Starbooster launch

Starbooster launch

Post by Kaido Ker » Thu, 29 May 2003 18:02:20



..report here:
http://www.californiaspaceauthority.org/pr030517.html
thats mighty cool  !

( link via http://www.hobbyspace.com/Links/RLVNews.html )

-kert

 
 
 

Starbooster launch

Post by MONTMA » Fri, 30 May 2003 00:50:29


Quote:
>..report here:
>http://www.californiaspaceauthority.org/pr030517.html
>thats mighty cool  !

They  need to " Super Size It "
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dave Griffith
NAR 14156
The R.A.T.T.-works
Monterey Machine Products
1504-A Industrial Park Street
Covina, CA  91722 U.S.A.
http://www.rattworks.com

 
 
 

Starbooster launch

Post by James L. Marin » Fri, 30 May 2003 08:19:43


        I was at the launch, and saw all three flights. Most Excellent!! The
10 footer boosted on an M2000 Redline. You want to talk about cool! The
double glider boosted both times on L1120's. And, I'm happy to say, they
finally got a couple of guys on the remotes that know how to fly!! LOL


Quote:
> >..report here:
> >http://www.californiaspaceauthority.org/pr030517.html
> >thats mighty cool  !

> They  need to " Super Size It "
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Dave Griffith
> NAR 14156
> The R.A.T.T.-works
> Monterey Machine Products
> 1504-A Industrial Park Street
> Covina, CA  91722 U.S.A.
> http://www.rattworks.com

 
 
 

Starbooster launch

Post by defaul » Fri, 30 May 2003 23:54:39


Chris Taylor,
Have you checked out these guys?

Grrrr this!
http://www.californiaspaceauthority.org/pr030517.html

You might want to contact them and get some pointers.  They're flying L and M gliders!

Steve

 
 
 

Starbooster launch

Post by Chris Taylor J » Sat, 31 May 2003 03:22:48


Those are quite impressive. but when you have that much power things are not
as restrictive.

the problem for them is less Getting up so much as it is landing without
tearing them apart from the sounds of it.

Also how large are those gliders ?

Chris Taylor
http://www.nerys.com/


Quote:
> Chris Taylor,
> Have you checked out these guys?

> Grrrr this!
> http://www.californiaspaceauthority.org/pr030517.html

> You might want to contact them and get some pointers.  They're flying L
and M gliders!

> Steve

 
 
 

Starbooster launch

Post by James L. Marin » Sat, 31 May 2003 08:46:04


        The big one is 10 feet long, with a wing span of about 8 feet. Has a
canard on the front, but otherwise looks a lot like the Space Shuttle. The
two smaller ones look to be about 5 to 6 feet in length, and have a span of
about 4.5 feet. ***in' to watch 'em fly!
        While landing them without major structural damage has been a
challenge, the "up" part is no picnic. The large one has several gallons of
water housed in the nose during launch, to move the CG forward for
stability. As it reaches apogee, a valve opens and dumps the water, moving
the CG rearward so that the bird can transition into glide configuration.
        As for the smaller, twin-glider bird, imagine an Estes ARV Condor on
massive doses of steroids (and add the r/c control, of course).
James



Quote:
> Those are quite impressive. but when you have that much power things are
not
> as restrictive.

> the problem for them is less Getting up so much as it is landing without
> tearing them apart from the sounds of it.

> Also how large are those gliders ?

> Chris Taylor
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/



> > Chris Taylor,
> > Have you checked out these guys?

> > Grrrr this!
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/

> > You might want to contact them and get some pointers.  They're flying L
> and M gliders!

> > Steve

 
 
 

Starbooster launch

Post by Chris Taylor J » Sat, 31 May 2003 20:50:29


I imagine the challenge of those models was incredible !! Amazing !!

but they did have plenty of power.

they are much "smaller" than my model relatively speaking. the big one is 1
foot shorter and only 2 foot wider in span than my model and it has 32 times
the power. so they have room to work with as far as power goes.

that has been part of my problem. to large a model and too low an amount of
power. its a fine line that I am going to make work.

I can imagine CG shift would be crazy on that model. wonder if they got the
water idea from George G ?

Most impressive models and most impressive flights. I hope one day to be
able to see them in person.

Chris Taylor
http://www.FoundCollection.com/



Quote:
>         The big one is 10 feet long, with a wing span of about 8 feet. Has
a
> canard on the front, but otherwise looks a lot like the Space Shuttle. The
> two smaller ones look to be about 5 to 6 feet in length, and have a span
of
> about 4.5 feet. ***in' to watch 'em fly!
>         While landing them without major structural damage has been a
> challenge, the "up" part is no picnic. The large one has several gallons
of
> water housed in the nose during launch, to move the CG forward for
> stability. As it reaches apogee, a valve opens and dumps the water, moving
> the CG rearward so that the bird can transition into glide configuration.
>         As for the smaller, twin-glider bird, imagine an Estes ARV Condor
on
> massive doses of steroids (and add the r/c control, of course).
> James



> > Those are quite impressive. but when you have that much power things are
> not
> > as restrictive.

> > the problem for them is less Getting up so much as it is landing without
> > tearing them apart from the sounds of it.

> > Also how large are those gliders ?

> > Chris Taylor
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/



> > > Chris Taylor,
> > > Have you checked out these guys?

> > > Grrrr this!
> > > http://www.FoundCollection.com/

> > > You might want to contact them and get some pointers.  They're flying
L
> > and M gliders!

> > > Steve

 
 
 

Starbooster launch

Post by James L. Marin » Sun, 01 Jun 2003 08:50:06


        How much does yours weigh? These things are heavy. I seem to recall
that the larger glider is somewhere around 70 lbs. These people are
researching telemetry. Pardon the pun, but the sky's the limit as to how
much hardware is on board that thing, or what kind of data it's sending.
Considering that the motor it flew on was an M2000 Redline, it didn't go all
that high. Couple thousand feet at most, if that.


Quote:
> I imagine the challenge of those models was incredible !! Amazing !!

> but they did have plenty of power.

> they are much "smaller" than my model relatively speaking. the big one is
1
> foot shorter and only 2 foot wider in span than my model and it has 32
times
> the power. so they have room to work with as far as power goes.

> that has been part of my problem. to large a model and too low an amount
of
> power. its a fine line that I am going to make work.

> I can imagine CG shift would be crazy on that model. wonder if they got
the
> water idea from George G ?

> Most impressive models and most impressive flights. I hope one day to be
> able to see them in person.

> Chris Taylor
> http://www.FoundCollection.com/



> >         The big one is 10 feet long, with a wing span of about 8 feet.
Has
> a
> > canard on the front, but otherwise looks a lot like the Space Shuttle.
The
> > two smaller ones look to be about 5 to 6 feet in length, and have a span
> of
> > about 4.5 feet. ***in' to watch 'em fly!
> >         While landing them without major structural damage has been a
> > challenge, the "up" part is no picnic. The large one has several gallons
> of
> > water housed in the nose during launch, to move the CG forward for
> > stability. As it reaches apogee, a valve opens and dumps the water,
moving
> > the CG rearward so that the bird can transition into glide
configuration.
> >         As for the smaller, twin-glider bird, imagine an Estes ARV
Condor
> on
> > massive doses of steroids (and add the r/c control, of course).
> > James



> > > Those are quite impressive. but when you have that much power things
are
> > not
> > > as restrictive.

> > > the problem for them is less Getting up so much as it is landing
without
> > > tearing them apart from the sounds of it.

> > > Also how large are those gliders ?

> > > Chris Taylor
> > > http://www.FoundCollection.com/



> > > > Chris Taylor,
> > > > Have you checked out these guys?

> > > > Grrrr this!
> > > > http://www.FoundCollection.com/

> > > > You might want to contact them and get some pointers.  They're
flying
> L
> > > and M gliders!

> > > > Steve

 
 
 

Starbooster launch

Post by RayDunak » Sun, 01 Jun 2003 13:47:47


<< The big one is 10 feet long, with a wing span of about 8 feet. Has a canard
on the front, but otherwise looks a lot like the Space Shuttle. The two smaller
ones look to be about 5 to 6 feet in length, and have a span of about 4.5
feet.>>

I just took a look, and they are way cool! Nice work!

 
 
 

Starbooster launch

Post by Chris Taylor J » Sun, 01 Jun 2003 23:45:58


My first version weighed 12.5 pounds and was flying on cluster of 1 long
burn H (H55 or H45) and 1 Short Burn H (H128 H123)

Chris Taylor
http://www.FoundCollection.com/



Quote:
>         How much does yours weigh? These things are heavy. I seem to
recall
> that the larger glider is somewhere around 70 lbs. These people are
> researching telemetry. Pardon the pun, but the sky's the limit as to how
> much hardware is on board that thing, or what kind of data it's sending.
> Considering that the motor it flew on was an M2000 Redline, it didn't go
all
> that high. Couple thousand feet at most, if that.


> > I imagine the challenge of those models was incredible !! Amazing !!

> > but they did have plenty of power.

> > they are much "smaller" than my model relatively speaking. the big one
is
> 1
> > foot shorter and only 2 foot wider in span than my model and it has 32
> times
> > the power. so they have room to work with as far as power goes.

> > that has been part of my problem. to large a model and too low an amount
> of
> > power. its a fine line that I am going to make work.

> > I can imagine CG shift would be crazy on that model. wonder if they got
> the
> > water idea from George G ?

> > Most impressive models and most impressive flights. I hope one day to be
> > able to see them in person.

> > Chris Taylor
> > http://www.FoundCollection.com/



> > >         The big one is 10 feet long, with a wing span of about 8 feet.
> Has
> > a
> > > canard on the front, but otherwise looks a lot like the Space Shuttle.
> The
> > > two smaller ones look to be about 5 to 6 feet in length, and have a
span
> > of
> > > about 4.5 feet. ***in' to watch 'em fly!
> > >         While landing them without major structural damage has been a
> > > challenge, the "up" part is no picnic. The large one has several
gallons
> > of
> > > water housed in the nose during launch, to move the CG forward for
> > > stability. As it reaches apogee, a valve opens and dumps the water,
> moving
> > > the CG rearward so that the bird can transition into glide
> configuration.
> > >         As for the smaller, twin-glider bird, imagine an Estes ARV
> Condor
> > on
> > > massive doses of steroids (and add the r/c control, of course).
> > > James



> > > > Those are quite impressive. but when you have that much power things
> are
> > > not
> > > > as restrictive.

> > > > the problem for them is less Getting up so much as it is landing
> without
> > > > tearing them apart from the sounds of it.

> > > > Also how large are those gliders ?

> > > > Chris Taylor
> > > > http://www.FoundCollection.com/



> > > > > Chris Taylor,
> > > > > Have you checked out these guys?

> > > > > Grrrr this!
> > > > > http://www.FoundCollection.com/

> > > > > You might want to contact them and get some pointers.  They're
> flying
> > L
> > > > and M gliders!

> > > > > Steve