jetex

jetex

Post by neonknigh » Wed, 15 Aug 2001 06:57:40



every one has seen the auctions on Rocketryonline
but has any one ever seen a bid placed on one?

does any one know what jetex is, ive seen the pics and cannot figure out how
those are rocket related other than the word rocket in there occasionaly.
-michael brown

 
 
 

jetex

Post by Andy Waddel » Wed, 15 Aug 2001 07:06:23


A Jetex is something that looks kinda-sorta like a CO2 canister. Fuel
pellets are put inside, it is closed off, then a wick/fuse is used to light
the pellets, providing a relatively low jet-like thrust. Do a web search on
Jetex and you're bound to find sites describing it. Here's one that popped
up http://www.users.dircon.co.uk/~jetex/

--
Andrew D. Waddell
PML Online Support Rep
NAR L2 52875/TRA L2 2043

PML: www.publicmissiles.com

Quote:
> every one has seen the auctions on Rocketryonline
> but has any one ever seen a bid placed on one?

> does any one know what jetex is, ive seen the pics and cannot figure out
how
> those are rocket related other than the word rocket in there occasionaly.
> -michael brown


 
 
 

jetex

Post by Brett Buc » Wed, 15 Aug 2001 07:37:03


Quote:

> every one has seen the auctions on Rocketryonline
> but has any one ever seen a bid placed on one?

> does any one know what jetex is, ive seen the pics and cannot figure out how
> those are rocket related other than the word rocket in there occasionaly.
> -michael brown

    It's a little reloadable rocket motor, using small gas generator
pellets and a fuse to ignite. The current "50" sized ones put out a few
ounces of thrust for somethign on the order of 10 seconds. They are
primarily used for FF sport flying. They used to be a big deal for FF
competition, but they were out of production for 20 years.  There used
to be many sizes, the "35" "50" "50HT" "150", and the "600". The "50"
was the most common, and work on 18" span HLg's. The 150 would fly a
pretty big model, p-30 sized or so. These were the ones used in
competition.

   The biggest difficulties were leakage around the rear seal (old
asbestos gaskets were terrible, the new silicone ones are very much
superior) that tended to set the airplane on fire, and getting the fuse
wire out of the nozzle witout burning your fingers too badly.

  The guys advertising them on ROL actually have quite a bit of good
information, if you can tolerate the "everything was better in 1955"
attitude. The current "50" sized motor is pretty much the same, the
propellant is not as good. They're fun to  play with. Don't touch the
motor for about 10 minutes after the flight.

    Brett

 
 
 

jetex

Post by Scott D. Or » Wed, 15 Aug 2001 08:22:42




Quote:
>every one has seen the auctions on Rocketryonline
>but has any one ever seen a bid placed on one?

>does any one know what jetex is, ive seen the pics and cannot figure out how
>those are rocket related other than the word rocket in there occasionaly.

It's basically a slow-burning rocket used to power model aircraft.  I
have one but I haven't had time to build something to use it yet; it
is really cool, though.  Have a look at these pages:

http://jetex.org/

http://www.users.dircon.co.uk/~jetex/

Scott Orr

 
 
 

jetex

Post by Stefan E. Jone » Wed, 15 Aug 2001 09:09:51


The coolest thing on that site is the news on the "Rapier" motors . . .
Czech mini-motors, roughly A and B size, with 14 - 18 second burn times!
Quote:



> >every one has seen the auctions on Rocketryonline
> >but has any one ever seen a bid placed on one?

> >does any one know what jetex is, ive seen the pics and cannot figure out how
> >those are rocket related other than the word rocket in there occasionaly.

> It's basically a slow-burning rocket used to power model aircraft.  I
> have one but I haven't had time to build something to use it yet; it
> is really cool, though.  Have a look at these pages:

> http://jetex.org/

> http://www.users.dircon.co.uk/~jetex/

> Scott Orr

 
 
 

jetex

Post by Steve Gibbing » Wed, 15 Aug 2001 19:00:06


Yes but the average thrust will probably be far too low for "traditional"
rockets.  You need something that glides and produces lift.



Quote:
> The coolest thing on that site is the news on the "Rapier" motors . . .
> Czech mini-motors, roughly A and B size, with 14 - 18 second burn times!




> > >every one has seen the auctions on Rocketryonline
> > >but has any one ever seen a bid placed on one?

> > >does any one know what jetex is, ive seen the pics and cannot figure
out how
> > >those are rocket related other than the word rocket in there
occasionaly.

> > It's basically a slow-burning rocket used to power model aircraft.  I
> > have one but I haven't had time to build something to use it yet; it
> > is really cool, though.  Have a look at these pages:

> > http://jetex.org/

> > http://www.users.dircon.co.uk/~jetex/

> > Scott Orr

 
 
 

jetex

Post by Brett Buc » Wed, 15 Aug 2001 21:30:04




Quote:
> Yes but the average thrust will probably be far too low for "traditional"
> rockets.  You need something that glides and produces lift.

      That's more-or-less right. There's a high thrust version that supposed
would allow vertical launches, but the power/weight is marginal at best. And
there's nothing resembling an ejection charge.

    Someone was hard-over that they used to be and soon would be NAR
certified. I found no evidence that it had ever happened in the past, nor do
I think they are really of any use in model rocketry. But they are fun when
they work for FF models.

     Brett

 
 
 

jetex

Post by Darren J Longhor » Thu, 16 Aug 2001 06:17:29


Quote:
>     Someone was hard-over that they used to be and soon would be NAR
> certified. I found no evidence that it had ever happened in the past, nor
do
> I think they are really of any use in model rocketry. But they are fun
when
> they work for FF models.

I have some old plans for a two stage jetex powered rocket from some old
magazine. The rocket construction was very similar to the current jetex
powered gliders.