Code 83 vs 100

Code 83 vs 100

Post by msowsu » Sun, 09 Jan 2000 04:00:00



I have read quite a few times on this news group
that " it will only run on code 100".

Is it not true that code 83 actually will run deeper flanges
than code 100 because of the way the code 83 rails are
imbedded in the ties?


 
 
 

Code 83 vs 100

Post by Mark Alan Mille » Sun, 09 Jan 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
> I have read quite a few times on this news group
> that " it will only run on code 100".

> Is it not true that code 83 actually will run deeper flanges
> than code 100 because of the way the code 83 rails are
> imbedded in the ties?



Code 83 track is not generally imbedded in the ties any more than code 100
is.  On good code 83 track (such as MicroEngineering), the spike detail is
finer and doesn't stick up as far, so there is more clearance for large
flanges than you might expect given the difference in rail size.  It's all
pretty much a moot point these days, anyway, since you'd have to search a
good bit to find anything made in the last decade that doesn't run
perfectly well on Code 83 (excepting possibly some toy trains stuff that
hobbyists don't use).  Other than cost, and that is changing, there is no
compelling argument for using Code 100.  It is not detectably more durable
or easier to lay, and only equipment from the dark ages won't run on it.
Heck, almost everything from the last 20 years runs just fine on Code 70
and even Code 55.

Mark Alan Miller

 
 
 

Code 83 vs 100

Post by Jon Mille » Sun, 09 Jan 2000 04:00:00


    Micro Engineering also makes code 55 flex track in HO gauge and if your
wheels are at least RP25 or better your trains will run fine.  They make no
switches in code 55 and they are probably not needed.  Code 55 makes good
spur/industrial track and the switch off the mainline would be either 83 or
70.  Just make the transition to small rail.
 
 
 

Code 83 vs 100

Post by Steve Lync » Tue, 11 Jan 2000 04:00:00


From Steve Rothaug presently building in HO using code 83:

All of the Flex track on the T&SB is Atlas code 83.  I've put down about
150' of it so far and have had no problems with it.  Between turnouts, I
stagger all rail connections by about 2 or 3" for reliability and
smoothness.  I cut the movable rail back about 2" and slide it off the tie
strip.  Then, on the new track section, carefully pull the movable rail out
(2" again) to meet the cut piece and slide it on to the tie strip.  As for
cutting the ends evenly, the only time I've had to do that is in laying
track up to a turnout.

Then I bring the track up to the turnout, GBY (gauge-by-eye) and snip it
with the rail cutters.  A few swipes with a file and all is well.
As far as track detail goes, once the track is weathered and ballasted,
maybe 1 person out of 100 would be able to identify the brand.  Same goes
for code 100 vs code 83.  It's more of a "feeling" of size then an actual
eyeball measurement.  I mean it's seven*** thousandths of an inch smaller.
Code 70 rail is noticeably smaller then code 100.  The last time I hand laid
track, it was with code 70.  It was fun, but time consuming. Steve Rothaug

Quote:

>    Micro Engineering also makes code 55 flex track in HO gauge and if your
>wheels are at least RP25 or better your trains will run fine.  They make no
>switches in code 55 and they are probably not needed.  Code 55 makes good
>spur/industrial track and the switch off the mainline would be either 83 or
>70.  Just make the transition to small rail.