Magnet Lugs and Lugless Launchs

Magnet Lugs and Lugless Launchs

Post by <KSold.. » Thu, 01 Jul 1999 04:00:00



I am experimenting with using 2 metal loops for launch lugs.

I cut the end from a paperclip and use that part as a lug.  I punch 2 tiny
holes through the body tube and put the ends of the cut clip through and
epoxy on the inside.  I place one lug at each end of the rocket.

picture 2 tiny staples in the side of the rocket and you will get the idea.

Try it and let me know.

Kristian Sorensen



I recently read about installing magnet lugs inside the body tube of
rockets to provide a launch with no external lugs, thus less air
resistance.
My questions are
1) What kinds of magnets are used?
2)  Do the weight of the magnets have to be balanced on the opposite
side of the tube for good flight?
3) What is the minimum size rocket where one can use magnetic lugs?
4) What is the minimum size lauch rod one can use with magnetic lugs?
Keith M Smith

 
 
 

Magnet Lugs and Lugless Launchs

Post by Keith M Smi » Fri, 02 Jul 1999 04:00:00


I recently read about installing magnet lugs inside the body tube of
rockets to provide a launch with no external lugs, thus less air
resistance.

My questions are

1) What kinds of magnets are used?

2)  Do the weight of the magnets have to be balanced on the opposite
side of the tube for good flight?

3) What is the minimum size rocket where one can use magnetic lugs?

4) What is the minimum size lauch rod one can use with magnetic lugs?

Keith M Smith

 
 
 

Magnet Lugs and Lugless Launchs

Post by Jonathan Coff » Fri, 02 Jul 1999 04:00:00


If you can find them , Neodinium magnets used in high powered tweeters
are one of the strongest magnets you can find, but ferrite ones shoud
work fine. Yes, they shoud be used on both sides as I stated before.
You need a minimum  of 3 sides with magnets so the rocket is repelled
on all sides so it is held straight. If it leans one way while
launching the magnets on the launch rails repell the magnets in the
rocket and keep it straight.Depending on the fin configuration you may
need three rails, or four.You shouldn't need large magnets in the
rocket, the more powerful ones should be installed on the launch
rails, so you should be able to fly the system with smaller rockets.



Quote:
>I recently read about installing magnet lugs inside the body tube of
>rockets to provide a launch with no external lugs, thus less air
>resistance.

>My questions are

>1) What kinds of magnets are used?

>2)  Do the weight of the magnets have to be balanced on the opposite
>side of the tube for good flight?

>3) What is the minimum size rocket where one can use magnetic lugs?

>4) What is the minimum size lauch rod one can use with magnetic lugs?

>Keith M Smith

 
 
 

Magnet Lugs and Lugless Launchs

Post by Jeff Burne » Fri, 02 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Have you actually tried this yet? What is the largest airframe you
have flown using this method?
BTW you can get those magnets rather cheaply from www.rockler.com
 A very good woodworkers source.

Jeff


Quote:

>If you can find them , Neodinium magnets used in high powered tweeters
>are one of the strongest magnets you can find, but ferrite ones shoud
>work fine. Yes, they shoud be used on both sides as I stated before.
>You need a minimum  of 3 sides with magnets so the rocket is repelled
>on all sides so it is held straight. If it leans one way while
>launching the magnets on the launch rails repell the magnets in the
>rocket and keep it straight.Depending on the fin configuration you may
>need three rails, or four.You shouldn't need large magnets in the
>rocket, the more powerful ones should be installed on the launch
>rails, so you should be able to fly the system with smaller rockets.



>>I recently read about installing magnet lugs inside the body tube of
>>rockets to provide a launch with no external lugs, thus less air
>>resistance.

>>My questions are

>>1) What kinds of magnets are used?

>>2)  Do the weight of the magnets have to be balanced on the opposite
>>side of the tube for good flight?

>>3) What is the minimum size rocket where one can use magnetic lugs?

>>4) What is the minimum size lauch rod one can use with magnetic lugs?

>>Keith M Smith

 
 
 

Magnet Lugs and Lugless Launchs

Post by TSmith13 » Fri, 02 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>If you can find them , Neodinium magnets used in high powered tweeters
>are one of the strongest magnets you can find,

 Check readers use very strong magnets, as well. I haven't toyed with them
myself, but my son has a couple. I guess an experiment is in order.

Tim Smith
TRA #4907 L2

 
 
 

Magnet Lugs and Lugless Launchs

Post by Doug Gonc » Sun, 04 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Eddy current drag might slow the rocket down.

Mangets are heavy. Lauch lugs are light. Lauch  lugs have drag. Magnets don't.

The simplest method is a steel rail curved to fit the body. The repulsion setup
mentioned in the other post would have less drag. Multiple coils could be used
for the rails instead.

Force equals electric vector cross the magnetic vector. Right hand rule.

"Model" rockets must be metal-free. Is a magnet metal? Alnico, yes. Ferrite,
no. Either way, heavy.

Sounds like the launcher would only fit one body tube size.

 Yours,

 Doug Goncz
 Experimental Machinist (DOT 600.260-022)
 Replikon Research (USA 22044-0094)
 http://users.aol.com/DGoncz or /ReplikonVA

 The ocean is the world's longest runway...

 
 
 

Magnet Lugs and Lugless Launchs

Post by Tai F » Tue, 06 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Model rockets isnt exactly metal free... The motor hook on many model
rockets are metal