orange peel question

orange peel question

Post by Rocket_houn » Fri, 09 Nov 2001 14:39:22



Just repainted a repaired nose cone.  Spray kilzed the affected area then
painted with kylon.  i got orange peal right around the edge of the repaired
area where i sanded through old paint.  It isn't bad, but i was wondering if
i lightly sanded the peal off and repainted would it peal again?  The rest
of the cone looks dipped-in-glass......smoooooooth
 
 
 

orange peel question

Post by MONeill8 » Sat, 10 Nov 2001 14:52:36


'Orange peel' is most typically associated with applying the paint too thick to
an area. Several thin coats rather than one heavy coat will usually prevent
this. Also, if peel occurs at the edges of an area being painted, it may mean
that you either started or stopped spraying the paint at the edge of the area
being painted. Always start the spray several inches before the edge of the
area to be painted, make a smooth level stroke with the spray across the area,
then continue past the edge for several inches before ending the spray.

Having said all that, your problem may be entirely different. From your
description, it sounds like the new paint may possibly be reacting with the old
paint. In order to fix 'orange peel' (no matter what the cause), you must first
let the paint that you've already applied dry completely. Then lightly sand the
'peel' until it is gone. Now, repaint the sanded area following the light coat
technique desribed above.

I hope this works for you. (I served in the Marine Corps with the Presidential
Helicoptor Squadron and worked on Marine One as a structural mechanic. One of
my responsibilities was keeping the exterior paint on the President's
helicoptor looking like 'glass'. The techniques that I described above are
those that we used on the Presidents bird. The results speak for themselves!!)

Mike O'Neill

 
 
 

orange peel question

Post by Rocket_houn » Sat, 10 Nov 2001 15:59:01


From what you have said, it sounds like paint reaction is what is going on.
The previous paint came from the same can, however.

Well, Semper Fi Devil Dog!!!

I served in our beloved corps from 88-92.  I was a TOW 2 missile crewman.

Thanks for the data!


Quote:
> 'Orange peel' is most typically associated with applying the paint too
thick to
> an area. Several thin coats rather than one heavy coat will usually
prevent
> this. Also, if peel occurs at the edges of an area being painted, it may
mean
> that you either started or stopped spraying the paint at the edge of the
area
> being painted. Always start the spray several inches before the edge of
the
> area to be painted, make a smooth level stroke with the spray across the
area,
> then continue past the edge for several inches before ending the spray.

> Having said all that, your problem may be entirely different. From your
> description, it sounds like the new paint may possibly be reacting with
the old
> paint. In order to fix 'orange peel' (no matter what the cause), you must
first
> let the paint that you've already applied dry completely. Then lightly
sand the
> 'peel' until it is gone. Now, repaint the sanded area following the light
coat
> technique desribed above.

> I hope this works for you. (I served in the Marine Corps with the
Presidential
> Helicoptor Squadron and worked on Marine One as a structural mechanic. One
of
> my responsibilities was keeping the exterior paint on the President's
> helicoptor looking like 'glass'. The techniques that I described above are
> those that we used on the Presidents bird. The results speak for
themselves!!)

> Mike O'Neill

 
 
 

orange peel question

Post by RayDunak » Sat, 10 Nov 2001 16:53:49


<< 'Orange peel' is most typically associated with applying the paint too thick
to an area. >>

I find that I get the orange peel effect when using spraypaint cans in which
the paint is too thick, either due to not being thoroughly shaken/mixed, or
from setting around too long on the shelf.