Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by Gareth Qual » Sun, 03 Aug 2003 06:20:20



I'm completing a project to make a re-creation of a Lionel "Scenic Railway"
to put on display in an historic toy store operated by the museum system in
our town.  I've used the illustrations of the original in the 1922 Lionel
catalog, and a photo of one that still exists in a collection from the
Kalmbach book on duplicating Lionel dealer display layouts, as my guide.
The basic ground covering is some Life-like "mountain paper" that comes very
close to the color blotched brown wrapping paper Lionel appears to have
used.  I now want to duplicate the old Lionel grass made of dyed green
sawdust to add some texture to the paper ground cover, and to hide some of
my seams in the paper covering.  I've found some RIT Kelly Green, and Dark
Green dye in a local Kroger, and have sifted the contents of the shop vac
connected to my radial arm saw through window screen to get sawdust of the
right size.

Before I start by trial and error, I wonder if anyone out there has used dye
to color scenery material who would have any pointers?  Specifically, the
RIT instructions call for using boiling water/dye, but I think this may be
to set the color in fabric, and may not be as important for layout use, so I
want to try to use tepid water.  Will this work?  Thanks.  Gary Q

 
 
 

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by Hudson Leight » Sun, 03 Aug 2003 07:09:44



Quote:

> I'm completing a project to make a re-creation of a Lionel "Scenic Railway"
> to put on display in an historic toy store operated by the museum system in
> our town.  I've used the illustrations of the original in the 1922 Lionel
> catalog, and a photo of one that still exists in a collection from the
> Kalmbach book on duplicating Lionel dealer display layouts, as my guide.
> The basic ground covering is some Life-like "mountain paper" that comes very
> close to the color blotched brown wrapping paper Lionel appears to have
> used.  I now want to duplicate the old Lionel grass made of dyed green
> sawdust to add some texture to the paper ground cover, and to hide some of
> my seams in the paper covering.  I've found some RIT Kelly Green, and Dark
> Green dye in a local Kroger, and have sifted the contents of the shop vac
> connected to my radial arm saw through window screen to get sawdust of the
> right size.

> Before I start by trial and error, I wonder if anyone out there has used dye
> to color scenery material who would have any pointers?  Specifically, the
> RIT instructions call for using boiling water/dye, but I think this may be
> to set the color in fabric, and may not be as important for layout use, so I
> want to try to use tepid water.  Will this work?  Thanks.  Gary Q

RIT dyes are/or contain a salt I belive, be very carefull with them around
metal.

I would suggest using tempura pigments to color sawdust

-Hudson

--
http://www.skypoint.com/~hudsonl

 
 
 

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by Bil » Sun, 03 Aug 2003 07:24:09


I'm completing a project to make a re-creation of a Lionel "Scenic
Railway" to put on display in an historic toy store operated by the
museum system in our town. I've used the illustrations of the original
in the 1922 Lionel catalog, and a photo of one that still exists in a
collection from the Kalmbach book on duplicating Lionel dealer display
layouts, as my guide. The basic ground covering is some Life-like
"mountain paper"-------------
Before I start by trial and error, I wonder if anyone out there has used
dye to color scenery material
--------------------------------------------------
Gareth, did you look at Life-Like's "sawdust"? They have two different
colors...one of which is green.

Bill
Bill's Railroad Empire
N Scale Model Railroad:
http://www.billsrailroad.net
Brief History of N Scale:
http://www.billsrailroad.net/history/n-scale
Resources: Links to over 500 helpful sites:
http://www.billsrailroad.net/bills-favorite-links
Bookstore: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bookstore.html

 
 
 

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by Trainma » Sun, 03 Aug 2003 08:58:27



Quote:
> I'm completing a project to make a re-creation of a Lionel "Scenic
Railway"
> to put on display in an historic toy store operated by the museum system
in
> our town.  I've used the illustrations of the original in the 1922 Lionel
> catalog, and a photo of one that still exists in a collection from the
> Kalmbach book on duplicating Lionel dealer display layouts, as my guide.
> The basic ground covering is some Life-like "mountain paper" that comes
very
> close to the color blotched brown wrapping paper Lionel appears to have
> used.  I now want to duplicate the old Lionel grass made of dyed green
> sawdust to add some texture to the paper ground cover, and to hide some of
> my seams in the paper covering.  I've found some RIT Kelly Green, and Dark
> Green dye in a local Kroger, and have sifted the contents of the shop vac
> connected to my radial arm saw through window screen to get sawdust of the
> right size.

> Before I start by trial and error, I wonder if anyone out there has used
dye
> to color scenery material who would have any pointers?  Specifically, the
> RIT instructions call for using boiling water/dye, but I think this may be
> to set the color in fabric, and may not be as important for layout use, so
I
> want to try to use tepid water.  Will this work?  Thanks.  Gary Q

Rather than RIT dye, I use "Ceramcoat" acrylics.  Take a 1lb. margarine tub,
put about 1" of water in the bottom, and a healthy squirt of whatever color
you want.  fill the tub with sawdust, and stir it up until it's thoroughly
mixed.  Dump the whole mess out on a sheet of newspaper and let it dry
overnight.

Don

--

http://www.geocities.com/don_dellmann



http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/MRPics

 
 
 

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by Christia » Sun, 03 Aug 2003 09:01:54


Quote:
> Before I start by trial and error, I wonder if anyone out there has used
dye
> to color scenery material who would have any pointers?

It isn't light fast.
Daylight and/or Fluorescents do it in in just a few months.

CTucker
NY

 
 
 

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by R. Hargra » Sun, 03 Aug 2003 23:50:47


From the book "How to build realistic model railroad scenery".  Dave frays says
to gather twice the ammunt of saw dust that you think you'll need or your
project, usually half will be hrown away.  tools and materials needed a 5
gallon pail, window screen, *** gloves, an assortment of dyes, newspaper, a
2' stick.  Purchase a packet of the following colors Forrest green thru medium
green  to light yellow green.  Work outside if possible, to start heat 2
gallons of water almost to boiling, then pour the water into the 5 gal pail,
add a packet of the lightest green and stir until disolved.  Add sawdust a
handfull ata time untill all the liquid is absorbed, set the pail aside and let
it cool.  while waiting start the next pail of water for the next batch,  after
20 minutes the first batch should be cool to work with, put on gloves grab a
handfull of wet sawdust and squeese out the excess water. seat the sawdust out
on several sheets of newspaper to speed drying, use lots of newspaper and
spread the mixture out as thin as possable.  Add the new water to the old water
squeesed out of the first batch of sawdust till you have 2 gallons, stir in the
next packet of the next darker shade of green and repeat the process.  Keep the
colors seperate as they dry turning every couple of hours to speed drying.
Move the sawdust inside at night under normal condutions it can take 2 days to
dry compleatly.  When it is dry sift the sawdust through window screen to sift
out the oversized pieces and splinters. This will remove about half the sawdust
you collected. Store the final product in plastic bags labled for each color
and your ready.  Hope this helps you with your project.
 
 
 

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by Mark Math » Mon, 04 Aug 2003 00:22:02


Quote:
Christian wrote...
>> Before I start by trial and error, I wonder if anyone out there has used
>> dye to color scenery material who would have any pointers?

> It isn't light fast.
> Daylight and/or Fluorescents do it in in just a few months.

I used dyed sawdust on a layout I had as a ***ager in the 70s.

The layout lasted about four years without any noticeable fading of the
sawdust grass.  However I had some extra dyed sawdust which I kept in a paper
bag and tucked away.  Twenty years later, that stuff had turned a uniform
gray by just sitting in a dark paper bag.

The sawdust that I used was a very fine mix of several types of wood (mainly,
oak, birch and fir plywood -- my father is a cabinet maker so I had an ample
supply from the stationary belt sander).

 
 
 

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by OLDFAR » Mon, 04 Aug 2003 05:19:57


Back in the 1940s we used to dye sawdust by mixing artist's oil colors with a
generous amount of turpentine, then soaking it up with handfulls of sawdust
which was then spread out on a newspaper to dry.  Do this outside - turpentine
really stinks in quantity.  The advantage to this method was an infinite
variety of colors available.  Today you could do the same with acrylics and
water, but I don't know if the color would hold up like the oil paints.

Walt

 
 
 

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by Trainma » Tue, 05 Aug 2003 01:31:59



Quote:
> Back in the 1940s we used to dye sawdust by mixing artist's oil colors
with a
> generous amount of turpentine, then soaking it up with handfulls of
sawdust
> which was then spread out on a newspaper to dry.  Do this outside -
turpentine
> really stinks in quantity.  The advantage to this method was an infinite
> variety of colors available.  Today you could do the same with acrylics
and
> water, but I don't know if the color would hold up like the oil paints.

> Walt

I use Ceramcoat acrylics and water.  So far (after about 3 years under
flourescents) the colors seem to be holding up well.

Don

--

http://www.geocities.com/don_dellmann



http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/MRPics

 
 
 

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by Gareth Qual » Tue, 05 Aug 2003 04:04:04


Thanks all for the comments.  I've asked mama if she can return the RIT.
Gary Q
 
 
 

Coloring sawdust (imitation Lionel imitation grass)

Post by Eri » Tue, 05 Aug 2003 07:25:55


I think the RIT is just plain old aniline dye. It should be ok with
water.

If you want to go the fancy route. You can try woodworkers aniline dye
because it's made for wood which sawdust is reputed to be made of.

http://www.constantines.com/ecatalog/page28/left_3_28.htm

They have a bright green which would probably simulate Lionel's garish
color.

Eric

I'm completing a project to make a re-creation of a Lionel "Scenic
Railway"
to put on display in an historic toy store operated by the museum
system in
our town.  I've used the illustrations of the original in the 1922
Lionel
catalog, and a photo of one that still exists in a collection from the
Kalmbach book on duplicating Lionel dealer display layouts, as my
guide.
The basic ground covering is some Life-like "mountain paper" that
comes very
close to the color blotched brown wrapping paper Lionel appears to
have
used.  I now want to duplicate the old Lionel grass made of dyed green
sawdust to add some texture to the paper ground cover, and to hide
some of
my seams in the paper covering.  I've found some RIT Kelly Green, and
Dark
Green dye in a local Kroger, and have sifted the contents of the shop
vac
connected to my radial arm saw through window screen to get sawdust of
the
right size.

Before I start by trial and error, I wonder if anyone out there has
used dye
to color scenery material who would have any pointers?  Specifically,
the
RIT instructions call for using boiling water/dye, but I think this
may be
to set the color in fabric, and may not be as important for layout
use, so I
want to try to use tepid water.  Will this work?  Thanks.  Gary Q