. Good luck
finding it. A descent rate of 15 ft/sec means the rocket will descend
for about 333 seconds (5.6 minutes). Assuming an average wind speed of
22.5 miles per hour (33 ft/sec) the rocket will drift for about 11,000'
- almost two miles.

I once saw an underpowered rocket launched in a brisk wind (an Estes
type rocket). The rocket kept the nose cone pointed up, but it moved
horizontally almost as much as it moved vertically while the motor
burned. It was quite funny.

--
dean_roth at yahoo dot com
NOTE: Modify the return address to reply via email.

 
 
 

Loc IV Damage Pics and my latest project...

Post by The Silent Observe » Mon, 01 Jan 2001 13:49:13


Quote:

> as a general rule of thumb, how high can the wind be and still launch safely

The NAR and Tripoli Safety Codes specific no more than 20 mph -- IMO,
that's too much; I tend to think in terms of "another day" when it gets
much above 10 mph.

--
Some of their knowledge is corrupt, and inaccurate, being gleaned from
all manner of sources.  But like us, they are wizards too.
                                                    -- Jaldis the Blind

Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer           NAR # 70141-SR Insured
Rocket Pages                http://silent1.home.netcom.com/launches.htm
Telescope Pages            http://silent1.home.netcom.com/astronomy.htm

Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
and don't expect them to be perfect.