Drill press ring cutter

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Rocket Houn » Wed, 26 Dec 2001 00:57:50



how well do these work?  i just got a 10 inch lathe and want to try making
some centering rings with it
 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Phil Stei » Wed, 26 Dec 2001 01:46:18


I've had good sucess with a combination of hole saws & a fly cutter.
A small drill press mounted drun sander helps too.

The only use I can see for a  lathe  would for small ones.

Phil Stein



Quote:
>how well do these work?  i just got a 10 inch lathe and want to try making
>some centering rings with it


 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Jerry O'Sulliva » Wed, 26 Dec 2001 03:14:15


I use 'em all the time on the drill press to cut the center hole. It just
takes a few tries to get it adjusted, but works great. I've done  29mm up to
6" no problem.

Jerry


Quote:
> how well do these work?  i just got a 10 inch lathe and want to try making
> some centering rings with it

 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by tai f » Wed, 26 Dec 2001 11:16:10


I have a small drill press and I read on a package of circle cutter that
says "max speed 500 rpm" and the problem is that my drill press wont go
below 700 rpm... it would be nice if I could somehow gear the thing down to
like 300 rpm so I can cut centering rings...
 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Phil Stei » Wed, 26 Dec 2001 10:11:14


I set mine as low as it will go & use a shield.  It's a little faster
than recommended but it work well.  Haven't had any problem at all.

BTW still looking for those jokes.

Phil Stein



Quote:
>I have a small drill press and I read on a package of circle cutter that
>says "max speed 500 rpm" and the problem is that my drill press wont go
>below 700 rpm... it would be nice if I could somehow gear the thing down to
>like 300 rpm so I can cut centering rings...

 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Kevin Trojanowsk » Wed, 26 Dec 2001 10:20:43


Quote:

> I set mine as low as it will go & use a shield.  It's a little faster
> than recommended but it work well.  Haven't had any problem at all.

Be EXTREMELY careful -- the biggest risk is that the fly cutter catch
and there be damage to your hands.

They really should be used at recommended speeds.

-Kevin

 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Phil Stei » Wed, 26 Dec 2001 10:40:28


I totally agree.  That's the reason for the shield.  Thanks for
mentioning it catching.  I always use a clamp that is like a half a
pair of vice grips that bolts to the drill press table.  The larger
the circle the more likely it is to catch.  Especially when the hole
is almost all the way through.

BE SAFE USE A CLAMP and a SHIELD.

Phil Stein

On Mon, 24 Dec 2001 19:20:43 -0600, Kevin Trojanowski

Quote:


>> I set mine as low as it will go & use a shield.  It's a little faster
>> than recommended but it work well.  Haven't had any problem at all.

>Be EXTREMELY careful -- the biggest risk is that the fly cutter catch
>and there be damage to your hands.

>They really should be used at recommended speeds.

>-Kevin

 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by George » Wed, 26 Dec 2001 11:09:34


Quote:

> I have a small drill press and I read on a package of circle cutter that
> says "max speed 500 rpm" and the problem is that my drill press wont go
> below 700 rpm... it would be nice if I could somehow gear the thing down to
> like 300 rpm so I can cut centering rings...

When Mountainside Hobbies had started producing my kits (V2, Sandhawk,
and so on) we used a circle cutter on a drill press to cut the rings.
Had no problems at all and our cutter also had the "500 rpm" warning.
And our press would not do less than 700 rpm.  Ran 100's of rings on
that system without a problem.
George
http://www.MilAirComms.com
* Original Designer of Mountainside Hobbies Kits (V2, Sandhawk and more)
* With Paperwork to Prove it
* Paid Peanuts for my work
* Work 100% more hours than agreeded
* And they wanted to pay me $1.00 per kit sold!
* Then they spread rumors......
 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Rhhick » Wed, 26 Dec 2001 11:30:27


I bought 2 fly-cutters and use a friend's drill press that I believe has the
lowest speed of 650, while the fly-cutter recommends a max of 500. I've used it
successfully, but I agree with the suggestions to clamp your wood down & give
the work your undivided attention; you've a fast spinning bar of steel  that
could do some permanent damage to you if your mind is wandering.  --  Richard
"for the 3rd year in a row, I failed to make the 3-stage three wi*** or the
flying manger scene......well Easter is just a few months away & I could do the
questionable  Jesus on the cross glider (other older, grumpier members begged
not to do THAT one.....we'll see) Hickok
 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Bob Kapl » Wed, 26 Dec 2001 23:13:40


Quote:

> When Mountainside Hobbies had started producing my kits (V2, Sandhawk,
> and so on) we used a circle cutter on a drill press to cut the rings.
> Had no problems at all and our cutter also had the "500 rpm" warning.
> And our press would not do less than 700 rpm.  Ran 100's of rings on
> that system without a problem.

Ditto. Most of the benchtop drill presses go no slower than 620rpm. That was
the low end on both my old and new models. You really have to go to the big
floor standing units to get a lower speed. My recommendation is to use the
lowest speed you've got, and don't have your hands ANYWHERE near the fly
cutter. One hand should be on the spindle advance handle, the other is best
kept in your pocket!

Any body know if a speed control can further slow a drill press? Or where to
get one for a fractional HP motor?

        Bob Kaplow      NAR # 18L       TRA # "Ctrl-Alt-Del"

Kaplow Klips & Baffle:      http://www.nira.chicago.il.us/Leading_Edge/MayJun00.pdf
NIRA:   http://www.nira.chicago.il.us  NAR:    http://www.nar.org

        You [should] not examine legislation in the light of the
        benefits it will convey if properly administered, but in the
        light of the wrongs it would do and the harm it would cause if
        improperly administered -- Lyndon Johnson, former President of
        the U.S.

        26-October, 2001: A day that will live in infamy
        Support Freedom: http://www.indefenseoffreedom.org/

 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Rocket Houn » Thu, 27 Dec 2001 15:29:47


Well, that's cool.  My press goes down to 540 RPM.  I think that will do it.
Where would i go about purchasing a shield?


Quote:
> I totally agree.  That's the reason for the shield.  Thanks for
> mentioning it catching.  I always use a clamp that is like a half a
> pair of vice grips that bolts to the drill press table.  The larger
> the circle the more likely it is to catch.  Especially when the hole
> is almost all the way through.

> BE SAFE USE A CLAMP and a SHIELD.

> Phil Stein

> On Mon, 24 Dec 2001 19:20:43 -0600, Kevin Trojanowski


> >> I set mine as low as it will go & use a shield.  It's a little faster
> >> than recommended but it work well.  Haven't had any problem at all.

> >Be EXTREMELY careful -- the biggest risk is that the fly cutter catch
> >and there be damage to your hands.

> >They really should be used at recommended speeds.

> >-Kevin

 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Bob Chmar » Fri, 28 Dec 2001 02:41:31


<snip>

Quote:
> My recommendation is to use the
> lowest speed you've got, and don't have your hands ANYWHERE near the fly
> cutter. One hand should be on the spindle advance handle, the other is
best
> kept in your pocket!

Seriously good advice, and exactly what I do.  After I power up the drill
press, my left hand goes in my back pocket.  As respectful as I am of my
table saw, I'm even more so of the circle cutter.  I consider it the most
dangerous tool I have.  Even at 380 rpm on my drill press, the cutting blade
is pretty much invisible.

Bob Chmara
www.chmara.com/bt/rocketry

 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Phil Stei » Fri, 28 Dec 2001 07:59:36


Not sure where to buy one but, you can clamp a heavy peice of
plexiglass to the table of the drill press.  Be sure it's clamped real
well.   MSCDirect.com might  have them.

 Also from my experience, the fly cutter grabing the wood & wacking
you with it is very common so be sure to a clamp the wood to the table
& keep your hands away.

Phil Stein



Quote:
>Well, that's cool.  My press goes down to 540 RPM.  I think that will do it.
>Where would i go about purchasing a shield?



>> I totally agree.  That's the reason for the shield.  Thanks for
>> mentioning it catching.  I always use a clamp that is like a half a
>> pair of vice grips that bolts to the drill press table.  The larger
>> the circle the more likely it is to catch.  Especially when the hole
>> is almost all the way through.

>> BE SAFE USE A CLAMP and a SHIELD.

>> Phil Stein

>> On Mon, 24 Dec 2001 19:20:43 -0600, Kevin Trojanowski


>> >> I set mine as low as it will go & use a shield.  It's a little faster
>> >> than recommended but it work well.  Haven't had any problem at all.

>> >Be EXTREMELY careful -- the biggest risk is that the fly cutter catch
>> >and there be damage to your hands.

>> >They really should be used at recommended speeds.

>> >-Kevin

 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by Mark Simps » Fri, 28 Dec 2001 23:58:23


Kevin,
I cut my centering rings from large pieces of plywood and I use the
drill press' tubular post as a stop for the wood. That way, I don't
have to clamp it down and can easily hold it by hand. I do wear gloves
and goggles, however.

Mark Simpson
NAR 71503 Level II

Quote:

> Be EXTREMELY careful -- the biggest risk is that the fly cutter catch
> and there be damage to your hands.

> They really should be used at recommended speeds.

> -Kevin

 
 
 

Drill press ring cutter

Post by The Silent Observe » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 11:21:03


Quote:

> Kevin,
> I cut my centering rings from large pieces of plywood and I use the
> drill press' tubular post as a stop for the wood. That way, I don't
> have to clamp it down and can easily hold it by hand. I do wear gloves
> and goggles, however.

Gloves are generally not recommended for working around rotating
machinery.  A moment's inattention that might cost you a fingernail or
the skin off a knuckle with bare hands, can lead to the tool pulling in
your whole arm if you're wearing gloves.

Goggles, OTOH, are a necessity for any power or hand tool work --
issuance of two eyeballs does not imply that one is a spare.

--
This space temporarily vacant.  Look for more wit and wisdom in the
next iteration.

Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer           NAR # 70141-SR Insured
Rocket Pages                http://silent1.home.netcom.com/launches.htm
Telescope Pages            http://silent1.home.netcom.com/astronomy.htm
Lathe Pages           http://silent1.home.netcom.com/HomebuiltLathe.htm

Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
and don't expect them to be perfect.