Jetex fuel comp, pt. II

Jetex fuel comp, pt. II

Post by Michael Edelm » Tue, 10 Oct 1995 04:00:00



: A while ago we had a brief discussion fo the composition of Jetex
: fuel. I have another data point. According to "Rocket Propulsion
: Elements", 3rd ed, by G. Sutton (Wiley & Sons, 1964)

: "Mixtures of ammonium nitrate and guanadine nitrate with appropriate
: catylysts for decomposition are used for small rockets which propel
: small model aircraft. Loose powder is consolidated nder high pressure
: (perhaps 7000 lb per sq in.) into suitible molds. The finished charge
: is hard and rock-like in appearance."

: I wonder what the catalyst is?  I suspect a metal oxide, but I don't
: have any further evidence. What color is pure guanidine nitrate?

Further reading specifies that a chromite was used.

--mike

 
 
 

Jetex fuel comp, pt. II

Post by Michael Edelm » Tue, 10 Oct 1995 04:00:00


A while ago we had a brief discussion fo the composition of Jetex
fuel. I have another data point. According to "Rocket Propulsion
Elements", 3rd ed, by G. Sutton (Wiley & Sons, 1964)

"Mixtures of ammonium nitrate and guanadine nitrate with appropriate
catylysts for decomposition are used for small rockets which propel
small model aircraft. Loose powder is consolidated nder high pressure
(perhaps 7000 lb per sq in.) into suitible molds. The finished charge
is hard and rock-like in appearance."

I wonder what the catalyst is?  I suspect a metal oxide, but I don't
have any further evidence. What color is pure guanidine nitrate?

It does sound like it would be simple enough to make pellets with my
benchtop arbor press.

--mike

 
 
 

Jetex fuel comp, pt. II

Post by Gary Hugh » Fri, 13 Oct 1995 04:00:00



Quote:
>I wonder what the catalyst is?  I suspect a metal oxide, but I don't
>have any further evidence. What color is pure guanidine nitrate?

No idea about the catalyst, but guanidine nitrate is colorless when pure
according to Handbook of Chemistry (Lange). I have an old Flying Models
with a lengthy article about Cmdr. Benson, of autogyro fame. Apparently
he developed the Jetex propellant but failed to patent it. The article
mentioned something about 'steam compressing' and GN is very soluble.

Quote:
>It does sound like it would be simple enough to make pellets with my
>benchtop arbor press.

I've seen occasional mention of early model rocket type engines being
loaded with an arbor press. What IS an arbor press??

gary

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