Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by lunarlosREMOVE2EM.. » Fri, 27 Jan 2006 13:04:24



Well I see misinformaion is alive and well, and I might as well throw
my a new light on it.  Everyone hates Bush ... ok, I am conservative,
and I personally don't like him either.  I voted for Ronald Regan, and
God Bliss him, I miss that anti-soviet STATESMAN!

With that said, there was ease-dropping on American phone, fax, and
internet communications LOOOOOONG before 9/11.  Please lets all stand
and give a round of applause for PROJECT ECHELON!

Now this progam, KNEW it was breaking constitutional law.  So in order
to circumvent those *** things we call rights, RAW data was first
collected, then sent to a foreign entity for data reduction.  Once
done, it was then sent back to the United States for evaluation/action.
 NSA, OSI, and some that we don't even know about had a hand in this.
Yes yes, its the easy dumb ass way to just say X-Files, but for those
of us who REALLY understand the Washington "Star Chambers", know that
this stuff is not to be taken lighty.

Well I am about to lead some of you to water, and some of you will die
of thirst.  But for those of you who enjoy learning, no matter the
ending emotional result, I will paste documented proceedings of the
Austrailian Parliment concerning Echelon, and its legalities (enjoy):

Senator BROWN  (Tasmania) (6.47 p.m.) --I congratulate Senator Cooney
for that speech and particularly for his concern that there is a
tendency for legislative creep in this act and his concern that we have
to be very vigilant about legislation like this, which is the reason I
do not support it. The first parts of it which are to do with being
able to more effectively tap in on criminals does not concern me, but
the proposal from the second reading speech of the minister does
concern me. He said:

The foreign communications warrant will enable the interception of
particular communications which cannot be identified by reference to
specific services or named individuals--

   and he goes on to say:

This is a characteristic of the sophisticated digital technologies
which are increasingly *** in modern telecommunication systems.

The bill limits the powers to issue this category of warrants to
interception for the purpose of collecting foreign intelligence. To
reduce the possibility of inadvertently intercepting communications
between Australians, these warrants may be issued only in relation to
foreign communications.

   What it does not say is that this opens up the whole arena of spying
for commercial purposes and to the spying on all Australian
telecommunications going overseas. We know from the remarkable Sunday
program on Channel 9 called Big Brother is Listening on 23 May last
year that there is enormous facility these days, particularly through
the installations at Geraldton and Waihopai in New Zealand with massive
computers and dictionaries to pick out calls from amongst the millions
of faxes, emails and phone calls and to scan these so that every
conversation going out of this country is being listened into--and,
moreover, the information and the scanning of those calls can go direct
to Washington without any Australian intervention.

   I will be asking the minister tomorrow to give more information
about this process, this tearaway modern communication which is not
dealt with under this legislation. In fact, I am very concerned that
this legislation gives some legitimacy to this process of comprehensive
spying which is not confined to Australia or the United States--it is
carried on around the world. I believe that citizens should know about
it and be aware of the enormous potential damage that can accrue from
it, and tomorrow I will give the Senate some specific cases where this
form of intelligence has been abused in the political arena, in the
economic arena and used against the interests of ordinary citizens
speaking on mobile phones in the street. (Time expired)

Debate interrupted

Senator BROWN  (Tasmania) (9.31 a.m.) --I was saying before the debate
on the Telecommunications (Interception) Legislation Amendment Bill
2000 was adjourned yesterday that there is more to this legislation
than meets the eye, or at least there is more to the change to modern
communications than this legislation can deal with. At the outset I
might just say that if there are some senators missing from the chamber
this morning it may well be due to the traffic jams which have been
caused by the V8 car racing being imposed on Canberra at the moment. I
believe the delay is up to 40 minutes for some people making the
approach outside Parliament House at the moment. That aside, I refer to
Channel 9's Sunday program in May last year when reporter Ross
Coulthart interviewed New Zealand author and researcher Nicky Hager. Mr
Hager talked about the giant computer systems which use dictionary
systems to track down selected phone calls, faxes and Internet
communications coming in and out of Australia and indeed going between
other countries. One of these facilities is at Geraldton in Western
Australia, and most Australians know very little about it. Mr Hager
said:

One of the defining features of the Echelon system--

   that is, this giant computer tracking system on everybody's phone
calls--

is that it is a move away from what is the most effective way to spy on
our enemies to a system which is the most effective way of spying on
everyone.

   That is the reality of the modern world. While this bill points us
towards intervention in phone calls for criminals, drug handlers and
spies, in effect what it is not doing is saying that our whole spying
system is being moved to an international system which spies on
everybody's phone calls. Most Australians are not aware of that.

   The bill does refer to intervention in foreign phone calls--phone
calls going out of this country--but what it does not say is that
everybody's phone calls are being listened to, that everybody's phone
calls are being scanned and, moreover, that the check on this system is
not within our national boundaries. Australia has an arrangement with
the UK, the United States, Canada and New Zealand whereby the
downloading of selected phone calls--the intercepted calls which the
Americans, in particular, want to listen to--go straight to Washington.
I will be asking the government during the committee stages of this
debate what control Australia has over this spy system based here in
Australia. I think we will find that it is close to zero; that in fact
this information is being relayed straight to Washington and to other
countries without proper intervention by the Australian authorities.
When this bill says, `Let's intervene in certain phone calls made by
criminals and people with an intent that is not in Australia's
interests,' it is really missing the point--that is, that everybody's
phone calls are being listened in to and, as far as I know, this
parliament has no control over that. This parliament is not informed
about it. This parliament is not a watchdog on behalf of citizens. This
parliament does not know what our spy systems are doing and, more
particularly, it does not know what the foreign spy systems are doing
which are getting the information out of the Australian infrastructure.

   We are not in an age where this is simply spying--or even primarily
spying--in the defence interests of this country; we are in an age
where commercial interests are at the forefront in spying. Indeed,
President Clinton has made it very clear that, as far as the United
States is concerned, the intelligence agencies are there in the
interests of America's economic supremacy, its corporate interests.
Information being taken from these spy facilities, including here in
Australia, is passed on to the corporate system--the Forbes 500 and the
big multinational corporations--because it is in the interests of those
big systems to get the drop on their competitors around the world. The
Sunday program pointed to a number of cases where an advantage had been
given to either US or Canadian countries--in one case, a wheat deal in
favour of Canada, because the Canadians had picked up a phone call
coming out of a car in the United States--a call to do with a United
States bid for a world market. There was another extraordinary case
cited in the Channel 9 Sunday program of 23 May last year. Prime
Minister Thatcher of the United Kingdom was presumably able to get
information on two of her ministers through the Canadian connection of
this spying system--that is, the UK arm of it was kept clean while the
Canadians picked up information on two UK ministers about whom the
Prime Minister of the UK of the day was not sure. Is that the intent of
a spy system in which Australia is involved? What halt does this
legislation put on that sort of activity occurring in the international
arena against the interests of Australian people in general, let alone
elected Australians? Maybe the government will be able to disclaim that
extraordinary situation, as highlighted on the Sunday program. If so, I
would like to hear how.

   legislation does not allow for overseas phone calls to be
intercepted where an Australian citizen is involved at the other end.
Tell me about it! I believe that that is already occurring all over the
world through this massive intercept system of telecommunications. I
believe that this piece of legislation is nothing more than a
diversionary titbit. It does nothing to reassure me--and will do
nothing to reassure those few Australians who know about this spying
system--that there are very clear guidelines, controlled by the elected
members of this nation, on this massive international spy system. I
reiterate: it is no longer in the nation's interest that this spy
system be contained. There are no guidelines --or, if there are, let
them be brought before this Senate--to say that this spy system is
confined to working in Australia's national interests and against the
interests of those who might engage in criminal or political activities
that ...

read more »

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by the notorious t-e- » Fri, 27 Jan 2006 14:17:05


Quote:

> Well I see misinformaion is alive and well, and I might as well throw
> my a new light on it.  Everyone hates Bush ... ok, I am conservative,
> and I personally don't like him either.  I voted for Ronald Regan, and
> God Bliss him, I miss that anti-soviet STATESMAN!

My god....we actually agree on something :)

Alas, I've met 4 presidents....but never met Reagan :(

btw, please don't misspell his name again.

Ted Novak
TRA#5512
IEAS#75

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by matt vk3zm » Fri, 27 Jan 2006 15:23:55


Quote:


>> Well I see misinformaion is alive and well, and I might as well throw
>> my a new light on it.  Everyone hates Bush ... ok, I am conservative,
>> and I personally don't like him either.  I voted for Ronald Regan, and
>> God Bliss him, I miss that anti-soviet STATESMAN!

> My god....we actually agree on something :)

> Alas, I've met 4 presidents....but never met Reagan :(

> btw, please don't misspell his name again.

> Ted Novak
> TRA#5512
> IEAS#75

Bob brown is a complete fruitloop. I'd compare him to one of your
politicians for your benefit, but even the US doesn't have someone to
compare to this nut-job. Until last week, his party's policy was that
not only should *** like speed and *** be legalized, but that the
government should supply them free of charge to whoever wanted them.
Sounds like he's still under the influence of "research".

On the other hand, they advocate mandatory jail time for cutting down a
native tree, even if it is growing on your own land.

Oh yeah, he also decided to stage a one-man walkout when Bush was
invited to give an address to our parliment. Even if you don't like
Bush-as-a-political-leader, it's still disrespectful to
Bush-as-head-of-state.

Quoting Bob Brown on ANYTHING automatically reduces the authority of
your arguement.

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by James L. Marin » Fri, 27 Jan 2006 18:08:26


        And this has exactly WHAT to do with model rocketry?


<<clipped a bunch of OT hooey>>>

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by Jerry Irvin » Sat, 28 Jan 2006 01:20:30




Quote:
>         And this has exactly WHAT to do with model rocketry?



> <<clipped a bunch of OT hooey>>>

This is what is posted after people with real content are abused until
they leave.

Jerry

--
Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA

Please bring GROWTH back to consumer rocketry.
Produce then publish.  http://www.usrockets.com

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by shockwaverider » Sat, 28 Jan 2006 03:13:38


echelon and bush's "terrorist survelliance program" are two different
things:

Echelon sucks up all satellittle,internet,cable,etc communications
worldwide....it has suck sites(listening posts) world wide...it actually
taps the undersea cables and the internet.... and has been doing so for
years,even prior to the Clinton administration...

Bush's "terrorist survelliance program" which I agree with, (who needs some
pesky fisa warrants?) is doing just that: it is targeting communications
from american citizens who just happen to be of arab or muslim descent, and
who also just happen to be having conversations with people in Afghanistan,
Iraq, Pakistan,Syria,Lebanon,Iran,etc...

In WW2,  we rounded up and interned american-japanese citizens...although
later, due to political correctness, we deemed it wrong..... I would suggest
its a far better thing to be listening to these recent "american" citizens,
and I say that with a wink and a nod, as it hasn't been proven to me that
the majority of them don't agree or sympathize to some degree with Bin Laden
or radical Islam., than to round them up and put them in Utah....I might we
also (the FBI) surveiled the German-Americam population pretty good too.

I think some times liberals and leftists forget that we were attacked by
them first; we could have dropped a few atomic bombs and turned the mideast
into a paved parking lot(my preferred solution), but instead we showed
reserve and restraint due to world political correctness. Ever wonder how
Russia or China would react to such an act? well we've seen Russia response:
they  kill the terrorists along with their own citizens in bunches....

when it comes down to it heres what I beleive: If you want to kill me, I
have the right to kill you first. No questions asked.

what me worry?  alfred e.neuman

shockie B)


Quote:
> Well I see misinformaion is alive and well, and I might as well throw
> my a new light on it.  Everyone hates Bush ... ok, I am conservative,
> and I personally don't like him either.  I voted for Ronald Regan, and
> God Bliss him, I miss that anti-soviet STATESMAN!

> With that said, there was ease-dropping on American phone, fax, and
> internet communications LOOOOOONG before 9/11.  Please lets all stand
> and give a round of applause for PROJECT ECHELON!

> Now this progam, KNEW it was breaking constitutional law.  So in order
> to circumvent those *** things we call rights, RAW data was first
> collected, then sent to a foreign entity for data reduction.  Once
> done, it was then sent back to the United States for evaluation/action.
> NSA, OSI, and some that we don't even know about had a hand in this.
> Yes yes, its the easy dumb ass way to just say X-Files, but for those
> of us who REALLY understand the Washington "Star Chambers", know that
> this stuff is not to be taken lighty.

> Well I am about to lead some of you to water, and some of you will die
> of thirst.  But for those of you who enjoy learning, no matter the
> ending emotional result, I will paste documented proceedings of the
> Austrailian Parliment concerning Echelon, and its legalities (enjoy):

> Senator BROWN  (Tasmania) (6.47 p.m.) --I congratulate Senator Cooney
> for that speech and particularly for his concern that there is a
> tendency for legislative creep in this act and his concern that we have
> to be very vigilant about legislation like this, which is the reason I
> do not support it. The first parts of it which are to do with being
> able to more effectively tap in on criminals does not concern me, but
> the proposal from the second reading speech of the minister does
> concern me. He said:

> The foreign communications warrant will enable the interception of
> particular communications which cannot be identified by reference to
> specific services or named individuals--

>   and he goes on to say:

> This is a characteristic of the sophisticated digital technologies
> which are increasingly *** in modern telecommunication systems.

> The bill limits the powers to issue this category of warrants to
> interception for the purpose of collecting foreign intelligence. To
> reduce the possibility of inadvertently intercepting communications
> between Australians, these warrants may be issued only in relation to
> foreign communications.

>   What it does not say is that this opens up the whole arena of spying
> for commercial purposes and to the spying on all Australian
> telecommunications going overseas. We know from the remarkable Sunday
> program on Channel 9 called Big Brother is Listening on 23 May last
> year that there is enormous facility these days, particularly through
> the installations at Geraldton and Waihopai in New Zealand with massive
> computers and dictionaries to pick out calls from amongst the millions
> of faxes, emails and phone calls and to scan these so that every
> conversation going out of this country is being listened into--and,
> moreover, the information and the scanning of those calls can go direct
> to Washington without any Australian intervention.

>   I will be asking the minister tomorrow to give more information
> about this process, this tearaway modern communication which is not
> dealt with under this legislation. In fact, I am very concerned that
> this legislation gives some legitimacy to this process of comprehensive
> spying which is not confined to Australia or the United States--it is
> carried on around the world. I believe that citizens should know about
> it and be aware of the enormous potential damage that can accrue from
> it, and tomorrow I will give the Senate some specific cases where this
> form of intelligence has been abused in the political arena, in the
> economic arena and used against the interests of ordinary citizens
> speaking on mobile phones in the street. (Time expired)

> Debate interrupted

> Senator BROWN  (Tasmania) (9.31 a.m.) --I was saying before the debate
> on the Telecommunications (Interception) Legislation Amendment Bill
> 2000 was adjourned yesterday that there is more to this legislation
> than meets the eye, or at least there is more to the change to modern
> communications than this legislation can deal with. At the outset I
> might just say that if there are some senators missing from the chamber
> this morning it may well be due to the traffic jams which have been
> caused by the V8 car racing being imposed on Canberra at the moment. I
> believe the delay is up to 40 minutes for some people making the
> approach outside Parliament House at the moment. That aside, I refer to
> Channel 9's Sunday program in May last year when reporter Ross
> Coulthart interviewed New Zealand author and researcher Nicky Hager. Mr
> Hager talked about the giant computer systems which use dictionary
> systems to track down selected phone calls, faxes and Internet
> communications coming in and out of Australia and indeed going between
> other countries. One of these facilities is at Geraldton in Western
> Australia, and most Australians know very little about it. Mr Hager
> said:

> One of the defining features of the Echelon system--

>   that is, this giant computer tracking system on everybody's phone
> calls--

> is that it is a move away from what is the most effective way to spy on
> our enemies to a system which is the most effective way of spying on
> everyone.

>   That is the reality of the modern world. While this bill points us
> towards intervention in phone calls for criminals, drug handlers and
> spies, in effect what it is not doing is saying that our whole spying
> system is being moved to an international system which spies on
> everybody's phone calls. Most Australians are not aware of that.

>   The bill does refer to intervention in foreign phone calls--phone
> calls going out of this country--but what it does not say is that
> everybody's phone calls are being listened to, that everybody's phone
> calls are being scanned and, moreover, that the check on this system is
> not within our national boundaries. Australia has an arrangement with
> the UK, the United States, Canada and New Zealand whereby the
> downloading of selected phone calls--the intercepted calls which the
> Americans, in particular, want to listen to--go straight to Washington.
> I will be asking the government during the committee stages of this
> debate what control Australia has over this spy system based here in
> Australia. I think we will find that it is close to zero; that in fact
> this information is being relayed straight to Washington and to other
> countries without proper intervention by the Australian authorities.
> When this bill says, `Let's intervene in certain phone calls made by
> criminals and people with an intent that is not in Australia's
> interests,' it is really missing the point--that is, that everybody's
> phone calls are being listened in to and, as far as I know, this
> parliament has no control over that. This parliament is not informed
> about it. This parliament is not a watchdog on behalf of citizens. This
> parliament does not know what our spy systems are doing and, more
> particularly, it does not know what the foreign spy systems are doing
> which are getting the information out of the Australian infrastructure.

>   We are not in an age where this is simply spying--or even primarily
> spying--in the defence interests of this country; we are in an age
> where commercial interests are at the forefront in spying. Indeed,
> President Clinton has made it very clear that, as far as the United
> States is concerned, the intelligence agencies are there in the
> interests of America's economic supremacy, its corporate interests.
> Information being taken from these spy facilities, including here in
> Australia, is passed on to the corporate system--the Forbes 500 and the
> big

...

read more »

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by Bob Kapl » Sat, 28 Jan 2006 08:55:34


Quote:

> In WW2,  we rounded up and interned american-japanese citizens...although
> later, due to political correctness, we deemed it wrong..... I would suggest
> its a far better thing to be listening to these recent "american" citizens,
> and I say that with a wink and a nod, as it hasn't been proven to me that
> the majority of them don't agree or sympathize to some degree with Bin Laden
> or radical Islam., than to round them up and put them in Utah....I might we
> also (the FBI) surveiled the German-Americam population pretty good too.

The German immagrants were left alone because they looked like us. That
includes my wife's family that barely escaped from the Nazis. The folks who
looked "different" were rounded up, whether they came here a year ago, or
had lived here for years, decades, or even generations.

It's not political correctness. What was done to AMERICAN CITIZENS during
WWII was UNCONSTITUTIONAL and WRONG. It was as wrong then as it is today.
But this country has a habit of ignoring its own laws when it starts feeling
paranoid. In those immortal words, "we have met the enemy, and he is us".

Quote:
> I think some times liberals and leftists forget that we were attacked by
> them first; we could have dropped a few atomic bombs and turned the mideast
> into a paved parking lot(my preferred solution), but instead we showed
> reserve and restraint due to world political correctness. Ever wonder how

We weren't attacked by Afghanistan or Iraq. We were attacked by a group of
terrorists operating out of a general region, not affiliated with any
particular country. Most of them were Saudi, which we have NOT invaded.

Quote:
> Russia or China would react to such an act? well we've seen Russia response:
> they  kill the terrorists along with their own citizens in bunches....

Do you think that the US military would not have shot down flight 93 if it
had not gone down on its own, and it had the chance to do so? Are you
POSITIVE that this did not happen and everything we've heard to date about
that flight wasn't government cover-up?

How many American Citizens were killed in US Government ambushes in Ruby
Ridge or Waco? How about in Philadelphia? (what have I forgot here?)

Quote:
> when it comes down to it heres what I beleive: If you want to kill me, I
> have the right to kill you first. No questions asked.

So the first to pull a weapon loses? Does that apply if you are an innocent
bystander in Iraq being shot at by foreign troops occupying your land? Does
that apply if JBGTs kick in my door with guns drawn in the middle of the
night?

Just curious?

--
  Bob Kaplow   NAR # 18L   >>> To reply, there's no internet on Mars (yet)! <<<
Kaplow Klips & Baffle:      http://nira-rocketry.org/Document/MayJun00.pdf
    www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/    www.nira-rocketry.org    www.nar.org

... One nation under surveillance, divisive, with liberty and justice for none.

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by shockwaverider » Sun, 29 Jan 2006 05:06:35


I see you haven't forgotten Ruby Ridge, Waco and the Philadeplhia "Move"
helicopter police bombing.... What woke me up about my government was 1974
and the SLA.. remember them? They would not come out of the house in LA and
LA SWAT burned the house down around their heads.....killing them inside?
talk about a wake up call!...

As far as Flight 93 is concerned: it doesn't bother me that the USAF may
have actually shot it down... nor will I have a problem if hijackers hijack
other airplanes to use as weapons, that we may shoot them down with
civilians on board....War is hell... civilians get caught in the
cross-fire.... I guess you would prefer one to plow into the white houe or
capital building LIVE on TV?  wait a minute... thats not such a bad idea....
talk about a visual! we can get islamic radicals to take down our own
government since americans don't seem to have the backbone to do it for
themselves...

actually the person who doesn't pull the trigger first loses.....

do you seriously think Israel will allow Iran to get the bomb? How fast do
you think Hamas or Hezbollah will have access to that? Do you realize that
we are 1 bullet away from Pakistan falling into islamic extremetrists hands?
I say nuke the ***ers and let God sort out the wheat from the chaff.....

I say before they detonate one on us, we simply put an end to it now, once
and for all....and detonate a few on them....

shockie B)


Quote:


>> In WW2,  we rounded up and interned american-japanese citizens...although
>> later, due to political correctness, we deemed it wrong..... I would
>> suggest
>> its a far better thing to be listening to these recent "american"
>> citizens,
>> and I say that with a wink and a nod, as it hasn't been proven to me that
>> the majority of them don't agree or sympathize to some degree with Bin
>> Laden
>> or radical Islam., than to round them up and put them in Utah....I might
>> we
>> also (the FBI) surveiled the German-Americam population pretty good too.

> The German immagrants were left alone because they looked like us. That
> includes my wife's family that barely escaped from the Nazis. The folks
> who
> looked "different" were rounded up, whether they came here a year ago, or
> had lived here for years, decades, or even generations.

> It's not political correctness. What was done to AMERICAN CITIZENS during
> WWII was UNCONSTITUTIONAL and WRONG. It was as wrong then as it is today.
> But this country has a habit of ignoring its own laws when it starts
> feeling
> paranoid. In those immortal words, "we have met the enemy, and he is us".

>> I think some times liberals and leftists forget that we were attacked by
>> them first; we could have dropped a few atomic bombs and turned the
>> mideast
>> into a paved parking lot(my preferred solution), but instead we showed
>> reserve and restraint due to world political correctness. Ever wonder how

> We weren't attacked by Afghanistan or Iraq. We were attacked by a group of
> terrorists operating out of a general region, not affiliated with any
> particular country. Most of them were Saudi, which we have NOT invaded.

>> Russia or China would react to such an act? well we've seen Russia
>> response:
>> they  kill the terrorists along with their own citizens in bunches....

> Do you think that the US military would not have shot down flight 93 if it
> had not gone down on its own, and it had the chance to do so? Are you
> POSITIVE that this did not happen and everything we've heard to date about
> that flight wasn't government cover-up?

> How many American Citizens were killed in US Government ambushes in Ruby
> Ridge or Waco? How about in Philadelphia? (what have I forgot here?)

>> when it comes down to it heres what I beleive: If you want to kill me, I
>> have the right to kill you first. No questions asked.

> So the first to pull a weapon loses? Does that apply if you are an
> innocent
> bystander in Iraq being shot at by foreign troops occupying your land?
> Does
> that apply if JBGTs kick in my door with guns drawn in the middle of the
> night?

> Just curious?

> --
>  Bob Kaplow   NAR # 18L   >>> To reply, there's no internet on Mars (yet)!
> <<<
> Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://www.FoundCollection.com/
>    www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/    www.nira-rocketry.org
> www.nar.org

> ... One nation under surveillance, divisive, with liberty and justice for
> none.

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by lunarlosREMOVE2EM.. » Sun, 29 Jan 2006 09:46:15


Ok ok Kaplow ... let me solve this for you ...

AMERICA ... F*&K Yeah ... fighting to save another motherf*%king day
now!
AMERICA ... F*%K Yeah!  Slavery ... Fu\&*K Yeah ... NFL F*&K Yeah!
NASCAR ... F*&K Yeah!

Kaplow, rent a copy of TEAM AMERICA and listen VERY VERY closely when
the actor (Team America
member) gives the story about D*cks, P*ssys and Assh*les.  The puppet
will make it all clear to you.

Anyone have a source for that Team America Delta Jet plane ... that
could be made into a model rocket
and kitted!

America ... F*CK YEAH!  Kaplow ... F*^K NO!

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by Robert Julian » Sun, 29 Jan 2006 10:20:13


Quote:

> Ok ok Kaplow ... let me solve this for you ...

> AMERICA ... F*&K Yeah ... fighting to save another motherf*%king day
> now!
> AMERICA ... F*%K Yeah!  Slavery ... Fu\&*K Yeah ... NFL F*&K Yeah!
> NASCAR ... F*&K Yeah!

> Kaplow, rent a copy of TEAM AMERICA and listen VERY VERY closely when
> the actor (Team America
> member) gives the story about D*cks, P*ssys and Assh*les.  The puppet
> will make it all clear to you.

> Anyone have a source for that Team America Delta Jet plane ... that
> could be made into a model rocket
> and kitted!

> America ... F*CK YEAH!  Kaplow ... F*^K NO!

loonie-loser,

for those of us that haven't seen the movie...

How about you bullet point whatever position(s) you are promoting?

Bob

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by lunarlosREMOVE2EM.. » Sun, 29 Jan 2006 10:26:01


Well if you haven't seen TEAM AMERICA, you are missing out on one of
the greatest political satire films of the century.
So RJ, get off your uninformed ass, drive down to block buster, or
visit bit torrent on the web, and get TEAM America!  Kaplow is, so
should you!

Bullet points ... F*&K Yeah!

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by Robert Julian » Sun, 29 Jan 2006 15:42:35


Quote:

> Well if you haven't seen TEAM AMERICA, you are missing out on one of
> the greatest political satire films of the century.
> So RJ, get off your uninformed ass, drive down to block buster, or
> visit bit torrent on the web, and get TEAM America!  Kaplow is, so
> should you!

> Bullet points ... F*&K Yeah!

I guess that means that all of those honors courses in poli-sci are for
nought. After all, how could reading 50 books on political theory,
economics, US history, and anything written by Heinlein compare to a
movie with vulgar puppets?

Oh the shame of it, that I should be found out in my rejection of a
great cinematic work. Oh woe is me!

And here I thought the original "manchurian candidate," "Bob Roberts," "
syriana," or that flick with the senator losing his marbles and becoming
captain liberal,  were the satire flicks.

Loonie old boy, it would seem to me that perhaps you'd be a little bit
better off, with a few viewings of other movies.

Bob (a confirmed movie ***. no hope of recovery.)

 
 
 

Echelon, Bill "the discrace" Clinton's American Citizen Spy Program ...

Post by Alan Jone » Mon, 30 Jan 2006 03:42:54


On Fri, 27 Jan 2006 20:20:13 -0500, Robert Juliano

Quote:


>> Ok ok Kaplow ... let me solve this for you ...

>> AMERICA ... F*&K Yeah ... fighting to save another motherf*%king day
>> now!
>> AMERICA ... F*%K Yeah!  Slavery ... Fu\&*K Yeah ... NFL F*&K Yeah!
>> NASCAR ... F*&K Yeah!

>> Kaplow, rent a copy of TEAM AMERICA and listen VERY VERY closely when
>> the actor (Team America
>> member) gives the story about D*cks, P*ssys and Assh*les.  The puppet
>> will make it all clear to you.

>> Anyone have a source for that Team America Delta Jet plane ... that
>> could be made into a model rocket
>> and kitted!

>> America ... F*CK YEAH!  Kaplow ... F*^K NO!

>loonie-loser,

>for those of us that haven't seen the movie...

>How about you bullet point whatever position(s) you are promoting?

>Bob

I think if some of these Team America: Word Police fans want to get
back on the team, they should demonstrate there worthiness by
performing a service on Jerry. :(  ;)  Sick, just sick.