THOY Hornet,LOC Lil'Nuke

THOY Hornet,LOC Lil'Nuke

Post by Tom Binfor » Thu, 18 Jun 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

> Nick,
>                My tip for the Lil Nuke is to make sure you use epoxy
> rivets when attaching the fins. This is a great rocket, but you want a
> small(like the one that comes with the kit) chute, and you dont want
> the fins to break off every time it hits the ground. Drill holes along
> the fin attachment line just a wee bit smaller than the thickness of
> the fins, and attach fins with epoxy.

> Too bad the best motor to use in the Lil' Nuke isnt certified.. they
> are awesome with a AT F-52.

No problems on many flights with a stock built Lil Nuke, including G500
and H500 flights.
Tom
 
 
 

THOY Hornet,LOC Lil'Nuke

Post by Yves » Thu, 18 Jun 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>My tip for the Lil Nuke is to make sure you use epoxy
>rivets when attaching the fins. This is a great rocket, but you want a
>small(like the one that comes with the kit) chute, and you dont want
>the fins to break off every time it hits the ground. Drill holes along
>the fin attachment line just a wee bit smaller than the thickness of
>the fins, and attach fins with epoxy.

>Too bad the best motor to use in the Lil' Nuke isnt certified.. they
>are awesome with a AT F-52.

I've flown my Lil' Nuke built stock on motors ranging from E's to G's
without any problems.  I finally lost it to power lines and built a
new one with epoxy rivets.  I never had a fin break off on either
Lil'Nukes.  This is what I did to Lil' Nuke #2 just to make sure they
never do:

- Made sure to sand the glassine off the body tube where the fins
  would be glued on.

- Used epoxy rivets (small holes as described by the previous poster,
  works great as an alternative to slotting and going TTW).

- Used a good slow-cure epoxy for the actual fin filets, although I
  did use 30 minute epoxy for the initial gluing.  I used the 24-hour
  cure time variety for the fillet.  Most of these are also sandable
  so you can smooth them out for great looking filets.

In any event, the fin shape used by the Lil'Nuke is a very efficient
one and because they don't extend below the body tube, the body tube
itself usually handles the brunt of impact on hard landings.  Since
the rocket airframe is extra-thick 54mm motor tubing, it's very very
tough.  The Lil'Nuke is an exceptionnal rocket.  I've always thought
it and the LOC Vulcanite are probably the niftiest rockets of the
LOC/Precision fleet.

--
Yves

 
 
 

THOY Hornet,LOC Lil'Nuke

Post by Bob Kapl » Fri, 19 Jun 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>      I am wondering if the  Aerotech F22  will fly these with out any
> problems? If they would what is the best delays for them? Also are there
> any tips for building the LOC Lil'Nuke?

You didn't ask about building the Hornet, but I'll tell you anyway! I made 3
mods to mine, all described in detail inthe article referenced in my .sig: I
added a third centering ring and lengthened the MMT, built an ejection
baffle into the rocket, and of course added Kaplow Klips.

I also assembled this rocket using 100% Titebond, no epoxy or CA anywhere.
The rocket was completely covered with iron on airplace coverings, no paint
anywhere.

It flies great. At NSL last month I launches it on an H238, so I'm confident
it can take just about any 29mm motor you might find. But when you get to BJ
motors, you've always got to beware of any wind. On a calm day, the F22 would
do fine, but don't fly it in any wind. Any of the other CERTIFIED 29mm
reloads would do fine in this rocket. It's similar enough to the Graduator
in size and weight that I'd expect even the D13-4 reload would work, but I
haven't tried this yet. Maybe at MRFF this weekend.

        Bob Kaplow      NAR # 18L       TRA # "Ctrl-Alt-Del"

Kaplow Klips:   http://members.aol.com/myhprcato/KaplowKlips.html
NIRA:           http://www.nira.chicago.il.us