Newbie question: HO track codes : 83 vs 100

Newbie question: HO track codes : 83 vs 100

Post by Guy Sault » Mon, 15 Feb 1999 04:00:00



I have found no ready reference on things like track gauges; i.e., what is
the difference between "code 83" track and, say, "code 100" track?  Are
these systems incompatible for some reason?  Or is it as simple as the
number of cross-ties per foot?

Thanks,  Guy

 
 
 

Newbie question: HO track codes : 83 vs 100

Post by Guy Sault » Mon, 15 Feb 1999 04:00:00


Thanks for clearing that up.  That would translate into quite a jolt for a
real train, but I think I'll only worry about it in passing.

Guy

Quote:


>>I have found no ready reference on things like track gauges; i.e., what is
>>the difference between "code 83" track and, say, "code 100" track?  Are
>>these systems incompatible for some reason?  Or is it as simple as the
>>number of cross-ties per foot?

>The "Code" number is just the height of the rail, measured in thousandths
of
>an inch, so code 100 is .100" high.  This is just for the rail itself, and
>doesn't include the tie thickness.

>In any given scale, the code represents a weight of the prototype rail,
with
>the larger code number representing a heavier rail.

>In HO, code 100 is pretty large, pretty small in O and in the middle for S.

>Most modern modelers who are starting out new, no investment in old track,
>etc are using code 83, but you can often find code 100 cheaper.  And
fussier
>modelers often use code 70 to represent lighter rail, suitable for branch
>lines or older secondary mainline trackage for that matter such as sidings,
>etc.  HO narrow gauge modelers may use code 55 or code 40...

>There are "compromise" or transition sections available to change from one
>to another, but it's usually pretty easy to do without special pieces if
you
>are laying your own track.

>The matter of "cross-ties per foot" is a more subtle thing, and there are
>prototype standards for determining this, depending on how heavy the
loading
>the track has to support, but few modelers bother with this, nor do many
>pre-fab track makers worry about it either.

>Fred D.

>Fred D.


 
 
 

Newbie question: HO track codes : 83 vs 100

Post by Rusty Keen » Tue, 16 Feb 1999 04:00:00


On Sun, 14 Feb 1999 16:08:53 -0500, "Guy Saults"

Quote:

>I have found no ready reference on things like track gauges; i.e., what is
>the difference between "code 83" track and, say, "code 100" track?  Are
>these systems incompatible for some reason?  Or is it as simple as the
>number of cross-ties per foot?

>Thanks,  Guy

It's partly simple and partly not-so-simple.  Code simply refers the
height of the rail itself in thousandths of an inch.  Code 83 is
083", code 100 is .100.  In HO, code 100 is bigger than anything yet
on a prototype (Proto rail is measured in pounds per yard, not
height).  Code 83 is pretty close to heavily-used mainline rail, both
contemporary and late steam.  Code 70 and Code 55 are also used by
modelers for yards and light branch lines.

The two are compatible, i.e., you can have code 83 rail joined to code
100, but the former has to be shimmed up to the height of the code
100.

The more recent trend is to the use of code 83 because it looks better
than 100, and because it is now more widely available than ten years
ago.  The drawback is that 83 (and 70, 55, and 40) is more expensive
than code 100.

Many modelers use 100 where it is less obvious or hidden (price).

However, many HO wheels have flanges too deep for code 83, so for
people new to the hobby, code 100 is recommended, because anything
should run on it.

Also a consideration is the material.  Brass track should be avoided,
period.  Oxidation is difficult to control, and becuase it is an
insulator, causes erratic running.  No matter what the code, use only
nickel-silver.  Fortunately, brass track is becoming a rarity, and
I've never seen it in codes smaller than 100.

Welcome to the hobby!

 
 
 

Newbie question: HO track codes : 83 vs 100

Post by Donald Kinne » Tue, 16 Feb 1999 04:00:00


Goto :
http://users.vnet.net/paulrver/st_welco.html
There you will find almost everything you will ever want to know about
standards.
Donald
Quote:

>I have found no ready reference on things like track gauges; i.e., what is
>the difference between "code 83" track and, say, "code 100" track?  Are
>these systems incompatible for some reason?  Or is it as simple as the
>number of cross-ties per foot?

>Thanks,  Guy