Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Daniel A. Micke » Thu, 02 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Many streamliner passenger cars, from the original Pioneer Zephyr to
modern Amtrak,
had/still have/ stainless steel surfaces which were quite shiny and
reflective.

Is there any user-friendly way to simulate stainless steel on plastic
models?  The usual "silver" or "aluminum" paint color can not really
look the same.

Dan Mickey

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by F. DABNE » Thu, 02 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Many streamliner passenger cars, from the original Pioneer Zephyr to
> modern Amtrak,
> had/still have/ stainless steel surfaces which were quite shiny and
> reflective.

> Is there any user-friendly way to simulate stainless steel on plastic
> models?  The usual "silver" or "aluminum" paint color can not really
> look the same.

This comes up about once a week...

For paint, try Testor's "Metalizer" in the buffing variety.  Get their
instruction sheet and follow it!  There is also a product called "Bare
Metal Foil" which is super thin metal film intended to be pressed onto the
model.  Look for both in the Aircraft/Military section of better hobby
shops.

Fred D.
Watching the action from BNSF MP 1112, El Paso sub

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by john a dalt » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
>Many streamliner passenger cars, from the original Pioneer Zephyr to
>modern Amtrak,
>had/still have/ stainless steel surfaces which were quite shiny and
>reflective.

>Is there any user-friendly way to simulate stainless steel on plastic
>models?  The usual "silver" or "aluminum" paint color can not really
>look the same.

>Dan Mickey

....dan...one of the earlier issues of MR or RMC has an article about
the application of aluminum foil to the surface of a model passenger
car...since foil has two "surfaces" to choose from, they were able to
duplicate corrugated or smoothside aluminum or stainless steel...i
will try to find the article for you if you are interested...as i
remember, it used a 3M spray adhesive and was "burnished" into place
much like the old "gold leaf" application on picture and mirror
frames...the foil apparently has a "stretch" factor...the one article
is the only time i have ever seen the procedure used on a rail
model...

...hope this helps...big john...

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Brad Libb » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Many streamliner passenger cars, from the original Pioneer Zephyr to
> modern Amtrak,
> had/still have/ stainless steel surfaces which were quite shiny and
> reflective.

> Is there any user-friendly way to simulate stainless steel on plastic
> models?  The usual "silver" or "aluminum" paint color can not really
> look the same.

> Dan Mickey

Bare Metal Foil company has several types of self adhesive foil products
that are quite easy to apply, I think they have one that will simulate
stainless.  They advertise in FSM (Fine Scale Modeler) and SAE (Scale
Auto Enthusiast) both Kalmbach puplications.

Brad

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Dennis74 » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Hi,

Bare-Metal Foil has a web-site at:

http://www.gremlins.com/bmf/index.html

It holds are the answers you seek. <g>

You can order directly from them.

They carry a substancial amount of other products,
as well as the foils.

Hope this helps,

Dennis Conway
Los Angeles
NASG, TTOS

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Mike Dod » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
> Is there any user-friendly way to simulate stainless steel on plastic
> models?  The usual "silver" or "aluminum" paint color can not really
> look the same.

Check with your local hobby shop for a product called Bare Metal Foil.
It's an extremely thin, adhesive-backed, foil that conforms to almost any
shape.  It's received some favorable comments over the years.
--
Mike  (Remove "vutil" from address to reply)
 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Midori Sellers and Tim Brisk » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00




Quote:
> Many streamliner passenger cars, from the original Pioneer Zephyr to
> modern Amtrak,
> had/still have/ stainless steel surfaces which were quite shiny and
> reflective.

> Is there any user-friendly way to simulate stainless steel on plastic
> models?  The usual "silver" or "aluminum" paint color can not really
> look the same.

> Dan Mickey

Hi my name is Tim Brisko, I generally model anime Sci-fi models but love to
trade tips and techniques with all types of model makers.  I have found
Bare metal foil extremely difficult to deal with, I don't like the aluminum
foil trick, and I don't care for testor's metalizer line(the paints are
unpredicitable and the finish isn't very durable).  The product I use that
works wonderfully and truly looks authentic is SnJ Spray Metal.  It is put
out by a fine gentleman in California.  You airbrush it on (it is enamel)
and then you polish it with a powder compound.  The starter set is about 14
dollars I think and you get two bottles of spray metal, one bottle of
polishing compound, and a soft cloth to buff with.  The finish is extemely
authentic and very durable, I was amazed.  If you can't find it at a local
hobby store, get it from the manbufacturer at

Hope it helps,

Tim Brisko

SF3D Network

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Charles A. Davi » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Quote:



> > Many streamliner passenger cars, from the original Pioneer Zephyr to
> > modern Amtrak,
> > had/still have/ stainless steel surfaces which were quite shiny and
> > reflective.

> > Is there any user-friendly way to simulate stainless steel on plastic
> > models?  The usual "silver" or "aluminum" paint color can not really
> > look the same.

> > Dan Mickey

> Hi my name is Tim Brisko, I generally model anime Sci-fi models but love to
> trade tips and techniques with all types of model makers.  I have found
> Bare metal foil extremely difficult to deal with, I don't like the aluminum
> foil trick, and I don't care for testor's metalizer line(the paints are
> unpredicitable and the finish isn't very durable).  The product I use that
> works wonderfully and truly looks authentic is SnJ Spray Metal.  It is put
> out by a fine gentleman in California.  You airbrush it on (it is enamel)
> and then you polish it with a powder compound.  The starter set is about 14
> dollars I think and you get two bottles of spray metal, one bottle of
> polishing compound, and a soft cloth to buff with.  The finish is extemely
> authentic and very durable, I was amazed.  If you can't find it at a local
> hobby store, get it from the manbufacturer at

> Hope it helps,

> Tim Brisko

> SF3D Network

This sounds like an excellent material _for applications wher 'Bare
Metal Foil' could be used_. The real problem, is not that there isn't
someting that will 'look verry good' on the large area, what's missing,
is something tha is even _passable_, in locations where you
_can't_get_at_it to_buff/rub_the_finish_. Such as under piping,
handrails, around hardware (hinges etc.).
We do need to find out about things like this product, but it _isn't_
the whole answer.

Chuck

--
-----------------------------------------------------------
He, who will not reason, is a bigot;       William Drumond,
he, who cannot, is a fool;                  Scottish writer
and he, who dares not, is a slave.              (1585-1649)
While he that does, is a free man!          Joseph P. 1955-
-----------------------------------------------------------
Chuck Davis  /  Sutherlin Industries   FAX # (804) 799-0940

Sutherlin, ***ia 24594            Voice # (804) 799-5803

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Midori Sellers and Tim Brisk » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
> This sounds like an excellent material _for applications wher 'Bare
> Metal Foil' could be used_. The real problem, is not that there isn't
> someting that will 'look verry good' on the large area, what's missing,
> is something tha is even _passable_, in locations where you
> _can't_get_at_it to_buff/rub_the_finish_. Such as under piping,
> handrails, around hardware (hinges etc.).
> We do need to find out about things like this product, but it _isn't_
> the whole answer.

> Chuck

The SnJ looks great, better than passable, even when not buffed.  In fact,
part of the charm of this product is that it mimics metal so completely.
You can mask off areas to leave dull and buff other areas to a high shine.
It is a very versitile product.  If you study metal finishes you will see
that there isn't always the same 'shine' to all areas of a given object.
Especially where the object is weathered.  I find that this has been the
most authentic product out on the market.  This is all of course only one
modeler's opinion.  I do not consequently mean to suggest this is the only
way, or the answer to everyone's needs.  It is just the best thing I have
found, and I thought I would share the info.  

BTW you can also tint SnJ with regular enamels to achieve a steel, iron,
even bronze or copper finish.  

Tim Brisko

SF3D Network

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Charles A. Davi » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

> The SnJ looks great, better than passable, even when not buffed.  In fact,
> part of the charm of this product is that it mimics metal so completely.
> You can mask off areas to leave dull and buff other areas to a high shine.
> It is a very versitile product.  If you study metal finishes you will see
> that there isn't always the same 'shine' to all areas of a given object.
> Especially where the object is weathered.  I find that this has been the
> most authentic product out on the market.  This is all of course only one
> modeler's opinion.  I do not consequently mean to suggest this is the only
> way, or the answer to everyone's needs.  It is just the best thing I have
> found, and I thought I would share the info.

> BTW you can also tint SnJ with regular enamels to achieve a steel, iron,
> even bronze or copper finish.

> Tim Brisko

> SSoundsF3D Network

Sounds better and better ---   Thanks Tim, for the additional
information.

Chuck

--
-----------------------------------------------------------
He, who will not reason, is a bigot;       William Drumond,
he, who cannot, is a fool;                  Scottish writer
and he, who dares not, is a slave.              (1585-1649)
While he that does, is a free man!          Joseph P. 1955-
-----------------------------------------------------------
Chuck Davis  /  Sutherlin Industries   FAX # (804) 799-0940

Sutherlin, ***ia 24594            Voice # (804) 799-5803

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Daniel A. Micke » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:


> > The SnJ looks great, better than passable, even when not buffed.  In fact,
> > part of the charm of this product is that it mimics metal so completely.
> > You can mask off areas to leave dull and buff other areas to a high shine.

snip

Quote:
> > Tim Brisko

> > SSoundsF3D Network

> Sounds better and better ---   Thanks Tim, for the additional
> information.

> Chuck

Sounds just like what I have been looking for.  Soon, I will take on
another locomotive project and try this (But first on a cheaper car).

The original Santa Fe F3s and F7s had shiny side panels; on the A unit,
the panel above the beltline and between the doors was painted and the
panel below the beltline and both panels behind the rear door was
shiny.  (See page 94 of Cyclopedia Volume 2.

On the Alco PAs and PBs all of the side panels were shiny.  (See page 82
of the Cyclopedia where trees and buildings are reflected in the side
panels.)

I think that the tops of both locomotive types were painted.

Fluted passenger cars were also shiny on the sides, and (I think) either
painted, or weathered on top.

Thanks for the tremendous response.

Dan Mickey

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Jose M. Altub » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00


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Quote:

> Many streamliner passenger cars, from the original Pioneer Zephyr to
> modern Amtrak,
> had/still have/ stainless steel surfaces which were quite shiny and
> reflective.

> Is there any user-friendly way to simulate stainless steel on plastic
> models?  The usual "silver" or "aluminum" paint color can not really
> look the same.

> Dan Mickey

Another product you might give a try is BARE METAL FOIL, available at
any hobby shop that sells 1/24 car kits and detail parts for same. It is
more "user friendly" than aluminum foil, stretches better around details
and is self-adhesive. Jose.

--
Jose M. Altube
11407 NW 35th St.
C***Springs.
FL 33065-2605.

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begin:          vcard
fn:             Jose Altube
n:              Altube;Jose
org:            Model car dealer
adr:            11407 NW 35th St;;;C***Springs;FL;33065-2605;USA

tel;home:       954-340-3104
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Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Michael Bilhart » Fri, 03 Oct 1997 04:00:00




Quote:

> > Hi my name is Tim Brisko, I generally model anime Sci-fi models but
love to
> > trade tips and techniques with all types of model makers.  I have found
> > Bare metal foil extremely difficult to deal with, I don't like the
aluminum
> > foil trick, and I don't care for testor's metalizer line(the paints are
> > unpredicitable and the finish isn't very durable).  The product I use
that
> > works wonderfully and truly looks authentic is SnJ Spray Metal.  It is
put
> > out by a fine gentleman in California.  You airbrush it on (it is
enamel)
> > and then you polish it with a powder compound.  The starter set is
about 14
> > dollars I think and you get two bottles of spray metal, one bottle of
> > polishing compound, and a soft cloth to buff with.  The finish is
extemely
> > authentic and very durable, I was amazed.  If you can't find it at a
local
> > hobby store, get it from the manbufacturer at

> This sounds like an excellent material _for applications wher 'Bare
> Metal Foil' could be used_. The real problem, is not that there isn't
> someting that will 'look verry good' on the large area, what's missing,
> is something tha is even _passable_, in locations where you
> _can't_get_at_it to_buff/rub_the_finish_. Such as under piping,
> handrails, around hardware (hinges etc.).
> We do need to find out about things like this product, but it _isn't_
> the whole answer.

From monitoring rec.models.scale my impression is that SnJ has the best
reputation of any of these types of products.  In particular, it is
supposed to be more durable than Testor's metalizer which would be
important in this application.  I think that there is no way to put a
stainless steel type finish under piping and handrails, even on the
prototype I think the stainless steel siding is put on first, and then
piping and handrails, although I think it might be possible to buff around
them very satisfactorily.  I believe that you can probably buff over
details like hinges.  I don't think that model railroad equipment is unique
is this regard- its unique requirement is that it usually gets more
handling than other scale models.

SnJ is another one of those things on my todo list- I've got some Santa Fe
passenger car kits to try it on eventually.

Regards,
-Mike Bilhartz

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Andy Harm » Sat, 04 Oct 1997 04:00:00


On Thu, 02 Oct 1997 22:16:32 -0400, "Daniel A. Mickey"

Quote:

>Fluted passenger cars were also shiny on the sides, and (I think) either
>painted, or weathered on top.

Most fluted cars as built were not painted on the roof, unless the car
itself was painted like some PRR and UP Budd cars.  Budd cars had full
fluting on the roof, ACF and Pullmans had a smooth seamed roof of
polished stainless - ACF's had a couple rows of visible rivets on top.
Many of the ACF and Pullman cars had their roofs painted or sealed
later in life so just about anything goes on top.  Still, many cars I
saw after retirement from Amtrak service were still bare stainless on
top.

Andy

Visit the Prototype Modelers Group Web Page at http://w3.one.net/~aharman/index.html
Sorry I must resort to anti-spam practice, reply to aharman at one (spelled out) dot net

 
 
 

Simulated Stainless Steel (Any Gauge)

Post by Mighty J » Sat, 04 Oct 1997 04:00:00


I have found a very good way to simulate corrugated metal doors and
siding in O and S scales. It may sound funny, but it works and looks
good.

By a box of Nabisco Malomars and take the corrugated paper cover from
the inside of the box and use that as your starting point. For a roll up
garage door, leave it as it is. For siding, just glue it to an
appropriate backing material for stiffening.

You can paint it any color (including metal finishes) by simply
undercoating it first with any barrier product appropriate for the paint
you will use. When dry, simply paint, using a small brush. The results
will amaze you.

Regards,

Mighty Joe

Renaissance Man Extraordin=E5ire