Passenger Train Colors?

Passenger Train Colors?

Post by Gareth Qual » Sat, 09 Jun 2001 19:13:40



Reading various publications, I get the impression that passenger trains in
the heavyweight steel car era (late 190X thru early 193X) were pretty dull -
mostly some shade of Pullman or coach green, some tuscan and only very
rarely a bright spot like the Alton's red and maroon.  With the introduction
of streamlining and lightweight trains in the mid 193Xs, color became the
thing.
I also catch glimpses that the wooden car era up to the turn of the last
century was a colorful time.  I understand the Pennsylvania Limited was
known as the "Yellow Kid" for its bright green/yellow/red livery.  The
Milwaukee's Pioneer Limited was orange and maroon, as was (I believe) the
C&O's FFV.  The B&O Royal Blue was just that.  I believe I've seen photos of
a train in white with gold lettering and lining, but I don't now recall the
road - Lackawanna maybe?
My questions are:
Do you know of sources for the colors of other RR's equipment from this era?
Were the bright colors just applied to the named trains, or the entire
passenger rosters?
I'm working on a train of LaBelle cars, and would like to make a splash, and
am looking for ideas.  Gary Q
 
 
 

Passenger Train Colors?

Post by JBort » Sat, 09 Jun 2001 21:11:56


Quote:
>My questions are:
>Do you know of sources for the colors of other RR's equipment from this era?
>Were the bright colors just applied to the named trains, or the entire
>passenger rosters?
>I'm working on a train of LaBelle cars, and would like to make a splash, and
>am looking for ideas.  Gary Q

Creating and maintaining the appearance of colorful cars was extremely labor
intensive. It was not really economical to do so and thus, even in the 19th
century, it was mainly name trains which had cars in colorful schemes. I know
that either the CNE or NH had an all white "ghost" train at one time but it was
short lived (imaging maintaining a pure white train in the early steam era!).
The CNJ had the Blue Comet, Bullet, etc. and there were briefly countless
others.

Of all the colors, dark green (pullman) probably shows dirt the least and would
also be very cheap, thus it became the standard. As costs increased throughout
the decades you'll also notice how all the gold striping vanishes and any
bright color schemes become more and more simple. Same thing applies even today
with complex "delivery schemes" more often than not evolving into more bland
ones. Just a matter of economics.

jbortle

 
 
 

Passenger Train Colors?

Post by James Bernie » Sun, 10 Jun 2001 00:51:22


Gareth,

  Before the 'steel' cars became popular, there were many special paint schemes
for individual trains.  By the time full length steel cars became the standard,
many railroads had standardized on a dark green(pullman green).  There were
variations of the green(coach green), and several lines used tuscan or maroon
variations(PRR, SOO), and of course the Milw used the orange scheme for years.

  Researching older paint schemes in the 'wood side' days of passenger
railroading should be interesting!  Good Luck...

Jim Bernier

Quote:

> Reading various publications, I get the impression that passenger trains in
> the heavyweight steel car era (late 190X thru early 193X) were pretty dull -
> mostly some shade of Pullman or coach green, some tuscan and only very
> rarely a bright spot like the Alton's red and maroon.  With the introduction
> of streamlining and lightweight trains in the mid 193Xs, color became the
> thing.
> I also catch glimpses that the wooden car era up to the turn of the last
> century was a colorful time.  I understand the Pennsylvania Limited was
> known as the "Yellow Kid" for its bright green/yellow/red livery.  The
> Milwaukee's Pioneer Limited was orange and maroon, as was (I believe) the
> C&O's FFV.  The B&O Royal Blue was just that.  I believe I've seen photos of
> a train in white with gold lettering and lining, but I don't now recall the
> road - Lackawanna maybe?
> My questions are:
> Do you know of sources for the colors of other RR's equipment from this era?
> Were the bright colors just applied to the named trains, or the entire
> passenger rosters?
> I'm working on a train of LaBelle cars, and would like to make a splash, and
> am looking for ideas.  Gary Q

 
 
 

Passenger Train Colors?

Post by Norm Dresne » Sun, 10 Jun 2001 04:22:51


There's a mailing list dedicated to modeling and researching passenger cars
past (mostly) and present.  The address to which one posts new messages is

I believe that if you visit the egroups (now yahoo-groups) home-page, you'll
be able to sign up to get all of the mailings.

    Norm


Quote:
> Reading various publications, I get the impression that passenger trains
in
> the heavyweight steel car era (late 190X thru early 193X) were pretty
dull -
> mostly some shade of Pullman or coach green, some tuscan and only very
> rarely a bright spot like the Alton's red and maroon.  With the
introduction
> of streamlining and lightweight trains in the mid 193Xs, color became the
> thing.
> I also catch glimpses that the wooden car era up to the turn of the last
> century was a colorful time.  I understand the Pennsylvania Limited was
> known as the "Yellow Kid" for its bright green/yellow/red livery.  The
> Milwaukee's Pioneer Limited was orange and maroon, as was (I believe) the
> C&O's FFV.  The B&O Royal Blue was just that.  I believe I've seen photos
of
> a train in white with gold lettering and lining, but I don't now recall
the
> road - Lackawanna maybe?
> My questions are:
> Do you know of sources for the colors of other RR's equipment from this
era?
> Were the bright colors just applied to the named trains, or the entire
> passenger rosters?
> I'm working on a train of LaBelle cars, and would like to make a splash,
and
> am looking for ideas.  Gary Q

 
 
 

Passenger Train Colors?

Post by Joe Ell » Sun, 10 Jun 2001 07:03:01


Quote:

>> Reading various publications, I get the impression that passenger trains in
>> the heavyweight steel car era (late 190X thru early 193X) were pretty dull -
>> mostly some shade of Pullman or coach green, some tuscan and only very
>> rarely a bright spot like the Alton's red and maroon.  With the introduction
>> of streamlining and lightweight trains in the mid 193Xs, color became the
>> thing.
>> I also catch glimpses that the wooden car era up to the turn of the last
>> century was a colorful time.  I understand the Pennsylvania Limited was
>> known as the "Yellow Kid" for its bright green/yellow/red livery.  The
>> Milwaukee's Pioneer Limited was orange and maroon, as was (I believe) the
>> C&O's FFV.  The B&O Royal Blue was just that.  I believe I've seen photos of
>> a train in white with gold lettering and lining, but I don't now recall the
>> road - Lackawanna maybe?

I can't really help you with any of the colors, but maybe a little
history/obscure knowledge.

The Yellow Kid was a cartoon - in fact, the FIRST cartoon - in newspapers.
It was immensely popular at the turn of the century. It's probable that
the nickname of the train came from the title character, who would
probably pass for a Hare Krishna today. (bald head, yellow robes, and BIG
ears) <<grin>>

--
 Joe Ellis € The Synthetic Filker        TesserAct Studios
 | W W | W W W | W W | W W W | W W | W W W | W W | W W W |
 | W W | W W W | W W | W W W | W W | W W W | W W | W W W |
 |_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|
Filk € Fly Fishing € Model Railroading € Digital Photography

 
 
 

Passenger Train Colors?

Post by John P. Frankli » Mon, 11 Jun 2001 14:39:19


     Before the red/orange/black and silver of the 1937 Daylight on the SP,
the heavyweight cars were painted in a "Pearl-esent" scheme. I guess you
could call it off white with with a pearl sheen to it. Imagine keeping that
clean in the steam era!

Pat

 
 
 

Passenger Train Colors?

Post by Jim Bernie » Mon, 11 Jun 2001 23:32:05


John,

  What is this "Pearl-esent" paint scheme?  What trains used this
scheme?  All I have ever seen for SP heavyweight equipment is the
standard dark green...

Jim Bernier

Quote:

>      Before the red/orange/black and silver of the 1937 Daylight on the SP,
> the heavyweight cars were painted in a "Pearl-esent" scheme. I guess you
> could call it off white with with a pearl sheen to it. Imagine keeping that
> clean in the steam era!

> Pat

 
 
 

Passenger Train Colors?

Post by Stef » Tue, 12 Jun 2001 06:40:23


Quote:

>John,

>  What is this "Pearl-esent" paint scheme?  What trains used this
>scheme?  All I have ever seen for SP heavyweight equipment is the
>standard dark green...

It was a shiny light gray scheme with gold lettering that was the concept of
then SP president Shoup for use on the early heavyweight Daylight equipment
in 1930. Some Sunset Limited observation cars were also painted this way. It
didn't last long
Stefan