Wow, I didn't know it was THAT powerful!!!

Wow, I didn't know it was THAT powerful!!!

Post by Pope Jean-Paul Fouche » Wed, 21 Jan 1998 04:00:00



Yesterday I purchased an Estes Athena kit and put her together. Today I
went out to give her her maiden flight on a pack of C5-3's I bought at the
same time as the kit. Well I'm convinced this rocket was doomed from the
start. After having a BEAR of a time starting the first motor the rocket
flew VERY badly. Twisting and looping through the air. Upon recovery of the
rocket I notice NO defects in the airframe and the fins were as straight as
before. So I tried a second launch and got the same effect. I flew the
third time and it flew beautifully! Out of sight and all that! Now my
question is, what could have cause it to fly so erratically? Could it just
be the airframe "breaking in"? Or could it have been the motors themselves?

(Incedently, the third flight hung it 50 feet in a pine tree. 5 minutes
later a Navy Seahawk hovered the field where I was and checked it out. Are
the decals that metallic that they would have made it show up on their
screens as something? Talk about a heart attack! Lose a rocket AND get
buzzed by the navy! Gotta love jacksonville...)

-Embracing Spam Through Peace and Love (pffftt!)-
                 J.P. Fouchey

 
 
 

Wow, I didn't know it was THAT powerful!!!

Post by Ted Cochr » Wed, 21 Jan 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
>On 20 Jan 1998 22:04:09 GMT, "Pope Jean-Paul Fouchey"

>> I flew the third time and it flew beautifully! Out of sight and all
that! Now my
>>question is, what could have cause it to fly so erratically? Could it just
>>be the airframe "breaking in"? Or could it have been the motors themselves?

>Something is really marginal on the stability side. I'm thinking that
>the 'kick' from the launch rod, or maybe a wind gust was enough to
>haywire it. Assuming that the engine and recovery is done the same
>way, there should be almost no difference with the same conditions.

Check to be sure the motor retention clip is out of the way of the exhaust.
It may have been there the first two flights.

Quote:

>>(Incedently, the third flight hung it 50 feet in a pine tree. 5 minutes
>>later a Navy Seahawk hovered the field where I was and checked it out. Are
>>the decals that metallic that they would have made it show up on their
>>screens as something?

Yes.  Metallic decals could.  I'm forgetting what Athena looks like, but
if it has metallic decals on the fins, you have a _perfect_ radar
reflector.  Otherwise it's just another target.  Seahawk might have seen
it from a distance, too.  On IR, perhaps?

Quote:
>        Seriously though; I'd have a friendly chat with the base
>commander if I was going to do much launching at the same place.
>:-) good luck.

Definitely worth doing.  It's not required, but you can't launch any
rockets if the helos are circling overhead....

And a Phoenix might be a poor choice for you!

--tc

My opinions only.

 
 
 

Wow, I didn't know it was THAT powerful!!!

Post by Brian Shor » Wed, 21 Jan 1998 04:00:00


I knew it!!! The US Government IS covering up UFO's.  What else could it be,
some blip appearing on a radar screen, then dissapearing?

Brian Short

Quote:

> (Incedently, the third flight hung it 50 feet in a pine tree. 5 minutes
> later a Navy Seahawk hovered the field where I was and checked it out. Are
> the decals that metallic that they would have made it show up on their
> screens as something? Talk about a heart attack! Lose a rocket AND get
> buzzed by the navy! Gotta love jacksonville...)

> -Embracing Spam Through Peace and Love (pffftt!)-
>                  J.P. Fouchey


 
 
 

Wow, I didn't know it was THAT powerful!!!

Post by Jerry L. Gold » Thu, 22 Jan 1998 04:00:00


On 20 Jan 1998 22:04:09 GMT, "Pope Jean-Paul Fouchey"

Quote:

> I flew the third time and it flew beautifully! Out of sight and all that! Now my
>question is, what could have cause it to fly so erratically? Could it just
>be the airframe "breaking in"? Or could it have been the motors themselves?

Something is really marginal on the stability side. I'm thinking that
the 'kick' from the launch rod, or maybe a wind gust was enough to
haywire it. Assuming that the engine and recovery is done the same
way, there should be almost no difference with the same conditions.

Quote:
>(Incedently, the third flight hung it 50 feet in a pine tree. 5 minutes
>later a Navy Seahawk hovered the field where I was and checked it out. Are
>the decals that metallic that they would have made it show up on their
>screens as something? Talk about a heart attack! Lose a rocket AND get
>buzzed by the navy! Gotta love jacksonville...)

Wow... I knew that they were improving their radar capability (due to
stealth neccesity) but thats a pretty small target. I don't doubt it.
Unless they saw the smoke and didn't have anything better to do.
All their computer's are seeing is something small and moving faster
than some trigger level. Did the navy crew smile at you ?
        Say.... I can probably get you a drawing so that you can make
a full scale model of a Stinger. Load it with a G and fire it at the
same place......I'll watch the news.
        Seriously though; I'd have a friendly chat with the base
commander if I was going to do much launching at the same place.
:-) good luck.

remove the spam.
"spammers are killing all this"

 
 
 

Wow, I didn't know it was THAT powerful!!!

Post by Doug Steinfel » Thu, 22 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Yesterday I purchased an Estes Athena kit and put her together. Today I
> went out to give her her maiden flight on a pack of C5-3's I bought at the
> same time as the kit. Well I'm convinced this rocket was doomed from the
> start. After having a BEAR of a time starting the first motor the rocket
> flew VERY badly. Twisting and looping through the air. Upon recovery of the
> rocket I notice NO defects in the airframe and the fins were as straight as
> before. So I tried a second launch and got the same effect. I flew the
> third time and it flew beautifully! Out of sight and all that! Now my
> question is, what could have cause it to fly so erratically? Could it just
> be the airframe "breaking in"? Or could it have been the motors themselves?

Since the Athena has a plastic fin can it would have had to be a factory
defect.  Check out the nozzles of the spent motors.  They should look
pretty much like they did before they were fired.  The first MESS form
filed in 1998 reported Estes B6 motors where the nozzle severely
eroded causing twisting flight.  2 motors out of the pack did this--the
third was not flown.

Doug
------------------------------------------------------
Doug Steinfeld
NAR #70222
CMASS "Numbers? We don't need no stinkin' numbers"

 
 
 

Wow, I didn't know it was THAT powerful!!!

Post by Holde » Sat, 24 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Hehehehe... Get a Phoenix, line it with aluminum foil, and launch it
with an Aerotech E....
Let me know which prison they put you in, and I'll send you some
cigarettes...

                  JUST KIDDING, guys...please don't flame me...

 
 
 

Wow, I didn't know it was THAT powerful!!!

Post by Akela2 » Wed, 28 Jan 1998 04:00:00


Sounds to me like the rocket was unstable with the heavier engines
my 8 year old son has flown his Athena many times of "A" and "B" motors and
never had a problem. My class has also made over 120 "generic EX2" kits
(basically the same thing as the Athena) ans I have never seen anything like
what you described using "A's or "B's"