Mosquito records

Mosquito records

Post by Ryan Woebkenbe » Mon, 19 Feb 1996 04:00:00



Hello all!

A while back (guess a year or so ago) some cat posted that some
person or persons had flew an Estes Mosquito a bunch of times.  Does any
one out there rember the number of times and what motors they used.
Curiosity killed the cat.

--Ryan

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by Mark D. Jils » Mon, 19 Feb 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

>Hello all!

>A while back (guess a year or so ago) some cat posted that some
>person or persons had flew an Estes Mosquito a bunch of times.  Does any
>one out there rember the number of times and what motors they used.
>Curiosity killed the cat.

>--Ryan

A few years ago at NARCON in Colorado Springs, a young man flew a Mosquito
for the 15th or 16th time with all flights being A10-3T (according to him
and I have no reason to doubt him).  At that time Mike Hellmund of Estes
acquired the rocket with intentions of adding it to an Estes collection.

Mark D. Jilson  - Digital Customer Support Center
                  Colorado Springs, Colorado

NAR #54156 -- COSROCS, In Thrust We Trust

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by Thomas L. Burns » Tue, 20 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Okay, how about this Mosquito record:

At the last LDRS, I launched my daughter's M. to 15,000 feet on an L750.

(I'll grant you that it was in the payload section of a LaserLOC 3.1 at
the time, but it did make it to 15,000 ft.)

Tom "Useless Post? What Useless Post?" Burns

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by David Fun » Wed, 21 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>Hello all!

>A while back (guess a year or so ago) some cat posted that some
>person or persons had flew an Estes Mosquito a bunch of times.  Does any
>one out there rember the number of times and what motors they used.
>Curiosity killed the cat.

>--Ryan

if I could just fly one more than ONCE, I would set a personal record.  So far I've bought,
flown and lost 12.   gonna start scratch building them just to*** this thing!!!!

I'm extremly envious of the DARS folks....


The views expressed do not represent my employer.

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by Jerry Irvi » Wed, 21 Feb 1996 04:00:00




Quote:
> Okay, how about this Mosquito record:

> At the last LDRS, I launched my daughter's M. to 15,000 feet on an L750.

> (I'll grant you that it was in the payload section of a LaserLOC 3.1 at
> the time, but it did make it to 15,000 ft.)

> Tom "Useless Post? What Useless Post?" Burns

Actually, that probably counts!

Jerry Irvine

"But he flew a BIC pen once and intentionally removed the ejection
charge.  Sure it wrote first time, every time, but look at the price in
safety code ethics!"

--

Box 1242, Claremont, CA 91711 USA
Opinion, the whole thing.

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by Lee Re » Thu, 22 Feb 1996 04:00:00





: >
: >Hello all!
: >
: >A while back (guess a year or so ago) some cat posted that some
: >person or persons had flew an Estes Mosquito a bunch of times.  Does any
: >one out there rember the number of times and what motors they used.
: >Curiosity killed the cat.
: >
: >--Ryan

: A few years ago at NARCON in Colorado Springs, a young man flew a Mosquito
: for the 15th or 16th time with all flights being A10-3T (according to him
: and I have no reason to doubt him).  At that time Mike Hellmund of Estes
: acquired the rocket with intentions of adding it to an Estes collection.

: Mark D. Jilson  - Digital Customer Support Center
:                   Colorado Springs, Colorado

: NAR #54156 -- COSROCS, In Thrust We Trust

I was at that event, and I remember it flying several times there, at
a minimum. An amazing record.  My daughters and I flew Mosquitos for
the first time last weekend.  Oldest daughter loses her's on school roof.
We were 300 feet from school, and it went straight up, but it went so
UNBELIEVABLY high that the slight breeze carried it an incredible
distance horizontally.  Next, youngest daughter flies her Mosquito, and
youth's incredible eyesight spots it several hundred feet away.
I fly next, and mine just flat out disappears, after an apparently straight
boost.

We have more motors (all A10s), so we convince Lindsey to fly again
(since she is only one with rocket).  Goes straight up, but no wind,
we all lose it, and it falls 10 feet from Megan -- she hears it coming
in.  OK, time for 3rd launch, and trajectory is like all the others.
It is lost like the others, and we still have motors. :-(

We will go back and walk the fields, hopefully finding the two that
we think didn't land on roofs.  I believe the only place to really
fly Mosquitos is the desert, where anything shows on hardpacked
sand. :-)

Family record:  3 flights, and hopefully to be found for more attempts.
--
Lee Reep  

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by Scott Goodm » Thu, 22 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Hey all, just wanted to add that I HAD a Mosqiuto..once.
 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by D433-Bennett_L_Lewis(B » Thu, 22 Feb 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
> Hey all, just wanted to add that I HAD a Mosqiuto..once.

For me it all hinges on keeping my eye on the Mosquito at all times.

Two things I have done are:

1) When I visited a launch/meeting of CRASH, the Denver-area NAR chapter,
one of the members had attached reflective silver mylar to the fins and
body of his Mosquito.  The sparkly reflections way-up-high make it much
easier to acquire and maintain visual contact.

2) (This implies I never launch it while alone).  When it is my daughter's
turn to launch, I stand at least 75 yards back from the launcher.  Even
with the minimal smoke trails from 13mm motors, I find the track easier
to follow when viewed from a distance, rather than directly below the
flight path.

Those things, and, oh yeah, only using 1/2A's in the Mosquito have kept
us finding our latest "Mossy" after [less than half a dozen] launches.


 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by David Buche » Fri, 23 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Prior to the Estes Mosquito there was a thing called an Astron
Streak whiche was actually lighter than the Mosquito even though its
physical dimensions were somewhat larger (due to its mylar body tube
to which the balsa fins were glued after first attaching sticky paper
strips that the glue might adhere to) and the recommended motors went
all the way to C-67 and although I never had one (no substance!) I
recall really small kids getting these first because of their being the
least expensive model you could buy.  I don't recall ever seeing one
recovered (with B or C motors) although those were the days of
1/4 A motors and they were used by the very same kids who bought the
Streak kits and for the same reasons!
anyone remember the Astron Streak (love that ASTRON!)?

Dave

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by Willia » Fri, 23 Feb 1996 04:00:00


    We were 300 feet from school, and it went straight up, but it went so
    UNBELIEVABLY high that the slight breeze carried it an incredible
    distance horizontally.

Was it really the breeze?  The usual problem I have is that when the
ejection charge kicks out the motor, the resultant "thrust" kicks the
rocket itself very quickly in a direction that's likely to be pretty
random compared to the rest of the flight.

BillW

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by Lee Re » Fri, 23 Feb 1996 04:00:00


:     We were 300 feet from school, and it went straight up, but it went so
:     UNBELIEVABLY high that the slight breeze carried it an incredible
:     distance horizontally.

: Was it really the breeze?  The usual problem I have is that when the
: ejection charge kicks out the motor, the resultant "thrust" kicks the
: rocket itself very quickly in a direction that's likely to be pretty
: random compared to the rest of the flight.

: BillW

For the first launch, we definitely had a breeze.  Your observation may
explain why the other flights, with apparently no breeze, still had
varying paths after ejection.
--
Lee Reep  

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by Lee Re » Fri, 23 Feb 1996 04:00:00


: Prior to the Estes Mosquito there was a thing called an Astron
: Streak whiche was actually lighter than the Mosquito even though its
: physical dimensions were somewhat larger (due to its mylar body tube
: to which the balsa fins were glued after first attaching sticky paper
: strips that the glue might adhere to) and the recommended motors went
: all the way to C-67 and although I never had one (no substance!) I
: recall really small kids getting these first because of their being the
: least expensive model you could buy.  I don't recall ever seeing one
: recovered (with B or C motors) although those were the days of
: 1/4 A motors and they were used by the very same kids who bought the
: Streak kits and for the same reasons!
: anyone remember the Astron Streak (love that ASTRON!)?

Yes!  That was called BT-10, if you recall.  :-)

--
Lee Reep  

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by M Pred » Fri, 23 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Our solution was to paint the thing gloss black, go over that with gloss
diamond urethane finish (I forget the manufacturer---its that famous one for
urethanes), and go over that with car wax.  It comes out shiny enough to
double as a signalling device for clandestine operations behind enemy lines.
Seriously, right after launch the key is to *listen* carefully.  In 5
launches my son and I have heard it hit the ground 5 times, and have
actually tracked it twice under bright sun.

Mark



Quote:
>Hey all, just wanted to add that I HAD a Mosqiuto..once.

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by Rick » Fri, 23 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>...(all A10s)...
> Family record:  3 flights, and hopefully to be found for more attempts.

I visited a CSAR club launch in Columbus OH and managed to lose
an orange Mosquito on  a 1/4A-4T.  Someone thought they saw it
land in the grass, but 6 people looking for 25 minutes couldn't
find it.  I'm not inclined to try another on anything larger.

Perhaps about a square mile of salt flats would allow them to be
found.  I think I'd want binoculars to scan for the rocket on
the ground.  The ideal range site would be bent grass,
slightly bowl shaped, and about 20 miles square wouldn't it?

 
 
 

Mosquito records

Post by PaulDimi » Sat, 24 Feb 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
(D433-Bennett_L_Lewis(Ben)x82340) writes:

>For me it all hinges on keeping my eye on the Mosquito at all times.

>Two things I have done are:

>1) When I visited a launch/meeting of CRASH, the Denver-area NAR chapter,
>one of the members had attached reflective silver mylar to the fins and
>body of his Mosquito.  The sparkly reflections way-up-high make it much
>easier to acquire and maintain visual contact.

>2) (This implies I never launch it while alone).  When it is my
daughter's
>turn to launch, I stand at least 75 yards back from the launcher.  Even
>with the minimal smoke trails from 13mm motors, I find the track easier
>to follow when viewed from a distance, rather than directly below the
>flight path.

>Those things, and, oh yeah, only using 1/2A's in the Mosquito have kept
>us finding our latest "Mossy" after [less than half a dozen] launches.

In addition, I painted my Mosquito Krylon Flourescent Red with one
Flourescent Yellow fin.  These colors (really any Flourescent colors) help
me to find the rocket once it has landed.  For newbies, always use a
primer, then white, then the flourescent color.  The white helps the
flourescent color to be brighter and more reflective.

The mylar fin idea really does sound interesting too!  Think I'll have to
try that.

Paul.

Fly Baby Fly!