Newbie - Lost in Space

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by vegas.. » Tue, 21 Jul 1998 04:00:00



I recently built a small Estes model rocket and shot it into the
air... Two ***s watched it go straight up into the white clouds and
neither of us ever saw the rocket again... We kept watching the point
in the sky where it disappeared for over 5 minutes.  Are we crazy or
did I fail my science lesson on gravity???  Even if the parachute
didn't open for some reason, the rocket should have fallen to earth.
The trajectory was straight up and very little wind.  I really feel
"Lost in Space".....Anyone have a similar experience..... What
happened???   Thanks......
 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by Darrell D. Moble » Tue, 21 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Are we crazy ...???

Yes, for launching into clouds.  It's not safe.  What if the rocket had come down on
someone's head, pointy end first, ballistic?  The results wouldn't have been pretty.
--
Visit "Rocketry Online" at http://www.RocketryOnline.com for the latest rocketry-oriented
Internet information.

"You come here, we'll take you there..."

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by Helen Rapoz » Tue, 21 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
> I recently built a small Estes model rocket and shot it into the
> air... Two ***s watched it go straight up into the white clouds and
> neither of us ever saw the rocket again... We kept watching the point
> in the sky where it disappeared for over 5 minutes.  Are we crazy or
> did I fail my science lesson on gravity???  Even if the parachute
> didn't open for some reason, the rocket should have fallen to earth.
> The trajectory was straight up and very little wind.  I really feel
> "Lost in Space".....Anyone have a similar experience..... What
> happened???   Thanks......

Which rockets were these?  The Quark and the Mosquito.

 "Nick this way!", "No not this way!" - Godzilla

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by Rick Gaf » Tue, 21 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Winds aloft can be quite different from the wind at ground level. If you
lose sight of the model (very easy to do with small, over powered models
even with out the clouds) it would drift a long way in an unknown
direction. On the other hand if the model had simply nosed over and pranged
it could easily land far enough away that you would not hear it land. This
is why Estes recommends making a models' first flight with lower powered
motors, you get some experience with how it flys.

Better luck next time!

Rick Gaff



Quote:
> I recently built a small Estes model rocket and shot it into the
> air... Two ***s watched it go straight up into the white clouds and
> neither of us ever saw the rocket again... We kept watching the point
> in the sky where it disappeared for over 5 minutes.  Are we crazy or
> did I fail my science lesson on gravity???  Even if the parachute
> didn't open for some reason, the rocket should have fallen to earth.
> The trajectory was straight up and very little wind.  I really feel
> "Lost in Space".....Anyone have a similar experience..... What
> happened???   Thanks......

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by Darrell D. Moble » Tue, 21 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> > > Are we crazy ...???

> > Yes, for launching into clouds.  It's not safe.

> In other words, I've done it, too, and I'm not crazy.  Just learn from the
> experience and try not to do it again.

Maybe I should have put a smiley face behind my comment.  Jonathan,
firing a rocket into clouds is against the safety code.  The fact that
there are clouds all over is just not a good excuse.
--
Visit "Rocketry Online" at http://www.RocketryOnline.com for the latest
rocketry-oriented Internet information.

"You come here, we'll take you there..."

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by Darrell D. Moble » Tue, 21 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> I dont want to argue with you, or the safety code, im just wondering: why isnt it safe to
> launch into a cloud?

Because you can't see what you can't see.  ;-)  If you can't follow your
rocket, how do you know where it's going to land?  It could go though a
shed roof, hit a pedestrian, anything, if you don't know where it is.
--
Visit "Rocketry Online" at http://www.RocketryOnline.com for the latest
rocketry-oriented Internet information.

"You come here, we'll take you there..."

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by Jesse Robeto » Tue, 21 Jul 1998 04:00:00


I dont want to argue with you, or the safety code, im just wondering: why isnt it safe to
launch into a cloud?
Quote:


> > Are we crazy ...???

> Yes, for launching into clouds.  It's not safe.  What if the rocket had come down on
> someone's head, pointy end first, ballistic?  The results wouldn't have been pretty.
> --
> Visit "Rocketry Online" at http://www.RocketryOnline.com for the latest rocketry-oriented
> Internet information.

> "You come here, we'll take you there..."

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by nojun » Tue, 21 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
> Because you can't see what you can't see.  ;-)  If you can't follow your
> rocket, how do you know where it's going to land?  It could go though a
> shed roof, hit a pedestrian, anything, if you don't know where it is.

...or see if it's going to hit or even come close to anything in or
above the cloud.

--
Mike
NAR #70953 - Sr/Insured/Level-1 ~ SeaNAR - The Seattle NAR Section #568
NO Junk Email, please! Real email to: amphoto [at] blarg [dot] net.
<WARNING: Do not look into laser beam with remaining eye!>

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by Jim » Wed, 22 Jul 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
> I recently built a small Estes model rocket and shot it into the
> air... Two ***s watched it go straight up into the white clouds

Generally considered not cool to shoot into the clouds. But, if you are not
familiar with how high it will go, I can see it happening...

Quote:
>  and
> neither of us ever saw the rocket again... We kept watching the point
> in the sky where it disappeared for over 5 minutes.  Are we crazy

Dunno, you tell me.

Quote:
>  or
> did I fail my science lesson on gravity???

Dunno, ask your teacher ;)

Quote:
>   Even if the parachute
> didn't open for some reason, the rocket should have fallen to earth.

Yup.

Quote:
> The trajectory was straight up and very little wind.  I really feel
> "Lost in Space".....Anyone have a similar experience..... What
> happened???   Thanks......

One of three things...

1) Chute didn't open and you just didn't see it when it came down. It happens.

2) Chute opened and you just didn't see it when it came down. It happens.

3) Chute opened and it got caught in a thermal (was it a cumulus cloud?)
and it didn't come down for a long time, perhaps miles away. It happens.

Put your name and phone number somewhere on the rocket so when this happens
you might get it back...

--
Jim K.        ! Opinions: You want? I got!

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by Jonathan Guthri » Wed, 22 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

> > Are we crazy ...???
> Yes, for launching into clouds.  It's not safe.  What if the rocket had
> come down on someone's head, pointy end first, ballistic?  The results
> wouldn't have been pretty.

Of course it isn't a good idea to launch a rocket into clouds, but people
who are new to this may have difficulty estimating the ceiling and may
also have difficulty estimating how high the rocket will go.  While it
would be nice to say "never launch while a cloud is overhead" that isn't
realistic for many parts of the world for a lot of the year.

In other words, I've done it, too, and I'm not crazy.  Just learn from the
experience and try not to do it again.  

--

Information Broker Systems   +281-895-8101   http://www.brokersys.com/
12703 Veterans Memorial #106, Houston, TX  77014, USA

We sell Internet access and commercial Web space.  We also are general
network consultants in the greater Houston area.

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by sgable » Wed, 22 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Depending on how close you are to an airport or IFR approach corridor and to what altitude your
rocket flys. You could possibly hit an aircraft. A LMR can reach altitudes greater than 2500
feet so with one of these you wouldn't even necessarily need to be close to an airport to hit a
plane. Being an IFR pilot, I can personally vouch for the fact that when you are flying in the
clouds, you are to busy to worry about that loud noise you just heard : )

Quote:

> I dont want to argue with you, or the safety code, im just wondering: why isnt it safe to
> launch into a cloud?



> > > Are we crazy ...???

> > Yes, for launching into clouds.  It's not safe.  What if the rocket had come down on
> > someone's head, pointy end first, ballistic?  The results wouldn't have been pretty.
> > --
> > Visit "Rocketry Online" at http://www.RocketryOnline.com for the latest rocketry-oriented
> > Internet information.

> > "You come here, we'll take you there..."

--
Steven G. Ables
IAR #145
E-mail to sgables(at)swbell(dot)net
 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by The Silent Observe » Wed, 22 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> I recently built a small Estes model rocket and shot it into the
> air... Two ***s watched it go straight up into the white clouds and
> neither of us ever saw the rocket again... We kept watching the point
> in the sky where it disappeared for over 5 minutes.  Are we crazy or
> did I fail my science lesson on gravity???  Even if the parachute
> didn't open for some reason, the rocket should have fallen to earth.
> The trajectory was straight up and very little wind.  I really feel
> "Lost in Space".....Anyone have a similar experience..... What
> happened???   Thanks......

Well, nobody else on this group seems to have mentioned the sheer
improbability of actually getting high enough to fly >into< a cloud with
a beginner's model rocket.

It's much more likely that all an sundry simply lost sight of it -- and
I know from experience that once you lose sight of a rocket, it can
travel a considerable distance in an unexpected direction before it's
low enough to reacquire (and if you're not looking in that direction,
you'll never see it again).

Of course, there's also a theory that some rockets simply go up and
stick...

--
 WARNING!!  This area has been designated an official DOPE FREE ZONE!!

      If you're going to be a dope, please do it somewhere else!

Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer           NAR # 70141-SR Insured
Rocket Pages             http://www.FoundCollection.com/

Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
and don't expect them to be perfect.

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by Jonathan Guthri » Wed, 22 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

> > > > Are we crazy ...???
> > > Yes, for launching into clouds.  It's not safe.
> > In other words, I've done it, too, and I'm not crazy.  Just learn from the
> > experience and try not to do it again.
> Maybe I should have put a smiley face behind my comment.  Jonathan,
> firing a rocket into clouds is against the safety code.  The fact that
> there are clouds all over is just not a good excuse.

I note that you trimmed the part where I point out that it easily be done
by accident.  Cut the guy some slack.  Maybe you always take an inclinometer
to launches with you, but I don't, although I did get pretty good at
estimating ceilings when I was learning to fly.

--

Information Broker Systems   +281-895-8101   http://www.brokersys.com/
12703 Veterans Memorial #106, Houston, TX  77014, USA

We sell Internet access and commercial Web space.  We also are general
network consultants in the greater Houston area.

 
 
 

Newbie - Lost in Space

Post by starlor » Wed, 22 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
>I recently built a small Estes model rocket and shot it into the
>air... Two ***s watched it go straight up into the white clouds and
>neither of us ever saw the rocket again... We kept watching the point
>in the sky where it disappeared for over 5 minutes.  Are we crazy or
>did I fail my science lesson on gravity???  Even if the parachute
>didn't open for some reason, the rocket should have fallen to earth.
>The trajectory was straight up and very little wind.  I really feel
>"Lost in Space".....Anyone have a similar experience..... What
>happened???   Thanks......

>.

  Ah! once more the Life Time of a rocket ended while in flight!

  Back in the 70's it was once said that every rocket has it's
  own 'Life Time', some rockets die in crashs or for other resons
  before reaching their limit, but there are those who for some
  reson or another reach that time limit while in flight and once
  out of sight they disapear forever, never to be seen again.

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